Writing Ireland's Working Class

Dublin After O'Casey

Author: Michael Pierse

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230299350

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 345

View: 4436

Exploring writing of working-class Dublin after Seán O'Casey, this book breaks new ground in Irish Studies, unearthing submerged narratives of class in Irish life. Examining how working-class identity is depicted by authors like Brendan Behan and Roddy Doyle, it discusses how this hidden, urban Ireland has appeared in the country's literature.

A History of Irish Working-Class Writing

Author: Michael Pierse

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107149681

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 482

View: 1713

This book constitutes a wide-ranging and authoritative chronicle of the writing of Irish working-class experience. Ground-breaking in scholarship and comprehensive in scope, it represents a significant intervention in Irish Studies and English Literary Studies generally, charting representations of Irish working-class life from eighteenth-century poetry to Celtic Tiger drama.

A History of the Irish Working Class

(With a New Preface)

Author: Peter Berresford Ellis

Publisher: Pluto Press

ISBN: 9780745300092

Category: History

Page: 372

View: 1331

This modern classic of Irish history is an accomplished and readable synthesis. Subjects covered include the early 'communism' of the Celtic clans ; the role of the Church; the Irish aristocracy and their handover to Henry II; Wolfe Tone’s rising and O’Connell’s betrayal.

Working-Class Writing and Publishing in the Late-Twentieth Century

Author: Tom Woodin

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780719091117

Category:

Page: 256

View: 6351

From the early 1970s, working class writing and publishing in local communities rapidly proliferated into a national movement. This book is the first full evaluation of these developments and opens up new perspectives on literature, culture, class and identity over the past 50 years. Itsorigins are traced in the context of international shifts in class politics, civil rights, personal expression and cultural change. The writing of young people, older people, adult literacy groups as well as writing workshops is analysed. Thematic chapters explore how audiences consumed this work,the learning of writers, the fierce debates over identity, class and organisation, as well as changing relations with mainstream institutions. The book is accessibly written but engages with a wide range of scholarly work in history, education, cultural studies, literature and sociology. It will beof interest to lecturers and students in these areas as well as the general reader.

Rethinking the Irish Diaspora

After The Gathering

Author: Johanne Devlin Trew,Michael Pierse

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319407848

Category: Social Science

Page: 299

View: 1033

This book provides scholarly perspectives on a range of timely concerns in Irish diaspora studies. It offers a focal point for fresh interchanges and theoretical insights on questions of identity, Irishness, historiography and the academy’s role in all of these. In doing so, it chimes with the significant public debates on Irish and Irish emigrant identities that have emerged from Ireland’s The Gathering initiative (2013) and that continue to reverberate throughout the Decade of Centenaries (2012-2023) in Ireland, North and South. In ten chapters of new research on key areas of concern in this field, the book sustains a conversation centred on three core questions: what is diaspora in the Irish context and who does it include/exclude? What is the view of Ireland and Northern Ireland from the diaspora? How can new perspectives in the academy engage with a more rigorous and probing theorisation of these concerns? This thought-provoking work will appeal to students and scholars of history, geography, literature, sociology, tourism studies and Irish studies.

Dublin Seven

Author: Frankie Gaffney

Publisher: Liberties Press

ISBN: 1910742368

Category: Fiction

Page: 312

View: 6777

And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages. Just left school and keen to assert his independence, Shane loses himself in the tail end of Celtic Tiger nightlife. Through a chance meeting with a local cocaine dealer, he sets himself up in business. —C’mere. D’ye know where I’d get a bit of tha stuff? Shane asked Griffo. —It’s deadly so it is. —Yeah no bother kid, it’s always there if ye want it, anytime. Soon, Shane’s life is drugs, dance music, gangsters - and a beautiful girlfriend. But as the Celtic Tiger fades, so does Shane’s luck. The threats multiply, his paranoia builds and the violence creeps closer. —Shane just leave it please, tha youngfella is a scumbag, yeh don’t know what he migh do. —Yer man’s not gonna do anythin. —He’s a bogey cunt! He’s meant to be into armed robberies and all. Dublin Seven is a classic coming-of-age gangster tale, combined with a troubled urban romance - a cross between Goodfellas and Love/Hate.

The Making of the English Working Class

Author: E. P. Thompson

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1504022173

Category: History

Page: 848

View: 2304

A history of the common people and the Industrial Revolution: “A true masterpiece” and one of the Modern Library’s 100 Best Nonfiction Books of the twentieth century (Tribune). During the formative years of the Industrial Revolution, English workers and artisans claimed a place in society that would shape the following centuries. But the capitalist elite did not form the working class—the workers shaped their own creations, developing a shared identity in the process. Despite their lack of power and the indignity forced upon them by the upper classes, the working class emerged as England’s greatest cultural and political force. Crucial to contemporary trends in all aspects of society, at the turn of the nineteenth century, these workers united into the class that we recognize all across the Western world today. E. P. Thompson’s magnum opus, The Making of the English Working Class defined early twentieth-century English social and economic history, leading many to consider him Britain’s greatest postwar historian. Its publication in 1963 was highly controversial in academia, but the work has become a seminal text on the history of the working class. It remains incredibly relevant to the social and economic issues of current times, with the Guardian saying upon the book’s fiftieth anniversary that it “continues to delight and inspire new readers.”

The Cambridge History of Ireland: Volume 2, 1550–1730

Author: Jane Ohlmeyer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108651054

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 3756

This volume offers fresh perspectives on the political, military, religious, social, cultural, intellectual, economic, and environmental history of early modern Ireland and situates these discussions in global and comparative contexts. The opening chapters focus on 'Politics' and 'Religion and War' and offer a chronological narrative, informed by the re-interpretation of new archives. The remaining chapters are more thematic, with chapters on 'Society', 'Culture', and 'Economy and Environment', and often respond to wider methodologies and historiographical debates. Interdisciplinary cross-pollination - between, on the one hand, history and, on the other, disciplines like anthropology, archaeology, geography, computer science, literature and gender and environmental studies - informs many of the chapters. The volume offers a range of new departures by a generation of scholars who explain in a refreshing and accessible manner how and why people acted as they did in the transformative and tumultuous years between 1550 and 1730.

How the Irish Became White

Author: Noel Ignatiev

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135070695

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 369

'...from time to time a study comes along that truly can be called ‘path breaking,’ ‘seminal,’ ‘essential,’ a ‘must read.’ How the Irish Became White is such a study.' John Bracey, W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies, University of Massachussetts, Amherst The Irish came to America in the eighteenth century, fleeing a homeland under foreign occupation and a caste system that regarded them as the lowest form of humanity. In the new country – a land of opportunity – they found a very different form of social hierarchy, one that was based on the color of a person’s skin. Noel Ignatiev’s 1995 book – the first published work of one of America’s leading and most controversial historians – tells the story of how the oppressed became the oppressors; how the new Irish immigrants achieved acceptance among an initially hostile population only by proving that they could be more brutal in their oppression of African Americans than the nativists. This is the story of How the Irish Became White.

Conversations with Friends

A Novel

Author: Sally Rooney

Publisher: Hogarth Press

ISBN: 0451499050

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 1964

"Sharp, funny, thought-provoking . . . a really great portrait of two young women as they're figuring out how to be adults." - Celeste Ng, "Late Night with Seth Meyers Podcast" Winner of the 2017 Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Frances is a cool-headed and darkly observant young woman, vaguely pursuing a career in writing while studying in Dublin. Her best friend and comrade-in-arms is the beautiful and endlessly self-possessed Bobbi. At a local poetry performance one night, Frances and Bobbi catch the eye of Melissa, a well-known photographer, and as the girls are then gradually drawn into Melissa's world, Frances is reluctantly impressed by the older woman's sophisticated home and tall, handsome husband, Nick. However amusing and ironic Frances and Nick's flirtation seems at first, it gives way to a strange intimacy, and Frances's friendship with Bobbi begins to fracture. As Frances tries to keep her life in check, her relationships increasingly resist her control: with Nick, with her difficult and unhappy father, and finally, terribly, with Bobbi. Desperate to reconcile her inner life to the desires and vulnerabilities of her body, Frances's intellectual certainties begin to yield to something new: a painful and disorienting way of living from moment to moment. Written with gem-like precision and marked by a sly sense of humor, Conversations with Friends is wonderfully alive to the pleasures and dangers of youth, and the messy edges of female friendship.

Anam Cara

A Book of Celtic Wisdom

Author: John O'Donohue

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9780061865855

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 256

View: 5758

Discover the Celtic Circle of Belonging John O'Donohue, poet, philosopher, and scholar, guides you through the spiritual landscape of the Irish imagination. In Anam Cara, Gaelic for "soul friend," the ancient teachings, stories, and blessings of Celtic wisdom provide such profound insights on the universal themes of friendship, solitude, love, and death as: Light is generous The human heart is never completely born Love as ancient recognition The body is the angel of the soul Solitude is luminous Beauty likes neglected places The passionate heart never ages To benatural is to be holy Silence is the sister of the divine Death as an invitation to freedom

The Condition of the Working-Class in England in 1844

Author: Frederick Engels

Publisher: BookRix GmbH & Company KG

ISBN: 3730964852

Category: History

Page: 466

View: 8536

The Condition of the Working Class in England is one of the best-known works of Friedrich Engels. Originally written in German as Die Lage der arbeitenden Klasse in England, it is a study of the working class in Victorian England. It was also Engels' first book, written during his stay in Manchester from 1842 to 1844. Manchester was then at the very heart of the Industrial Revolution, and Engels compiled his study from his own observations and detailed contemporary reports. Engels argues that the Industrial Revolution made workers worse off. He shows, for example, that in large industrial cities mortality from disease, as well as death-rates for workers were higher than in the countryside. In cities like Manchester and Liverpool mortality from smallpox, measles, scarlet fever and whooping cough was four times as high as in the surrounding countryside, and mortality from convulsions was ten times as high as in the countryside. The overall death-rate in Manchester and Liverpool was significantly higher than the national average (one in 32.72 and one in 31.90 and even one in 29.90, compared with one in 45 or one in 46). An interesting example shows the increase in the overall death-rates in the industrial town of Carlisle where before the introduction of mills (1779-1787), 4,408 out of 10,000 children died before reaching the age of five, and after their introduction the figure rose to 4,738. Before the introduction of mills, 1,006 out of 10,000 adults died before reaching 39 years old, and after their introduction the death rate rose to 1,261 out of 10,000.

A Model Partner

Author: Daniel Seery

Publisher: Liberties Press

ISBN: 1909718440

Category: Fiction

Page: 299

View: 713

Tom Stacey has a lot to think about these days. The bees for one. He hasn't seen any but he keeps hearing them, buzzing in the fridge at work, in the overhead lights, in the test equipment in the factory where he has spent the last fifteen years of his working life. They seem to be getting louder and more insistent. Then there is his search for Sarah McCarthy. Sarah was his first love when, as a teenager, he travelled around the country in the back of a horsebox with his grieving grandfather. But perhaps it isn't the bees or the past which is the problem. Perhaps it is his loneliness. Twenty-two dates with Happy Couples dating agency and nothing to show. Relationships are all about the details and there are just not enough boxes to tick on the agency's personal profile form. Armed with a wax model and a list of criteria, Tom sets out on a quest to create a personal profile to find his ideal match. On his journey, he meets people just like him, warm but unable to show it, lonely and unable to remedy it, the lost, the misplaced and the damaged.

A History of Irish Autobiography

Author: Liam Harte

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108548458

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 8664

A History of Irish Autobiography is the first ever critical survey of autobiographical self-representation in Ireland from its recoverable beginnings to the twenty-first century. The book draws on a wealth of original scholarship by leading experts to provide an authoritative examination of autobiographical writing in the English and Irish languages. Beginning with a comprehensive overview of autobiography theory and criticism in Ireland, the History guides the reader through seventeen centuries of Irish achievement in autobiography, a category that incorporates diverse literary forms, from religious tracts and travelogues to letters, diaries, and online journals. This ambitious book is rich in insight. Chapters are structured around key subgenres, themes, texts, and practitioners, each featuring a guide to recommended further reading. The volume's extensive coverage is complemented by a detailed chronology of Irish autobiography from the fifth century to the contemporary era, the first of its kind to be published.

Writing Alone and with Others

Author: Pat Schneider

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 019516573X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 390

View: 2558

For more than a quarter of a century, Pat Schneider has helped writers find and liberate their true voices. Now, Schneider's acclaimed methods are made available in a single well-organized and highly readable volume.

Representing Ireland

Gender, Class, Nationality

Author: Susan Shaw Sailer

Publisher: University Press of Florida

ISBN: 9780813015439

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 516

"From demographics to politics to very private memory making, this volume covers the 'grounds' of Irishness as no other I have seen. Considering the variety of topics and the different interests among the contributors, it is remarkable that [the book] is so consistently accessible, jargon-free, and graceful."--Mary Lowe-Evans, University of West Florida "A wide-ranging and important collection of essays on the intersections of social class, gender, national identity, and aesthetics in Irish literature and culture. It is a timely and significant contribution to Irish studies."--Jonathan Allison, University of Kentucky In one of the first books to bring contemporary critical theory to bear on Irish studies, contributors--eminent Irish and American scholars--provide insightful and timely essays on Ireland's changing identity by looking at representations of Ireland in history, film, literature, and political science. Contributors explore the role of language in identity construction, modern efforts to reconstruct Irish identity after the Great Famine, and the impact of gender and class on nationality. Ultimately, the Ireland that emerges from these theoretical, multidisciplinary snapshots is complex, diverse, and largely unmapped. Long defined by others, it is also an Ireland ready and eager to define itself. CONTENTS Introduction: Representation: Responsibility/Ideology/Power/Difference, by Susan Shaw Sailer Part I. Constructing Irish Identities: Nationality, Gender, Language 1. From Nationalism to Liberation, by Declan Kiberd 2. "The Stone Recalls Its Quarry": An Interview with Eil�an N� Chuillean�in 3. Why I Choose to Write in Irish, The Corpse That Sits Up and Talks Back, by Nuala N� Dhomhnaill Part II. Reconstructing Irish Identities 4. Irish Identity and the Illustrated London News 1846-1851: Famine to Depopulation, by Leslie Williams 5. Studying a New Science: Yeats, Irishness, and the East, by John Rickard 6. The Changing Social Bases of Political Identity in Ireland, by Timothy J. White Part III. Interweavings: Gender, Class, Nationality 7. Class, Gender, and the Forms of Narrative: The Autobiographies of Anglo-Irish Women, by Elizabeth Grubgeld 8. Irish Working-Class Women and World War I, by Claire A. Culleton 9. First Principles and Last Things: Death and the Poetry of Eavan Boland and Audre Lorde, by Margaret Mills Harper 10. Women, "Queers," Love, and Politics: The Crying Game as a Corrective Adaptation of / Reply to The Hostage, by Maureen S. G. Hawkins Susan Shaw Sailer is associate professor of English at West Virginia University and the author of On the Void of To Be: Incoherence and Trope in Finnegans Wake (1993).

The Heart's Invisible Furies

A Novel

Author: John Boyne

Publisher: Hogarth

ISBN: 1524760803

Category: Fiction

Page: 592

View: 793

Named Book of the Month Club's Book of the Year, 2017 Selected one of New York Times Readers’ Favorite Books of 2017 Winner of the 2018 Goldsboro Books Glass Bell Award From the beloved New York Times bestselling author of The Boy In the Striped Pajamas, a sweeping, heartfelt saga about the course of one man's life, beginning and ending in post-war Ireland Cyril Avery is not a real Avery -- or at least, that's what his adoptive parents tell him. And he never will be. But if he isn't a real Avery, then who is he? Born out of wedlock to a teenage girl cast out from her rural Irish community and adopted by a well-to-do if eccentric Dublin couple via the intervention of a hunchbacked Redemptorist nun, Cyril is adrift in the world, anchored only tenuously by his heartfelt friendship with the infinitely more glamourous and dangerous Julian Woodbead. At the mercy of fortune and coincidence, he will spend a lifetime coming to know himself and where he came from - and over his many years, will struggle to discover an identity, a home, a country, and much more. In this, Boyne's most transcendent work to date, we are shown the story of Ireland from the 1940s to today through the eyes of one ordinary man. The Heart's Invisible Furies is a novel to make you laugh and cry while reminding us all of the redemptive power of the human spirit.

Eggshells

A Novel

Author: Caitriona Lally

Publisher: Melville House

ISBN: 1612195970

Category: Fiction

Page: 273

View: 8142

"First published in 2015 by Liberties Press."