Writing Dissent

Taking Radical Ideas from the Margins to the Mainstream

Author: Robert Jensen

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated

ISBN: N.A

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 150

View: 4944

Political activists with radical ideas often find themselves shut out of the mainstream news media. <I>Writing Dissent: Taking Radical Ideas from the Margins to the Mainstream is designed for activists who want to take on that challenge. Based on the author's experience as a journalist, activist, and academic, this book offers insight into radical politics and mass media and then moves on to describe practical strategies for breaking into the mainstream. Illustrated by the author's own opinion columns published in daily newspapers, <I>Writing Dissent explains how journalists work and how activists can successfully work with them.

Legacy of Dissent

40 years of writing from Dissent magazine

Author: Nicolaus Mills

Publisher: Fireside

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 463

View: 6302

Gathers articles about socialism, politics, American culture, racial issues, feminism, labor, and the Cold War

I Dissent

Great Opposing Opinions in Landmark Supreme Court Cases

Author: Mark V. Tushnet

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 9780807000366

Category: Law

Page: 229

View: 4983

A distinguished Supreme Court scholar introduces and explains sixteen influential cases from throughout the Court's history and offers a sense of what could have developed if the dissents were instead the majority opinions, looking at each case in terms of its political, social, economic, and cultural context. Original.

Worlds of Dissent

Charter 77, The Plastic People of the Universe, and Czech Culture Under Communism

Author: Jonathan Bolton

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674064836

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 5564

Worlds of Dissent analyzes the myths of Czech resistance popularized by Western journalists and historians, and replaces these heroic victory narratives with a picture of the struggle against state repression as dissidents themselves understood and lived it. Their diaries, letters, and essays convey the texture of dissent in a closed society.

Popular Dissent, Human Agency and Global Politics

Author: Roland Bleiker

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521778299

Category: Political Science

Page: 289

View: 4413

Popular dissent, such as street demonstrations and civil disobedience, has become increasingly transnational in nature and scope. As a result, a local act of resistance can acquire almost immediately a much larger, cross-territorial dimension. This book draws upon a broad and innovative range of sources to scrutinise this central but often neglected aspect of global politics. Through case studies that span from Renaissance perceptions of human agency to the collapse of the Berlin Wall, the author examines how the theory and practice of popular dissent has emerged and evolved during the modern period. Dissent, he argues, is more than just transnational. It has become an important 'transversal' phenomenon: an array of diverse political practices which not only cross national boundaries, but also challenge the spatial logic through which these boundaries frame international relations.

The Great Dissent

How Oliver Wendell Holmes Changed His Mind--and Changed the History of Free Speech in America

Author: Thomas Healy

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0805094563

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 322

View: 8512

Based on newly discovered letters and memos, this riveting scholarly history of the conservative justice who became a free-speech advocate and established the modern understanding of the First Amendment reconstructs his journey from free-speech skeptic to First Amendment hero. (This book was previously featured in Forecast.)

Sex, Nation, and Dissent in Irish Writing

Author: Eibhear Walshe

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312174477

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 291

View: 3877

This pioneering collection of essays sets out to examine the relationship between nationalism and sexual identity and argues that literary expressions of sexual dissidence in Ireland cannot be abstracted from Ireland's experience of colonization.

Dissent from War

Author: Robert L. Ivie

Publisher: Kumarian Press

ISBN: 1565492404

Category: Political Science

Page: 241

View: 2236

The rhetorical presumption of war's necessity makes violence regrettable, but seemingly sane, and functions to shame anyone who opposes military action. Ivie proposes that the presence of dissent is actually a healthy sign of democratic citizenship, and a responsible and productive act, which has been dangerously miscast as a threat to national security. Ivie, a former US Navy petty officer, puts a microscope to the language of war supporters throughout history and follows the lives and memories of soldiers and anti-war activists who have dealt with degrees of confusion and guilt about their opposition to war. Arguing that informed dissent plays out largely in the realm of rhetoric, he equips readers with strategies for resisting the dehumanizing language used in war propaganda. Through his careful study of language strategies, he makes it possible to foster a community where dissenting voices are valued and vital.

The Dissent Papers

The Voices of Diplomats in the Cold War and Beyond

Author: Hannah Gurman

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231530358

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 1839

Beginning with the Cold War and concluding with the 2003 invasion of Iraq, Hannah Gurman explores the overlooked opposition of U.S. diplomats to American foreign policy in the latter half of the twentieth century. During America's reign as a dominant world power, U.S. presidents and senior foreign policy officials largely ignored or rejected their diplomats' reports, memos, and telegrams, especially when they challenged key policies relating to the Cold War, China, and the wars in Vietnam and Iraq. The Dissent Papers recovers these diplomats' invaluable perspective and their commitment to the transformative power of diplomatic writing. Gurman showcases the work of diplomats whose opposition enjoyed some success. George Kennan, John Stewart Service, John Paton Davies, George Ball, and John Brady Kiesling all caught the attention of sitting presidents and policymakers, achieving temporary triumphs yet ultimately failing to change the status quo. Gurman follows the circulation of documents within the State Department, the National Security Council, the C.I.A., and the military, and she details the rationale behind "The Dissent Channel," instituted by the State Department in the 1970s, to both encourage and contain dissent. Advancing an alternative narrative of modern U.S. history, she connects the erosion of the diplomatic establishment and the weakening of the diplomatic writing tradition to larger political and ideological trends while, at the same time, foreshadowing the resurgent significance of diplomatic writing in the age of Wikileaks.

Woman and the Feminine in Medieval and Early Modern Scottish Writing

Author: Evelyn S. Newlyn

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230502202

Category: Social Science

Page: 238

View: 9423

This collection is the first critical and theoretical study of women as the subjects of writing and as writers in Medieval and Early-Modern Scottish literature. The essays draw on a diverse range of literary, historical, cultural and religious sources in Scots, Gaelic and English to discover the complex ways in which 'Woman' was represented and by which women represented themselves as creative subjects. Woman and the Feminine in Medieval and Early Modern Scottish Writing brings to light previously unknown writing by women in the early modern period and offers as well new interpretations of early Scottish texts from feminist and theoretical perspectives.

Loyal Dissent

Memoir of a Catholic Theologian

Author: Charles E. Curran

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN: 9781589013636

Category: Religion

Page: 314

View: 5762

Loyal Dissent is the candid and inspiring story of a Catholic priest and theologian who, despite being stripped of his right to teach as a Catholic theologian by the Vatican, remains committed to the Catholic Church. Over a nearly fifty-year career, Charles E. Curran has distinguished himself as the most well-known and the most controversial Catholic moral theologian in the United States. On occasion, he has disagreed with official church teachings on subjects such as contraception, homosexuality, divorce, abortion, moral norms, and the role played by the hierarchical teaching office in moral matters. Throughout, however, Curran has remained a committed Catholic, a priest working for the reform of a pilgrim church. His positions, he insists, are always in accord with the best understanding of Catholic theology and always dedicated to the good of the church. In 1986, years of clashes with church authorities finally culminated in a decision by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, headed by then-Cardinal Josef Ratzinger, that Curran was neither suitable nor eligible to be a professor of Catholic theology. As a result of that Vatican condemnation, he was fired from his teaching position at Catholic University of America and, since then, no Catholic university has been willing to hire him. Yet Curran continues to defend the possibility of legitimate dissent from those teachings of the Catholic faith—not core or central to it—that are outside the realm of infallibility. In word and deed, he has worked in support of more academic freedom in Catholic higher education and for a structural change in the church that would increase the role of the Catholic community—from local churches and parishes to all the baptized people of God. In this poignant and passionate memoir, Curran recounts his remarkable story from his early years as a compliant, pre-Vatican II Catholic through decades of teaching and writing and a transformation that has brought him today to be recognized as a leader of progressive Catholicism throughout the world.

North Carolina Reports

Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Court of North Carolina

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law reports, digests, etc

Page: N.A

View: 8398

Cases argued and determined in the Supreme Court of North Carolina.

I Dissent

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark (With Audio Recording)

Author: Debbie Levy

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1481465600

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 40

View: 8015

Get to know celebrated Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg—in the first picture book about her life—as she proves that disagreeing does not make you disagreeable! Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has spent a lifetime disagreeing: disagreeing with inequality, arguing against unfair treatment, and standing up for what’s right for people everywhere. This biographical picture book about the Notorious RBG, tells the justice’s story through the lens of her many famous dissents, or disagreements.

Fictions of Dissent

Reclaiming Authority in Transatlantic Women's Writing of the Late Nineteenth Century

Author: Sigrid Anderson Cordell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317324072

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 160

View: 948

Fin-de-siècle fiction by British female aesthetes and American women regionalists stages moments of rebellion when female characters rise up and insist on the right to maintain control of their creations. Cordell asserts that these revolutionary acts constitute a transatlantic conversation about aesthetic practice and creative ownership.

A Lifetime of Dissent

Passionate and Powerful Articles on the Critical Issues of Our Times

Author: Raymond J. Gonzales

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1425731325

Category: Political Science

Page: 319

View: 3187

A collection of articles previously published in other sources, spanning forty years of the author's career.

Dissent and the Supreme Court

Its Role in the Court's History and the Nation's Constitutional Dialogue

Author: Melvin I. Urofsky

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 030774132X

Category: Law

Page: 544

View: 4436

In his major work, acclaimed historian and judicial authority Melvin Urofsky examines the great dissents throughout the Court's long history. Constitutional dialogue is one of the ways in which we as a people reinvent and reinvigorate our democratic society. The Supreme Court has interpreted the meaning of the Constitution, acknowledged that the Court's majority opinions have not always been right, and initiated a critical discourse about what a particular decision should mean and fashioning subsequent decisions--largely through the power of dissent. Urofsky shows how the practice grew slowly but steadily, beginning with the infamous & now overturned case of Dred Scott v. Sanford (1857) during which Chief Justice Roger Taney's opinion upheld slaver and ending with the present age of incivility, in which reasoned dialogue seems less and less possible. Dissent on the court and off, Urofsky argues in this major work, has been a crucial ingredient in keeping the Constitution alive and must continue to be so.

Uncommon Dissent

Intellectuals Who Find Darwinism Unconvincing

Author: William Dembski

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1497648955

Category: Science

Page: 350

View: 2143

Recent years have seen the rise to prominence of ever more sophisticated philosophical and scientific critiques of the ideas marketed under the name of Darwinism. In Uncommon Dissent, mathematician and philosopher William A. Dembski brings together essays by leading intellectuals who find one or more aspects of Darwinism unpersuasive. As Dembski explains, Darwinism has gathered around itself an aura of invincibility that is inhospitable to rational discussion—to say the least: “Darwinism, its proponents assure us, has been overwhelmingly vindicated. Any resistance to it is futile and indicates bad faith or worse.” Indeed, those who question the Darwinian synthesis are supposed, in the famous formulation of Richard Dawkins, to be ignorant, stupid, insane, or wicked. The hostility of dogmatic Darwinians like Dawkins has not, however, prevented the advent of a growing cadre of scholarly critics of metaphysical Darwinism. The measured, thought-provoking essays in Uncommon Dissent make it increasingly obvious that these critics are not the brainwashed fundamentalist buffoons that Darwinism’s defenders suggest they are, but rather serious, skeptical, open-minded inquirers whose challenges pose serious questions about the viability of Darwinist ideology. The intellectual power of their contributions to Uncommon Dissent is bracing.