Women and Irish Diaspora Identities

Theories, Concepts and New Perspectives

Author: D. A. J. MacPherson,Mary J. Hickman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 152611240X

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 1607

Bringing together leading authorities on Irish women and migration, this book offers a significant reassessment of the place of women in the Irish diaspora. It compares Irish women across the globe over the last two centuries, setting this research in the context of recent theoretical developments in the study of diaspora. This collection demonstrates the important role played by women in the construction of Irish diasporic identities, assessing Irish women's experience in Britain, Canada, New Zealand and the United States. This book develops a conversation between other locations of the Irish diaspora and the dominant story about the USA and, in the process, emphasises the complexity and heterogeneity of Irish diasporan locations and experiences. This interdisciplinary collection, featuring chapters by Breda Gray, Louise Ryan and Bronwen Walter, will appeal to scholars and students of the Irish diaspora and women's migration.

Women and the Irish Diaspora

Author: Breda Gray

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415260015

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 2468

Women and the Irish Diaspora looks at the changing nature of national and cultural belonging both among women who have left Ireland and those who remain. It identifies new ways of thinking about Irish modernity by looking specifically at women's lives and their experiences of migration and diaspora. Based on original research with Irish women both in Ireland and in England, this book explores how questions of mobility and stasis are recast along gender, class, racial and generational lines. Through analyses of representations of 'the strong Irish mother', migrant women, 'the global Irish family' and celebrity culture, Breda Gray further unravels some of the complex relationships between femininity and Irish modernity(ies).

Diaspora, Identity and Religion

New Directions in Theory and Research

Author: Carolin Alfonso,Waltraud Kokot,Khachig Tölölyan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113439036X

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 1374

Over the last decade, concepts of diaspora and locality have gained complex new meanings in political discourse as well as in social and cultural studies. Diaspora, in particular, has acquired new meanings related to notions such as global deterritorialization, transnational migration and cultural hybridity. The authors discuss the key concepts and theory, focus on the meaning of religion both as a factor in forming diasporic social organisations, as well as shaping and maintaining diasporic identities, and the appropriation of space and place in history. It includes up to date research of the Caribbean, Irish, Armenian, African and Greek diasporas.

Gender, Migration, and the Public Sphere, 1850–2005

Author: Marlou Schrover,Eileen Yeo

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113523549X

Category: History

Page: 194

View: 9425

The decision to emigrate has historically held differing promises and costs for women and for men. Exploring theories of difference in labor market participation, network formation and the immigrant organising process, on belonging and diaspora, and a theory of ‘vulnerability,’ A Global History of Gender and Migration looks critically at two centuries of the migration experience from the perspectives of women and men separately and together. Uniquely investigating the subject globally over time, this book incorporates the history of migration in areas as far-flung as Yemen, Sudan, the Netherlands, France, Belgium, Poland, the Soviet Union, the US, and the UK, an approach that allows for patterns to emerge over time. A Global History of Gender and Migration further shows that although there are various points on which migrant men and women differ, and several theories exist to explain these differences, this comprehensive guide offers a unifying thesis on the theories and practice of migration, adding to our insight into the mechanisms underlying the creation of differences between migrant men and women.

Griffintown

Identity and Memory in an Irish Diaspora Neighbourhood

Author: Matthew Barlow

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 0774834366

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 2660

This vibrant biography of Griffintown, an inner-city Montreal neighbourhood, brings to life the history of Irish identity in the legendary enclave. As Irish immigration dwindled by the late nineteenth century, Irish culture in the city became diasporic, reflecting an imagined homeland. Focusing on the power of memory to shape community, Matthew Barlow finds that, despite sociopolitical pressures and a declining population, the spirit of this ethnic quarter was nurtured by the men and women who grew up there. Today, as Griffintown attracts renewed interest from developers, this textured analysis reveals how public memory defines our urban centres.

Made holy

Irish women religious at home and abroad

Author: Yvonne McKenna

Publisher: Irish Academic Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Religion

Page: 268

View: 9161

Based on their oral testimonies, Made Holy explores the attraction to religious life and experiences therein of over forty Irish nuns. It is a book about identity and an exploration of the ways in which women religious articulate a sense of self. Their accounts provide a means of investigating the disadvantaged position of women in Ireland during a particular period and the decisions some women made in response. Interpreting them as legitimate but overlooked stories of migration, the book probes the wider theme of social change in Ireland and productively explores the interrelationship of gender, religion and diaspora, casting light on Irish culture and its neglected histories. Made Holy engages with several current debates surrounding Irishness, Irish womanhood, diaspora and identity. Informed by a wide variety of methodological approaches and transcultural perspectives it is truly interdisciplinary and makes a significant contribution not only to the study of Irish and Irish women's history but sociology, (Irish) cultural studies, post-colonial studies, feminist theory and women's studies more generally. It will be directly relevant to modern Irish women's history study, Irish sociology courses and courses exploring Irish and general em/im/migration. In addition, because of the methodology employed, it will prove useful to qualitative research methods and oral history courses.

Geographies of Muslim Identities

Diaspora, Gender and Belonging

Author: Peter Hopkins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131712913X

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 9715

In recent years, geographies of identities, including those of ethnicity, religion, 'race' and gender, have formed an increasing focus of contemporary human geography. The events of September 11th, 2001 particularly illustrated the ways in which identities can be transformed across time and space by both global and local events of a social, cultural, political and economic nature. Such transformations have also demonstrated the temporal and spatial construction of hate and fear, and of increasing incidences of 'Islamophobia' through the construction of Muslims as 'the Other'. As the social scientific study of religion continues to be marginalized within mainstream scholarship, there remains an important gap in the literature. This timely book addresses this gap by collecting a range of cutting-edge contributions from the social, cultural, political, historical and economic sub-disciplines of geography, together with writings from gender studies, cultural studies and leisure studies where research has revealed a strong spatial dimension to the construction, representation, contestation and reworking of Muslim identities. The contributors illustrate the ways in which such identities are constructed, represented, negotiated and contested in everyday life in a wide variety of international contexts, focusing upon issues connected with diaspora, gender and belonging.

Outsiders Inside

Whiteness, Place and Irish Women

Author: Bronwen Walter

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113480461X

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 6479

Notions of diaspora are central to contemporary debates about 'race', ethnicity, identity and nationalism. Yet the Irish diaspora, one of the oldest and largest, is often excluded on the grounds of 'whiteness'. Outsiders Inside explores the themes of displacement and the meanings of home for these women and their descendants. Juxtaposing the visibility of Irish women in the United States with their marginalization in Britain, Bronwen Walter challenges linear notions of migration and assimilation by demonstrating that two forms of identification can be held simultaneously. In an age when the Northern Ireland peace process is rapidly changing global perceptions of Irishness, Outsiders Inside moves the empirical study of the Irish diaspora out of the 'ghetto' of Irish Studies and into the mainstream, challenging theorists and policy-makers to pay attention to the issue of white diversity.

Women and Exile in Contemporary Irish Fiction

Author: Ellen McWilliams

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137314206

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 243

View: 9810

Women and Exile in Contemporary Irish Fiction examines how contemporary Irish authors have taken up the history of the Irish woman migrant. It situates these writers' work in relation to larger discourses of exile in the Irish literary tradition and examines how they engage with the complex history of Irish emigration.

Women and the Irish Nation

Gender, Culture and Irish Identity, 1890-1914

Author: J. MacPherson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137284587

Category: History

Page: 214

View: 6416

At the turn of the twentieth century women played a key role in debates about the nature of the Irish nation. Examining women's participation in nationalist and rural reform groups, this book is an important contribution to our understanding of Irish identity in the prelude to revolution and how it was shaped by women.

Women’s Writing, Englishness and National and Cultural Identity

The Mobile Woman and the Migrant Voice, 1938-62

Author: M. Joannou

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137265299

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 228

View: 4565

An original mapping of women's writing in the 1940s and 1950s, this book looks at Englishness and national identity in women's writing and includes writing from Scotland, Wales, Ireland the Indian subcontinent and Africa. The authors discussed include Virginia Woolf, Daphne Du Maurier, Doris Lessing and Muriel Spark.

New Frontiers In Women's Studies

Knowledge, Identity And Nationalism

Author: Mary Maynard,June Purvis

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1135747059

Category: Social Science

Page: 268

View: 1298

This text reveals the diversities which continue to shape women's beliefs and experiences. It includes debates on women and nationalisms, women and social policy, sexuality, black studies and ethnic studies, women and education, women and cultural production and women's studies and gender studies.

Home, Identity, and Mobility in Contemporary Diasporic Fiction

Author: Jopi Nyman

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN: 9042026901

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 3890

This innovative volume discusses the significance of home and global mobility in contemporary diasporic fiction written in English. Through analyses of central diasporic and migrant writers in the United Kingdom and the United States, the timely volume exposes the importance of home and its reconstruction in diasporic literature in the era of globalization and increasing transnational mobility. Through wide-ranging case studies dealing with a variety of black British and ethnic American writers,Home, Identity, and Mobility in Contemporary Diasporic Fiction shows how new identities and homes are constructed in the migrants' new homelands. The volume examines how diasporic novels inscribe hybridity and multiplicity in formerly uniform spaces and subvert traditional understandings of nation, citizenship, and history. Particular emphasis is on the ways in which diasporic fictions appropriate and transform traditional literary genres such as theBildungsroman and the picaresque to explore the questions of migration and transformation. The authors discussed include Caryl Phillips, Jamal Mahjoub, Mike Phillips, Hari Kunzru, Kamila Shamsie, Benjamin Zephaniah, Abdulrazak Gurnah, Cynthia Kadohata, Ana Castillo, Diana Abu-Jaber, and Bharati Mukherjee. The volume is of particular interest to all scholars and students of post-colonial and ethnic literatures in English.

Emigrant Players

Sport and the Irish Diaspora

Author: Paul Darby,David Hassan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131796845X

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 218

View: 5748

Ireland and its inhabitants have often been described as being ‘sports mad’. As a relatively small geographical entity, Ireland, north and south, has produced a disproportionately high number of world class sports men and women who have excelled at the highest levels of their chosen sport. The significance of sport in Ireland though extends far beyond the achievements of such individuals. Sport has historically assumed a centrality in the lives of the island’s inhabitants, a fact that can be measured by the numbers and commitment of participants as well as the emotional and financial investment of fans. This book seeks to address the ways in which Irish aptitude and ebullience for sport has manifested itself in those parts of the world that have or have had relatively large Irish communities. The first part of the book explores the diffusion of Gaelic games to a number of centres of Irish immigration and examines the social, economic, political and psychological impact that these games had in helping the Diaspora adjust to life in what were often inhospitable environs. The second part of the book extends the analysis by examining the contribution of Irish sports men and women to the sports culture that they encountered in their new homes and assessing the ways in which their involvement in these sports allowed them to come to terms with and make their way in their new locales. This book was previously published as a special issue of the journal, Sport in Society

Irish Women and Irish Migration

Author: Patrick O'Sullivan

Publisher: Burns & Oates

ISBN: 9780718501150

Category: Ireland

Page: 238

View: 7429

For significant periods, the majority of Irish emigrants were women. This volume begins with an introduction which explores the connections between women's studies and Irish studies, and includes a women's history reinterpretation of the myths of the Wild Geese. Five chapters on the 19th century look at the motivations and work experiences of women emigrants to the United States, emigration schemes involving Irish pauper women, the experiences of Catholic and Protestant Irish women in Liverpool, and at female-headed households.

The Global Dimensions of Irish Identity

Race, Nation, and the Popular Press, 1840-1880

Author: Cian T. McMahon

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469620111

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 9723

Though Ireland is a relatively small island on the northeastern fringe of the Atlantic, 70 million people worldwide--including some 45 million in the United States--claim it as their ancestral home. In this wide-ranging, ambitious book, Cian T. McMahon explores the nineteenth-century roots of this transnational identity. Between 1840 and 1880, 4.5 million people left Ireland to start new lives abroad. Using primary sources from Ireland, Australia, and the United States, McMahon demonstrates how this exodus shaped a distinctive sense of nationalism. By doggedly remaining loyal to both their old and new homes, he argues, the Irish helped broaden the modern parameters of citizenship and identity. From insurrection in Ireland to exile in Australia to military service during the American Civil War, McMahon's narrative revolves around a group of rebels known as Young Ireland. They and their fellow Irish used weekly newspapers to construct and express an international identity tailored to the fluctuating world in which they found themselves. Understanding their experience sheds light on our contemporary debates over immigration, race, and globalization.

Wurzeln

Roman

Author: Alex Haley

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783596224487

Category:

Page: 717

View: 8629


Sporting Nationalisms

Identity, Ethnicity, Immigration and Assimilation

Author: Mike Cronin,David Mayall

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135777098

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 240

View: 7823

This volume examines the ways in which sport shapes the experiences of various immigrant and minority groups and, in particular, looks at the relationship between sport, ethnic identity and ethnic relations. The articles in this volume are concerned primarily with British, American and Australian sporting traditions and the themes covered include the consolidation of ethnic identity in host societies through participation immigrant sports and exclusive sporting organizations, assimilation into host' societies through participation in indigenous, national sports, and the construction by outsiders of separate ethnic identities according to sporting criteria.