Wem gehört die Zukunft?

"Du bist nicht der Kunde der Internetkonzerne. Du bist ihr Produkt."

Author: Jaron Lanier

Publisher: Hoffmann und Campe

ISBN: 3455851134

Category: Political Science

Page: 464

View: 2009

"Du bist nicht der Kunde der Internetkonzerne. Du bist ihr Produkt." Spätestens seit den Enthüllungen des Whistleblowers Edward Snowden ist klar: Die "schöne neue Welt" nimmt Gestalt an, und es wird höchste Zeit, ihr etwas entgegenzusetzen. Internetpionier und Cyberguru Jaron Lanier liefert eine profunde Analyse der aktuellen Trends in der Netzwerkökonomie, die sich in Richtung Totalüberwachung und Ausbeutung der Massen bewegt. Der Bestseller aus den USA endlich auf Deutsch!

Who Owns the Future?

Author: Jaron Lanier

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451654979

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 411

View: 5674

Evaluates the negative impact of digital network technologies on the economy and particularly the middle class, citing challenges to employment and personal wealth while exploring the potential of a new information economy.

Zehn Gründe, warum du deine Social Media Accounts sofort löschen musst

Author: Jaron Lanier

Publisher: Hoffmann und Campe

ISBN: 345500492X

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 1842

»Um „Zehn Gründe...“ zu lesen, reicht ein einziger Grund: Jaron Lanier. Am wichtigsten Mahner vor Datenmissbrauch, Social-Media-Verdummung und der fatalen Umsonst-Mentalität im Netz führt in diesen Tagen kein Weg vorbei.« Frank Schätzing Jaron Lanier, Tech-Guru und Vordenker des Internets, liefert zehn bestechende Gründe, warum wir mit Social Media Schluss machen müssen. Facebook, Google & Co. überwachen uns, manipulieren unser Verhalten, machen Politik unmöglich und uns zu ekligen, rechthaberischen Menschen. Social Media ist ein allgegenwärtiger Käfig geworden, dem wir nicht entfliehen können. Lanier hat ein aufrüttelndes Buch geschrieben, das seine Erkenntnisse als Insider des Silicon Valleys wiedergibt und dazu anregt, das eigenen Verhalten in den sozialen Netzwerken zu überdenken. Wenn wir den Kampf mit dem Wahnsinn unserer Zeit nicht verlieren wollen, bleibt uns nur eine Möglichkeit: Löschen wir all unsere Accounts! Ein Buch, das jeder lesen muss, der sich im Netz bewegt! »Ein unglaublich gutes, dringendes und wichtiges Buch« Zadie Smith

Who Owns the Sky?

Our Common Assets and the Future of Capitalism

Author: Peter Barnes

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN: 9781610914017

Category: Air quality management

Page: 172

View: 732


Gadget

Warum die Zukunft uns noch braucht

Author: Jaron Lanier

Publisher: Suhrkamp Verlag

ISBN: 3518744305

Category: Political Science

Page: 247

View: 726

Jaron Lanier, der den Begriff der “virtuellen Realität“ erfunden hat, stellt in seinem neuen Buch dar, wie das World Wide Web die Individualität jedes einzelnen von uns bedroht, vermindert oder gar zerstört. Wie kein zweiter hat Jaron Lanier die revolutionären Veränderungen vorausgesagt, die mit dem Internet einhergehen und die alle Aspekte unseres Lebens betreffen: Arbeit und Freizeit, Handel und Wandel, Kommunikation und Sexualität, das kollektive wie das individuelle Leben. Wie kein zweiter warnt er vor den Gefahren des permanenten Online-Seins, vor dem Verlust an Subjektivität in der Anonymität des Netzes. Die eigene Intelligenz und das Urteil des einzelnen von Computeralgorrithmen bedroht. Technologisches Design, das File-Sharing, der Kult ums Facebook, die permanente Erreichbarkeit und oft filterlose Präsentation des Eigenen bedrohen die Kultur des Dialogs, der Eigenheit und Verborgenheit, aus denen die Individualität sich speist. Lanier zeigt die Bedrohungen in vielen Facetten auf und plädiert für einen neuen maßvollen Umgang mit dem Internet. Computer sollen, so sein leidenschaftliches Plädoyer, die Humanität verbessern, nicht ersetzen. Jaron Lanier gilt als Begründer der „virtuelle Realität“ Technologie. Er lehrt als „Scholar at Large for Live Labs, Microsoft Corporation“ in Berkeley, Kalifornien, und ist als Musiker und bildender Künstler international hervorgetreten. Seine Beiträge fanden auch in der deutschen Presse großes Echo. „Ein provozierendes, gewiss kontroverses Buch . . . Leuchtend, kraftvoll, und überzeugend.“ The New York Times „Poetisch und prophetisch . . . das wichtigste Buch des Jahres.“ The Times (London)

Who Owns the Future?

Author: Dogukan Akbulut

Publisher:

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 8231

*THE DAZZLING NEW MASTERWORK FROM THE PROPHET OF SILICON VALLEY* Jaron Lanier is the bestselling author of You Are Not a Gadget, the father of virtual reality, and one of the most influential thinkers of our time. For decades, Lanier has drawn on his expertise and experience as a computer scientist, musician, and digital media pioneer to predict the revolutionary ways in which technology is transforming our culture. Who Owns the Future? is a visionary reckoning with the effects network technologies have had on our economy. Lanier asserts that the rise of digital networks led our economy into recession and decimated the middle class. Now, as technology flattens more and more industries—from media to medicine to manufacturing—we are facing even greater challenges to employment and personal wealth. But there is an alternative to allowing technology to own our future. In this ambitious and deeply humane book, Lanier charts the path toward a new information economy that will stabilize the middle class and allow it to grow. It is time for ordinary people to be rewarded for what they do and share on the web. Insightful, original, and provocative, Who Owns the Future? is necessary reading for everyone who lives a part of their lives online. Amazon.com Review An Amazon Best Book of the Month, May 2013: Jaron Lanier's last book, You Are Not a Gadget, was an influential criticism of Web 2.0's crowd-sourced backbone. In Who Owns the Future?, Lanier is interested in how network technologies affect our culture, economy, and collective soul. Lanier is talking about pretty heady stuff--the monopolistic power of big tech companies (dubbed "Siren Servers"), the flattening of the middle class, the obscuring of humanity--but he has a gift for explaining sophisticated concepts with clarity. In fact, what separates Lanier from a lot of techno-futurists is his emphasis on the maintaining humanism and accessibility in technology. In the most ambitious part of the book, Lanier expresses what he believes to be the ideal version of the networked future--one that is built on two-way connections instead of one-way relationships, allowing content, media, and other innovations to be more easily attributed (including a system of micro-payments that lead back to its creator). Is the two-way networked vision of the internet proposed in Who Owns the Future quixotic? Even Lanier seems unsure, but his goal here is to establish a foundation for which we should strive. At one point, Lanier jokingly asks sci-fi author William Gibson to write something that doesn't depict technology as so menacing. Gibson replies, "Jaron, I tried. But it's coming out dark." Lanier is able to conjure a future that's much brighter, and hopefully in his imagination, we are moving closer to that. --Kevin Nguyen Q&A with Jaron Lanier Q. Years ago, in the early days of networking, you and your friends asserted that information should be free. What made you change your tune? A. In the big picture, a great new technology that makes the world more efficient should result in waves of new opportunity. That’s what happened with, say, electricity, telephones, cars, plumbing, fertilizers, vaccinations, and many other examples. Why on earth have the early years of the network revolution been associated with recessions, austerity, jobless recoveries, and loss of social mobility? Something has clearly gone wrong. The old ideas about information being free in the information age ended up screwing over everybody except the owners of the very biggest computers. The biggest computers turned into spying and behavior modification operations, which concentrated wealth and power. Sharing information freely, without traditional rewards like royalties or paychecks, was supposed to create opportunities for brave, creative individuals. Instead, I have watched each successive generation of young journalists, artists, musicians, photographers, and writers face harsher and harsher odds. The perverse effect of opening up information has been that the status of a young person’s parents matters more and more, since it’s so hard to make one’s way. Q. Throughout history, technological revolutions have caused unemployment but also brought about new types of jobs to replace the old ones. What’s different today? A. Cars can now drive themselves, and cloud services can translate passages between languages well enough to be of practical use. But the role of people in these technologies turned out to be a surprise. Back in the 1950s, the fantasy in the computer science world was that smart scientists would achieve machine intelligence and profound levels of automation, but that never worked. Instead, vast amounts of “big data” gathered from real people is rehashed to create automation. There are many, many real people behind the curtain. This should be great news for the future of employment! Multitudes of people are needed in order for robots to speak, drive cars, or perform operations. The only problem is that as the information age is dawning, the ideology of bright young people and newfangled plutocrats alike holds that information should be free. Q. Who does own the future? What’s up for grabs that will affect our future livelihoods? A. The answer is indeed up for grabs. If we keep on doing things as we are, the answer is clear: The future will be narrowly owned by the people who run the biggest, best connected computers, which will usually be found in giant, remote cloud computing farms. The answer I am promoting instead is that the future should be owned broadly by everyone who contributes data to the cloud, as robots and other machines animated by cloud software start to drive our vehicles, care for us when we’re sick, mine our natural resources, create the physical objects we use, and so on, as the 21st century progresses. Right now, most people are only gaining informal benefits from advances in technology, like free internet services, while those who own the biggest computers are concentrating formal benefits to an unsustainable degree. Q. What is a “Siren Server” and how does it function? A. I needed a broad name for the gargantuan cloud computer services that are concentrating wealth and influence in our era. They go by so many names! There are national intelligence agencies, the famous Silicon Valley companies with nursery school names, the stealthy high finance schemes, and others. All these schemes are quite similar. The biggest computers can predictably calculate wealth and clout on a broad, statistical level. For instance, an insurance company might use massive amounts of data to only insure people who are unlikely to get sick. The problem is that the risk and loss that can be avoided by having the biggest computer still exist. Everyone else must pay for the risk and loss that the Siren Server can avoid. The interesting thing about the original Homeric Sirens was that they didn’t actually attack sailors. The fatal peril was that sailors volunteered to grant the sirens control of the interaction. That’s what we’re all doing with the biggest computing schemes. Q. As a solution to the economic problems caused by digital networks, you assert that each one of us should be paid for what we do and share online. How would that work? A. We’ve all contributed to the fortunes of big Silicon Valley schemes, big finance schemes, and all manner of other schemes which are driven by computation over a network. But our contributions were deliberately forgotten. This is partly due to the ideology of copying without a trace that my friends and I mistakenly thought would lead to a fairer world, back in the day. The error we made was simple: Not all computers are created equal. What is clear is that networks could remember where the value actually came from, which is from a very broad range of people. I sketch a way that universal micropayments might solve the problem, though I am not attempting to present a utopian solution. Instead I hope to deprogram people from the “open” ideal to think about networks more broadly. I am certain that once the conversation escapes the bounds of what has become an orthodoxy, better ideas will come about. Q. Who Owns the Future seems like two books in one. Does it seem that way to you? A. If all I wanted was sympathy and popularity, I am sure that a critique by itself—without a proposal for a solution—would have been more effective. It’s true that the fixes put forward in Who Owns the Future are ambitious, but they are presented within an explicitly modest wrapping. I am hoping to make the world safer for diverse ideas about the future. Our times are terribly conformist. For instance, one is either “red” or “blue,” or is accepted by the “open culture” crowd or not. I seek to bust open such orthodoxies by showing that other ideas are possible. So I present an intentionally rough sketch of an alternate future that doesn’t match up with any of the present orthodoxies. A reality-based, compassionate world is one in which criticism is okay. I dish it out, but I also lay my tender neck out before you. Q. You’re a musician in addition to being a computer scientist. What insight has that given you? A. In the 1990s I was signed to a big label, but as a minor artist. I had to compete in an esoteric niche market, as an experimental classical/jazz high prestige sort of artist. That world was highly competitive and professional, and inspired an intense level of effort from me. I assumed that losing the moneyed side of the recording business would not make all that much of a difference, but I was wrong. I no longer bother to release music. The reason is that it now feels like a vanity market. Self-promotion has become the primary activity of many of my musician friends. Yuk. When the music is heard, it’s often in the context of automatically generated streams from some cloud service, so the listener doesn’t even know it’s you. Successful music tends to be quite conformist to some pre-existing category, because that way it fits better into the automatic streaming schemes. I miss competing in the intense NYC music scene. Who keeps you honest when the world is drowning in insincere flattery? So here I am writing books. Hello book critics! Review “Daringly original . . . Lanier’s sharp, accessible style and opinions make Who Owns the Future? terrifically inviting.” (Janet Maslin, The New York Times) “Lanier’s career as a computer scientist is entwined in the central economic story of our time, the rapid advance of computation and networking. . . . [Who Owns the Future?] not only makes a convincing diagnosis of a widespread problem, but also answers a need for moonshot thinking.” (The New Republic) "Lanier has a mind as boundless as the internet . . . [He is] the David Foster Wallace of tech." (London Evening Standard) “Lanier has a poet’s sensibility and his book reads like a hallucinogenic reverie, full of entertaining haiku-like observations and digressions.” (Financial Times) "Everyone complains about the Internet, but no one does anything about it . . . except for Jaron Lanier." (Neal Stephenson, bestselling author of Reamde and Cryptonomicon) "Who Owns the Future? explains what’s wrong with our digital economy, and tells us how to fix it. Listen up!” (George Dyson, bestselling author of Turing's Cathedral) "Who Owns the Future? is a deeply original and sometimes startling read. Lanier does not simply question the dominant narrative of our times, but picks it up by the neck and shakes it. A refreshing and important book that will make you see the world differently." (Tim Wu, author of The Master Switch) “This book is rare. It looks at technology with an insider’s knowledge, wisdom, and deep caring about human beings. It’s badly needed.” (W. Brian Arthur, economist and author of The Nature of Technology) "One of the triumphs of Lanier's intelligent and subtle book is its inspiring portrait of the kind of people that a democratic information economy would produce. His vision implies that if we are allowed to lead absorbing, properly remunerated lives, we will likewise outgrow our addiction to consumerism and technology." (The Guardian)

Die Vernetzung der Welt

Ein Blick in unsere Zukunft

Author: Eric Schmidt,Jared Cohen

Publisher: Rowohlt Verlag GmbH

ISBN: 3644030618

Category: Political Science

Page: 448

View: 1769

Welche Konsequenzen wird es haben, wenn in Zukunft die überwiegende Mehrheit der Weltbevölkerung online ist? Wenn Informationstechnologien so allgegenwärtig sind wie Elektrizität? Was bedeutet das für die Politik, die Wirtschaft – und für uns selbst? Diese Fragen beantwortet ein außergewöhnliches Autorenduo: Eric Schmidt, der Mann, der Google zu einem Weltunternehmen gemacht hat, und Jared Cohen, ehemaliger Berater von Hillary Clinton und Condoleezza Rice und jetzt Chef von Googles Denkfabrik. In diesem aufregenden Buch führen sie uns die Chancen und Gefahren jener eng vernetzten Welt vor Augen, die die meisten von uns noch erleben werden. Es ist die sehr konkrete Vision einer Zukunft, die bereits begonnen hat. Und ein engagiertes Plädoyer dafür, sie jetzt zu gestalten – weil Technologie der leitenden Hand des Menschen bedarf, um Positives zu bewirken.

Das Buch Henoch

Author: Johannes Flemming,Ludwig Radermacher

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 3110299070

Category: Religion

Page: 171

View: 2059


An Executive Summary of Jaron Lanier's 'Who Owns the Future?'

Author: A. D. Thibeault

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 9781499129564

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 26

View: 6497

A full executive summary of 'Who Owns the Future?' by Jaron Lanier. This is not a chapter-by-chapter summary. Rather, the author takes an holistic approach, reorganizing and breaking down the content for easier understanding where necessary, and cutting out the repetition.

Wenn Träume erwachsen werden

Ein Blick auf das digitale Zeitalter

Author: Jaron Lanier

Publisher: Hoffmann und Campe

ISBN: 3455851428

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 2450

Jaron Laniers Essays erstmals als Buch - ein einzigartiger Einblick in den Ideenkosmos des großen Internetvisionärs Mit Kreativität und visionärem Blick, der nie kulturpessimistisch ist, sondern sich aus dem Wissen um Chancen und Fluch der neuen Technologien speist, denkt er diese in die Zukunft weiter. Lanier, der als Vater des Begriffs »Virtuelle Realität« gilt, hat 1983 sein erstes Computerspiel entwickelt. 1985 machte er sich mit Freunden selbstständig, um Technologien für die neue, virtuelle Welt zu entwickeln. Ab der Jahrtausendwende hat sich Lanier dann zunehmend kritisch mit den Heilversprechen der digitalen Welt auseinander gesetzt. Seine Forschungen und Entdeckungen hat er von Beginn an mit Essays begleitet, in denen er seine Errungenschaft in ihren Implikationen für die Gesellschaft überprüft und einen Blick in die Zukunft richtet.

21 Lektionen für das 21. Jahrhundert

Author: Yuval Noah Harari

Publisher: C.H.Beck

ISBN: 3406727794

Category: History

Page: 459

View: 2321

Yuval Noah Harari ist der Weltstar unter den Historikern. In «Eine kurze Geschichte der Menschheit» erzählte er vom Aufstieg des Homo Sapiens zum Herrn der Welt. In «Homo Deus» ging es um die Zukunft unserer Spezies. Sein neues Buch schaut auf das Hier und Jetzt und konfrontiert uns mit den drängenden Fragen unserer Zeit. Wie unterscheiden wir Wahrheit und Fiktion im Zeitalter der Fake News? Was sollen wir unseren Kindern beibringen? Wie können wir in unserer unübersichtlichen Welt moralisch handeln? Wie bewahren wir Freiheit und Gleichheit im 21. Jahrhundert? Seit Jahrtausenden hat die Menschheit über den Fragen gebrütet, wer wir sind und was wir mit unserem Leben anfangen sollen. Doch jetzt setzen uns die heraufziehende ökologische Krise, die wachsende Bedrohung durch Massenvernichtungswaffen und der Aufstieg neuer disruptiver Technologien unter Zeitdruck. Bald schon wird irgendjemand darüber entscheiden müssen, wie wir die Macht nutzen, die künstliche Intelligenz und Biotechnologie bereit halten. Dieses Buch will möglichst viele Menschen dazu anregen, sich an den großen Debatten unserer Zeit zu beteiligen, damit die Antworten nicht von den blinden Kräften des Marktes gegeben werden.

Mein Kampf

Author: Adolf Hitler

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781983638206

Category:

Page: 822

View: 847

Published in the German language, this is the infamous Main Kampf, by Adolf Hitler.

Die Parabel vom Sämann

Roman

Author: Octavia E. Butler

Publisher: Heyne Verlag

ISBN: 3641179564

Category: Fiction

Page: 295

View: 2324

Immerwährender Wandel Kalifornien im Jahre 2025: Die Regierung ist handlungsunfähig, der Bundesstaat leidet unter Wasserarmut. Wer es sich leisten kann, lebt hinter dicken Mauern zum Schutz vor den kriminellen Banden, die ohne Gnade rauben, vergewaltigen und morden. In dieser Welt wächst die fünfzehnjährige Lauren Olamina als Tochter eines Baptistenpriesters auf. Sie ist hyperempathisch – sie fühlt die Schmerzen anderer am eigenen Leib. Als ihre kleine Gemeinde angegriffen und zerstört wird, macht sie sich auf eine gefährliche Reise nach Norden, um ihren Platz in dieser Welt zu finden ...

Anbruch einer neuen Zeit

Wie Virtual Reality unser Leben und unsere Gesellschaft verändert

Author: Jaron Lanier

Publisher: Hoffmann und Campe

ISBN: 3455004016

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 5745

»Pflichtlektüre für alle, die wissen wollen, warum unsere Gesellschaft so ist, wie sie ist, und wohin sie steuert.« The Economist BOOK OF THE YEAR 2017: The Wall Street Journal & The Economist Jaron Lanier, Tech-Guru und Vater der Virtual Reality, gibt einen faszinierenden Einblick in sein Leben, die Anfänge des Silicon Valleys, den großen Traum von der virtuellen Realität, und warum sie in Kürze unser aller Leben grundlegend verändern wird. In einem fesselnden Mix aus Autobiografie, Fachwissen und philosophischen Überlegungen schildert er seinen außergewöhnlichen Werdegang – von seiner ärmlichen Kindheit als Kind von Holocaust-Überlebenden in der Wüste New Mexicos, über die ersten Schritte in der virtuellen Realität bis hin zu ihren modernen Einsatzmöglichkeiten. Sein neues Buch ist eine visionäre Liebeserklärung an eine Technologie, die ungeahnte Chancen bietet und gleichzeitig ein immenses Missbrauchspotential birgt. Dabei wirft er einen unvergleichlichen Blick darauf, was es im Angesicht unbegrenzter Möglichkeiten heißt, heute Mensch zu sein.

Cryptonomicon

Roman

Author: Neal Stephenson

Publisher: Manhattan

ISBN: 3894806915

Category: Fiction

Page: 1184

View: 9075

Während des Zweiten Weltkriegs legt Japan mit Unterstützung von Nazi-Deutschland eine gigantische Goldreserve an. Die Alliierten werden zwar auf verschlüsselte Mitteilungen aufmerksam, aber selbst ihren besten Kryptographen gelingt es nicht, den Code zu knacken. Mehr als ein halbes Jahrhundert später stößt eine Gruppe junger amerikanischer Unternehmer im Wrack eines U-Boots auf die Anzeichen einer riesigen Verschwörung und auf das Rätsel um einen verborgenen Schatz.

Die Trapp-Familie

von Welterfolg zu Welterfolg. II

Author: Maria Augusta Trapp

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 202

View: 3235