Who Lynched Willie Earle?

Preaching to Confront Racism

Author: William H. Willimon

Publisher: Abingdon Press

ISBN: 1501832522

Category: Religion

Page: 152

View: 5781

Pastors and leaders long to speak an effective biblical word into the contemporary social crisis of racial violence and black pain. They need a no-nonsense strategy rooted in actual ecclesial life, illuminated in this fine book by a trustworthy guide, Will Willimon, who uses the true story of pastor Hawley Lynn’s March of 1947 sermon, “Who Lynched Willie Earle?” as an opportunity to respond to the last lynching in Greenville, South Carolina and its implications for a more faithful proclamation of the Gospel today. By hearing black pain, naming white complicity, critiquing American exceptionalism/civil religion, inviting/challenging the church to respond, and attending to the voices of African American pastors and leaders, this book helps pastors of white, mainline Protestant churches preach effectively in situations of racial violence and dis-ease.

Fear of the Other

No Fear in Love

Author: William H. Willimon

Publisher: Abingdon Press

ISBN: 1501824767

Category: Religion

Page: N.A

View: 6561

In this no non-sense book, reliable spiritual guide, Will Willimon, invites readers to consider the gospel command to love (and not merely tolerate) those considered to be “Other” or outside mainstream Christian culture. Rooted in the faith of Israel and the Christian story and vision, Willimon brings a Wesleyan perspective to bear on what may be the hardest thing for people of faith to do: keeping and loving the "Other" as they are - without any need for them to become like us. Emphasizing biblical teaching to receive Others for who they are and their differences as gifts and mysteries bearing the grace of God, Willimon also offers a strong critique of the privileged who all too often rush to speak of reconciliation and evade the injustice of huge inequalities faced by foreigners and strangers - as well as the antagonism the stranger experiences. He identifies concrete, everyday ways persons are formed in welcoming others without annihilating their differences. Rooted in the New Testament understanding of Gentile outsiders grafted into the covenant community, Willimon invites readers to an on-the-ground faith that remembers the God who comes to us again and again through so-called outsiders, strangers, immigrants, and those without status. Beyond welcome, Christians must become “other” to the world, shaking off the dominant culture’s identity and privilege through practices of listening, humility, and understanding. “I love Will Willimon, and I love this book. Will writes with prophetic sarcasm, a touch of humor, plenty of self-effacement, and a pastor’s heart. And his words will make you laugh, cringe, cry, confess, and repent. This is a very timely book. I urge you, prospective reader, as you read this blurb on the back cover: buy and read it! You’ll be grateful you did.” —Adam Hamilton, senior pastor, The United Methodist Church of the Resurrection, Leawood, KS; author of Half Truths “This gutsy, biblically rich, theologically searing book by Willimon gigs everybody’s sacred cow. Not only is the one whom Christ loves Other but God is Other. The ground beneath us shakes the walls that divide us. If you are holed-up happy with people who look like you, don’t read this thing. It will screw up your world.” —Tex Sample, Robert B. and Kathleen Rogers Professor Emeritus of Church and Society, Saint Paul School of Theology, Leawood, KS “Timely and prophetic, Willimon’s call to love the Other will quickly take hold of your soul, changing your preaching and your life. This book is not just a reminder of our Christian calling to welcome the Other but a call to conversion, a new way of seeing the neighbor and a new way of being in the world God desperately loves.” —Karoline M. Lewis, Marbury E. Anderson Chair of Biblical Preaching, Luther Seminary, St. Paul, MN “Bishop Willimon’s new book should come with a warning: Do not read unless you are ready to be changed and want to change the world!” —O. Wesley Allen Jr., Lois Craddock Perkins Professor of Homiletics, Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX

Exilic Preaching

Testimony for Christian Exiles in an Increasingly Hostile Culture

Author: Erskine Clarke

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781563382468

Category: Religion

Page: 144

View: 3399

This powerful collection of articles and sermons focuses on the new location of the church in contemporary North American society, a location that may be described by the metaphor "exile." Walter Brueggemann, Stanley Hauerwas, Barbara Brown Taylor, and Will Willimon here address the growing uneasiness of today's Christians about sustaining old patterns of faith and life in a context where their most treasured symbols of faith are often mocked, trivialized, or dismissed.

No Longer Bound

A Theology of Reading and Preaching

Author: James Henry Harris

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1621896811

Category: Religion

Page: 254

View: 4665

No Longer Bound is about the intersection of reading comprehension and interpretation that leads to the development of a powerful and transformative sermon. Reading facilitates the interpretive process, which is the essence of any sermon. The sermon is an interpretation of an interpretation and as such presents itself as a new gospel message. The ability to write and preach a sermon is an exercise in freedom. The book is grounded in a narrative theological form that begins with the author's experience and filters that experience through the lens of hermeneutic philosophy and theology. Reading and preaching constitute the thread that runs throughout the book. The book suggests that the sermon is the philosophic theology of Black practical religion inasmuch as the Black church is central to religion and culture. This is a fresh and new understanding of homiletics, philosophical theology, and interpretation theory that is intended to produce better preachers and more powerful and life-changing sermons by all who endeavor to preach.

Anxious to Talk about It

Helping White Christians Talk Faithfully about Racism

Author: Carolyn B. Helsel

Publisher: Chalice Press

ISBN: 0827200730

Category: Religion

Page: 136

View: 8860

"Wait... We're talking about what? I'm not so sure I want to do that." When it comes to discussing racism, many white people are overwhelmed with anxiety, leading to a fight-or-flight response. In Anxious to Talk About It, pastor and professor Carolyn B. Helsel draws on her successful experiences with white congregations to offer us tools to embrace and explore these anxious feelings. Through the sharing of our stories, new insights on racial identity, and spiritual practices to help you engage racial justice concerns prayerfully, you'll begin to overcome your anxiety and learn to join conversations with less fear, more compassion, and more knowledge of self, others, and the important issues at stake. Helsel's words and guidance will inspire you to receive the gifts that come through these difficult conversations and point to how you can get further involved in the important work around race relations. While Anxious to Talk About It can be read alone, reading it with a group is strongly recommended to help deepen and broaden the discussion, integrate the material and practice with others. Free Study Guide available at www.chalicepress.com.

Thank God It’s Thursday

Encountering Jesus at the Lord's Table as if for the Last Time

Author: William H. Willimon

Publisher: Abingdon Press

ISBN: 1426743378

Category: Religion

Page: 110

View: 9770

Prepare for Easter and enter the holy mystery of Maundy Thursday with Jesus as host at the table."

Holding Up Your Corner

Talking about Race in Your Community

Author: F. Willis Johnson

Publisher: Abingdon Press

ISBN: 1501837605

Category: Religion

Page: N.A

View: 4010

Holding Up Your Corner: Talking About Race in Your Community, equips pastors to respond with confidence when crises occur, lower their own inhibitions about addressing this topic, and reclaim their authority as prophetic witnesses and leaders in order to transform their communities Pastors and other church leaders see, to varying degrees, racially rooted injustice in their communities. Most of them understand an imperative, as part of their calling from God, to lead their congregations to address and reverse this injustice. For instance, preachers want to be preaching prophetically on this topic. But the problems seem irreversible, intractable, overwhelming, and pastors often feel their individual efforts will be futile. Additionally, they realize that there is a lot of risk involved, including the possibility that their actions may offend and even push some members away from the church. They do not know what to do or how to begin. And so, even during times of crisis, pastors and other church leaders typically do less than they know they could and should. This book provides practical, foundational guidance, showing pastors how to live into their calling to address injustice, and how to lead others to do the same. Holding Up Your Corner prompts readers to observe, identify and name the complex causes of violence and hatred in the reader’s particular community, including racial prejudice, entrenched poverty and exploitation, segregation, the loss of local education and employment, the ravages of addiction, and so on. The book walks the church leader through a self-directed process of determining what role to play in the leader’s particular location. Readers will learn to use testimony and other narrative devices, proclamation, guided group conversations, and other tactics in order to achieve the following: Open eyes to the realities in the reader’s community—where God’s reign/kingdom is not yet overcoming selfishness, injustice, inequality, or the forces of evil. Own the calling and responsibility we have as Christians, and learn how to advocate hope for God’s kingdom in the reader’s community. Organize interventions and activate mission teams to address the specific injustices in the reader’s community. What Does ‘Holding Up Your Corner’ Mean? The phrase ‘holding up your corner’ is derived from a biblical story (Mark 2: 1 – 5) about four people who take action in order to help another person—literally delivering that person to Christ. For us, ‘holding up your corner’ has meaning in two aspects of our lives today: First, it refers to our physical and social locations, the places where we live and work, and the communities of which we’re a part. These are the places where our assumptions, attitudes, and beliefs have influence on the people around us. When we feel empowered to speak out about the injustice or inequity in our community, we are holding up our corner. Second, the phrase refers to our actions, the ways we step up to meet a particular problem of injustice or inequity, and proactively do something about it. When we put ourselves—literally—next to persons who are suffering, and enter into their situation in order to bring hope and healing to the person and the situation, we are holding up our corner, just like the four people who held up the corner of the hurting man’s mat.

I Heart Francis

Letters to the Pope from an Ulikely Admirer

Author: Donna Schaper

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN: 1506408621

Category: Religion

Page: 248

View: 2767

Everyone is paying attention to Pope Francis, and that includes the most unlikely of admirers: a female Baptist pastor. Veteran minister and social justice advocate Donna Schaper has become a fan of the pope, covering him for Religion Dispatches, traveling to see him speak, and taking up many of his issues. Schaper says that Francis is a pope for all of us, and she has written him a series of letters—love letters, of a sort. She agrees with him on the environment, climate change, love of animals, and concern for the poor. But she has a lovers’ quarrel with him on the issues of women’s ordination and GLBT rights. Schaper’s letters to Pope Francis are intimate and ornery, affirming and challenging. She has high hopes that he can heal the church and the globe, and she prods him to be even more inclusive than he already is. In the end, in spite of their disagreements, Pastor Donna loves Pope Francis, and she calls us all to join him in loving the world.

Choose Life

Christmas and Easter Sermons in Canterbury Cathedral

Author: Rowan Williams

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408190389

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 7885

The addresses that Rowan Williams has given in Canterbury Cathedral for Christmas and Easter are small masterpieces of this kind. They constitute part of Rowan Williams' essential legacy to Christian believers. With a new introduction by Dr Williams, this is the first time these pieces have appeared in print. Perfect reading material for Lent or Advent.

Preacher

David H. C. Read's Sermons at Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church

Author: David H. C. Read

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1532605749

Category: Religion

Page: 302

View: 5828

This book introduces David H. C. Read to a new generation, through sermons that are not merely elegantly worded and biblically grounded, but packed with life experience that included a five year stint as a prisoner of war during World War II. From amongst the almost 1500 sermons that Read preached during his ministry in Manhattan, John McTavish has selected forty enduring messages that show David Read, justifying Time magazine's assessment that "Read is not merely elegant and literary; his words carry authority… through his thought runs a strain of deep feeling and faith capable of convincing others."

How Odd of God

Chosen for the Curious Vocation of Preaching

Author: William H. Willimon

Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press

ISBN: 1611646251

Category: Religion

Page: 160

View: 1355

Election is a strange word when used in theology. It brings to mind old debates about what God might or might not have done before the foundation of the world. But viewed apart from that historical baggage, the word election is about a central gospel idea: that in Jesus not only does God choose to be God for us but chooses us to be for God. The calling of the disciples in the gospels is a story of election, of how God chooses to transform the world by choosing us to be messengers and agents of that transformation. So it is, says William Willimon, that election becomes not just the content of our preaching but the means as well. God chooses preachers. How unlikely—how odd—is it that God should entrust the proclamation of the gospel to, well, us? This unpredictable, electing God reaches out to save the world and then leaves it in the hands of preachers to get the word out? Through us, through our stammering tongues and faltering hearts, the preached word becomes the Word of God. If you wonder why you drag yourself into the pulpit every Sunday, if you worry that your sermons aren't reaching past the front pew, then read this book and be encouraged. God chooses; God chooses preachers; God chooses you.

The Best of Will Willimon

Acting Up in Jesus' Name

Author: William H. Willimon

Publisher: Abingdon Press

ISBN: 1426748515

Category: Religion

Page: 177

View: 2673

Take the best preacher you’ve ever heard; add in the teacher who first opened your eyes to the excitement and meaning of your favorite subject in school; combine these with that member of the family to whom you could always turn for the best advice; stir them all together, and you’ll get a flavor of the writing of Ellsworth Kalas. And now the very best thoughts and reflections of this wise teacher and guide are available together in one volume. Across his career Ellsworth Kalas has worn many hats: pastor, professor, seminary president. Through all of them, however, he has remained first and foremost an interpreter of God’s Word. His most potent skill is to open up new insights and meanings in even the most familiar biblical stories. Gathered here are some Kalas’s most humorous, touching, and enlightening writings, drawn from his own experience of finding God in Scripture.

Baptists, Jews, and the Holocaust

The Hand of Sincere Friendship

Author: Lee B. Spitzer

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780817017828

Category: History

Page: 482

View: 1578

Rich with primary resource material and covering the full history of all Baptists during this period, Baptists, Jews, and the Holocaust: The Hand of Sincere Friendship answers the unresolved question, "How did Baptists respond to the rise of the Nazis in Germany and their persecution of the Jewish people throughout Europe?" This ground-breaking volume is a must-read for church historians, Holocaust scholars, Baptist history buffs, and anyone interested in interfaith relations. Book jacket.

Apartheid's Reluctant Uncle

The United States and Southern Africa in the Early Cold War

Author: Thomas Borstelmann

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195079426

Category: History

Page: 298

View: 6633

Despite the unsavory racism of Malan's government - Borstelmann shows that Pretoria fomented violence among black groups in the late 1940s, just as it has done recently between the ANC and Inkatha - the U.S. saw South Africa as a dependable and important ally. In addition, America was almost completely dependent on southern Africa for its uranium supply, and was willing to go to great lengths to secure the critical fuel for its nuclear arsenal. Borstelmann also notes that race relations in the segregated U.S. played a role in Washington's policies, with few white Americans greatly disturbed by the establishment of apartheid. As South Africa finally nears an end to almost fifty years of formal apartheid (and as Truman nears canonization, following the recent presidential election), Borstelmann's account comes as a startling reminder of America's early links to Pretoria's racist system

New World A-Coming

Black Religion and Racial Identity during the Great Migration

Author: Judith Weisenfeld

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479812935

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 3992

When Joseph Nathaniel Beckles registered for the draft in the 1942, he rejected the racial categories presented to him and persuaded the registrar to cross out the check mark she had placed next to Negro and substitute “Ethiopian Hebrew.” “God did not make us Negroes,” declared religious leaders in black communities of the early twentieth-century urban North. They insisted that so-called Negroes are, in reality, Ethiopian Hebrews, Asiatic Muslims, or raceless children of God. Rejecting conventional American racial classification, many black southern migrants and immigrants from the Caribbean embraced these alternative visions of black history, racial identity, and collective future, thereby reshaping the black religious and racial landscape. Focusing on the Moorish Science Temple, the Nation of Islam, Father Divine’s Peace Mission Movement, and a number of congregations of Ethiopian Hebrews, Judith Weisenfeld argues that the appeal of these groups lay not only in the new religious opportunities membership provided, but also in the novel ways they formulated a religio-racial identity. Arguing that members of these groups understood their religious and racial identities as divinely-ordained and inseparable, the book examines how this sense of self shaped their conceptions of their bodies, families, religious and social communities, space and place, and political sensibilities. Weisenfeld draws on extensive archival research and incorporates a rich array of sources to highlight the experiences of average members. The book demonstrates that the efforts by members of these movements to contest conventional racial categorization contributed to broader discussions in black America about the nature of racial identity and the collective future of black people that still resonate today.

Fear of the Other Leader Guide

No Fear in Love

Author: William H. Willimon,Erin M. Hawkins

Publisher: Abingdon Press

ISBN: 1501857312

Category: Religion

Page: N.A

View: 8257

This five-week DVD/video based small group study (DVD and Leader Guide) companion to the book, Fear of the Other: No Fear in Love invites readers to consider the Gospel command to love (and not merely tolerate) those considered to be “Other” or outside mainstream Christian culture. Rooted in the faith of Israel and the Christian story and vision, Willimon – in an onscreen conversation with Delia Catalina Ramirez, brings a non-technical, Wesleyan perspective to bear on what may be the hardest thing for people of faith to do: keeping and loving the Other as Other. Emphasizing the biblical mandate to receive Others in their particularity and difference as gifts and mysteries bearing the grace of God, this study also offers a strong critique of the privileged who all too often rush to language of reconciliation and evade the huge inequalities surrounding conversations and practices dealing with xenophobia and injustice. Rooted in the New Testament understanding of Gentile outsiders grafted into the covenant community, this study invites readers to an on-the ground faith that hearkens to a soliciting and revealing God – the God who comes to us again and again through so-called outsiders, strangers, immigrants, and those without status. The 5 video conversations between Will Willimon and Delia Ramirez focus on each of the five chapters of Fear of the Other: Session 1: Saved by the Other Session 2: The Other, My Enemy Session 3: Learning to Fear Like Christians Session 4: Loving the Other in Church Session 5: Jesus, the Other

Ain't I a Woman

Black Women and Feminism

Author: bell hooks

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317588614

Category: Social Science

Page: 206

View: 8511

A classic work of feminist scholarship, Ain't I a Woman has become a must-read for all those interested in the nature of black womanhood. Examining the impact of sexism on black women during slavery, the devaluation of black womanhood, black male sexism, racism among feminists, and the black woman's involvement with feminism, hooks attempts to move us beyond racist and sexist assumptions. The result is nothing short of groundbreaking, giving this book a critical place on every feminist scholar's bookshelf.

Do No Harm

Social Sin and Christian Responsibility

Author: Stephen G. Ray

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN: 9780800634971

Category: Religion

Page: 164

View: 8080

Among the evils addressed by Christian theology, says Stephen Ray, must be the evil perpetuated by its own well-meant theologies. His important project examines the downside of the category of social sin, especially in theologians' use of destructive stereotypes that have kept Christians from realizing and engaging the most pervasive social evils of our time-racism and anti-Semitism. To make his case, Ray examines problematic ways in which several theologians describe the reality of social evil. "Theologians," he contends, "often unwittingly describe [social] sin in terms that may themselves be profoundly racist, sexist, heterosexist, anti-Semitic, and classist." He contends that they must attend more carefully to the social evils deeply embedded in their own patterns of language and thought. Ray looks specifically to the work of Reinhold Neibuhr and Dietrich Bonhoeffer to document unintended consequences of theology's oversights and then to Augustine, Luther, and Calvin to analyze the strains and strengths of traditional notions. Not only theologians and ethicists but also ministers and laity will benefit from Ray's thoughtful reconsideration of the social stance of Christian theology.