White Like Her

My Family’s Story of Race and Racial Passing

Author: Gail Lukasik

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Inc.

ISBN: 151072415X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 316

View: 1695

White Like Her: My Family’s Story of Race and Racial Passing is the story of Gail Lukasik’s mother’s “passing,” Gail’s struggle with the shame of her mother’s choice, and her subsequent journey of self-discovery and redemption. In the historical context of the Jim Crow South, Gail explores her mother’s decision to pass, how she hid her secret even from her own husband, and the price she paid for choosing whiteness. Haunted by her mother’s fear and shame, Gail embarks on a quest to uncover her mother’s racial lineage, tracing her family back to eighteenth-century colonial Louisiana. In coming to terms with her decision to publicly out her mother, Gail changed how she looks at race and heritage. With a foreword written by Kenyatta Berry, host of PBS's Genealogy Roadshow, this unique and fascinating story of coming to terms with oneself breaks down barriers.

White Like Her

My Familyas Story of Race and Racial Passing

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781510724129

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 7232


A Chosen Exile

A History of Racial Passing in American Life

Author: Allyson Hobbs

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674744810

Category: Social Science

Page: 394

View: 3055

Countless African Americans have passed as white, leaving behind families and friends, roots and communities. It was, as Allyson Hobbs writes, a chosen exile. This history of passing explores the possibilities, challenges, and losses that racial indeterminacy presented to men and women living in a country obsessed with racial distinctions.

Destroying Angels

A Leigh Girard Mystery

Author: Gail Lukasik

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 9781492936138

Category:

Page: 422

View: 7278

Determined to make a fresh start after beating cancer, Chicagoan Leigh Girard leaves a failed marriage and a teaching career and moves to Egg Harbor, Wisconsin. Her first assignment as a writer for the local newspaper is an obituary feature on Carl Peck, a carpenter who died suddenly while hospitalized. His widow is claiming medical negligence. But as Leigh looks into the story, she finds something far worse: possible murder. Leigh's suspicions are confirmed when it's discovered that Peck, an amateur naturalist, died from mushroom poisoning. The case turns even more puzzling when the Pecks' daughter attempts to take her own life shortly after her good friend, the local librarian, kills herself. In the process of solving Peck's murder, Leigh uncovers another murder committed twenty years earlier that links the past with the present. As she probes the heart of of a tragic mystery, Leigh learns the survival instincts that have carried her this far are about to be tested against a clever killer.

One Drop

My Father's Hidden Life--A Story of Race and Family Secrets

Author: Bliss Broyard

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 0316019739

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 528

View: 8810

Two months before he died of cancer, renowned literary critic Anatole Broyard called his grown son and daughter to his side, intending to reveal a secret he had kept all their lives and most of his own: he was black. But even as he lay dying, the truth was too difficult for him to share, and it was his wife who told Bliss that her WASPy, privileged Connecticut childhood had come at a price. Ever since his own parents, New Orleans Creoles, had moved to Brooklyn and began to "pass" in order to get work, Anatole had learned to conceal his racial identity. As he grew older and entered the ranks of the New York literary elite, he maintained the façade. Now his daughter Bliss tries to make sense of his choices and the impact of this revelation on her own life. She searches out the family she never knew in New York and New Orleans, and considers the profound consequences of racial identity. With unsparing candor and nuanced insight, Broyard chronicles her evolution from sheltered WASP to a woman of mixed race ancestry.

Secret Daughter

A Mixed-Race Daughter and the Mother Who Gave Her Away

Author: June Cross

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 110120169X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 9194

June Cross was born in 1954 to Norma Booth, a glamorous, aspiring white actress, and James “Stump” Cross, a well-known black comedian. Sent by her mother to be raised by black friends when she was four years old and could no longer pass as white, June was plunged into the pain and confusion of a family divided by race. Secret Daughter tells her story of survival. It traces June’s astonishing discoveries about her mother and about her own fierce determination to thrive. This is an inspiring testimony to the endurance of love between mother and daughter, a child and her adoptive parents, and the power of community.

Passing for White

Race, Religion, and the Healy Family, 1820-1920

Author: James M. O'Toole

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781558494176

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 2781

A fascinating account of a mixed-race family living in nineteenth-century America introduces readers to the complexities of life lived on the racial dividing line a century ago.

Near Black

White-to-Black Passing in American Culture

Author: Baz Dreisinger

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781558496750

Category: Social Science

Page: 184

View: 6666

'Near Black' offers a provocative look at the shifting contours of racial identity in America. The text explores the often ignored history of what she calls 'reverse racial passing' by looking at the broad spectrum of short stories, novels, films, autobiographies, and pop-culture discourse that depict whites passing for black.

White Like Me

Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son

Author: Tim Wise

Publisher: Soft Skull Press

ISBN: 1593764707

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 208

View: 7802

With a new preface and updated chapters, White Like Me is one-part memoir, one-part polemical essay collection. It is a personal examination of the way in which racial privilege shapes the daily lives of white Americans in every realm: employment, education, housing, criminal justice, and elsewhere. Using stories from his own life, Tim Wise demonstrates the ways in which racism not only burdens people of color, but also benefits, in relative terms, those who are “white like him.” He discusses how racial privilege can harm whites in the long run and make progressive social change less likely. He explores the ways in which whites can challenge their unjust privileges, and explains in clear and convincing language why it is in the best interest of whites themselves to do so. Using anecdotes instead of stale statistics, Wise weaves a narrative that is at once readable and yet scholarly, analytical and yet accessible.

We Wear the Mask

15 True Stories of Passing in America

Author: Brando Skyhorse,Lisa Frazier Page

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807078980

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 204

View: 785

"For some, "passing" means opportunity, access, or safety. Others don't willfully pass but are "passed" in specific situations by someone else. We Wear the Mask, edited by authors Brando Skyhorse and Lisa Page, is an illuminating and timely anthology of original essays that examines the complex reality of passing in America."--

Clearly Invisible

Racial Passing and the Color of Cultural Identity

Author: Marcia Alesan Dawkins

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781602583122

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 5671

Certain to be hailed as a pioneering work in the study of race and culture, Clearly Invisible offers powerful testimony to the fact that individual identities are never fully self-determined--and that race is far more a matter of sociology than of biology.--Margaret Hunter, author of Race, Gender, and the Politics of Skin Tone "The Christian Century"

The Invisible Line

A Secret History of Race in America

Author: Daniel J. Sharfstein

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101475803

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 6753

"The Invisible Line" shines light on one of the most important, but too often hidden, aspects of American history and culture. Sharfstein's narrative of three families negotiating America's punishing racial terrain is a must read for all who are interested in the construction of race in the United States." --Annette Gordon-Reed, Pulitzer Prize winning author of The Hemingses of Monticello In America, race is a riddle. The stories we tell about our past have calcified into the fiction that we are neatly divided into black or white. It is only with the widespread availability of DNA testing and the boom in genealogical research that the frequency with which individuals and entire families crossed the color line has become clear. In this sweeping history, Daniel J. Sharfstein unravels the stories of three families who represent the complexity of race in America and force us to rethink our basic assumptions about who we are. The Gibsons were wealthy landowners in the South Carolina backcountry who became white in the 1760s, ascending to the heights of the Southern elite and ultimately to the U.S. Senate. The Spencers were hardscrabble farmers in the hills of Eastern Kentucky, joining an isolated Appalachian community in the 1840s and for the better part of a century hovering on the line between white and black. The Walls were fixtures of the rising black middle class in post-Civil War Washington, D.C., only to give up everything they had fought for to become white at the dawn of the twentieth century. Together, their interwoven and intersecting stories uncover a forgotten America in which the rules of race were something to be believed but not necessarily obeyed. Defining their identities first as people of color and later as whites, these families provide a lens for understanding how people thought about and experienced race and how these ideas and experiences evolved-how the very meaning of black and white changed-over time. Cutting through centuries of myth, amnesia, and poisonous racial politics, The Invisible Line will change the way we talk about race, racism, and civil rights.

Life on the Color Line

The True Story of a White Boy Who Discovered He Was Black

Author: Gregory Howard Williams

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781440673337

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 1690

Winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize “A triumph of storytelling as well as a triumph of spirit.”—Alex Kotlowitz, award-winning author of There Are No Children Here As a child in 1950s segregated Virginia, Gregory Howard Williams grew up believing he was white. But when the family business failed and his parents’ marriage fell apart, Williams discovered that his dark-skinned father, who had been passing as Italian-American, was half black. The family split up, and Greg, his younger brother, and their father moved to Muncie, Indiana, where the young boys learned the truth about their heritage. Overnight, Greg Williams became black. In this extraordinary and powerful memoir, Williams recounts his remarkable journey along the color line and illuminates the contrasts between the black and white worlds: one of privilege, opportunity and comfort, the other of deprivation, repression, and struggle. He tells of the hostility and prejudice he encountered all too often, from both blacks and whites, and the surprising moments of encouragement and acceptance he found from each. Life on the Color Line is a uniquely important book. It is a wonderfully inspiring testament of purpose, perseverance, and human triumph. “Heartbreaking and uplifting… a searing book about race and prejudice in America… brims with insights that only someone who has lived on both sides of the racial divide could gain.”—Cleveland Plain Dealer From the Trade Paperback edition.

American Routes

Louisiana's Past As Prologue to America's Present

Author: Angel Adams Parham

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190624752

Category:

Page: 296

View: 1355

American Routes provides a comparative and historical analysis of the migration and integration of white and free black refugees from nineteenth century St. Domingue/Haiti to Louisiana and follows the progress of their descendants over the course of two hundred years. The refugees reinforced Louisiana's tri-racial system and pushed back the progress of Anglo-American racialization by several decades. But over the course of the nineteenth century, the ascendance of the Anglo-American racial system began to eclipse Louisiana's tri-racial Latin/Caribbean system. The result was a racial palimpsest that transformed everyday life in southern Louisiana. White refugees and their descendants in Creole Louisiana succumbed to pressure to adopt a strict definition of whiteness as purity that conformed to standards of the Anglo-American racial system. Those of color, however, held on to the logic of the tri-racial system which allowed them to inhabit an intermediary racial group that provided a buffer against the worst effects of Jim Crow segregation. The St. Domingue/Haiti migration case foreshadows the experiences of present-day immigrants of color from Latin-America and the Caribbean, many of whom chafe against the strictures of the binary U.S. racial system and resist by refusing to be categorized as either black or white. The St. Domingue/Haiti case study is the first of its kind to compare the long-term integration experiences of white and free black nineteenth century immigrants to the U.S. In this sense, it fills a significant gap in studies of race and migration which have long relied on the historical experience of European immigrants as the standard to which all other immigrants are compared.

A White Side of Black Britain

Interracial Intimacy and Racial Literacy

Author: France Winddance Twine

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822348764

Category: Social Science

Page: 305

View: 8532

A White Side of Black Britain explores the racial consciousness of white women in the United Kingdom who have had children with black men, primarily British-born men of Caribbean heritage. Contending that social scientists do not adequately understand how white members of black families negotiate race, France Winddance Twine describes the everyday lives of white women raising children of African Caribbean descent in a racially diverse mid-size British city. Varying in age, income, and education, the women at the centre of Twine's ethnography share moving stories about how they met the fathers of their children, how they incorporate ideas about race and racism into their parenting, and how their thinking about race and social relations changed over time. Interviewing and observing more than forty multiracial families over the span of a decade, Twine discovered that the white women's sense of belonging and racial consciousness was derived as much from their interactions with their partner's family and friends as it was from their romantic relations with black men. In addition to the white birth mothers, Twine interviewed their children, partners, and extended families, and her book can be read in part as a dialogue about race among black and white members of the same families. It includes intimate photographs of the women and their children, partners, extended families, and community.

In Full Color

Finding My Place in a Black and White World

Author: Rachel Dolezal,Storms Reback

Publisher: BenBella Books, Inc.

ISBN: 1944648178

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 1983

A lot of people have made up their minds about Rachel Doležal. But none of them know her real story. In June 2015, the media “outed” Rachel Doležal as a white woman who had knowingly been “passing” as Black. When asked if she were African American during an interview about the hate crimes directed at her and her family, she hesitated before ending the interview and walking away. Some interpreted her reluctance to respond and hasty departure as dishonesty, while others assumed she lacked a reasonable explanation for the almost unprecedented way she identified herself. What determines your race? Is it your DNA? The community in which you were raised? The way others see you or the way you see yourself? With In Full Color, Rachel Doležal describes the path that led her from being a child of white evangelical parents to an NAACP chapter president and respected educator and activist who identifies as Black. Along the way, she recounts the deep emotional bond she formed with her four adopted Black siblings, the sense of belonging she felt while living in Black communities in Jackson, Mississippi, and Washington, DC, and the experiences that have shaped her along the way. Her story is nuanced and complex, and in the process of telling it, she forces us to consider race in an entirely new light—not as a biological imperative, but as a function of the experiences we have, the culture we embrace, and, ultimately, the identity we choose.

Futureface

A Family Mystery, an Epic Quest, and the Secret to Belonging

Author: Alex Wagner

Publisher: One World

ISBN: 0812997956

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 8148

An acclaimed journalist travels the globe to solve the mystery of her ancestry, confronting the question at the heart of the American experience of immigration, race, and identity: Who are my people? “A thoughtful, beautiful meditation on what makes us who we are . . . and the values and ideals that bind us together as Americans.”—Barack Obama “A rich and revealing memoir . . . Futureface raises urgent questions having to do with history and complicity.”—The New York Times Alex Wagner has always been fascinated by stories of exile and migration. Her father’s ancestors immigrated to the United States from Ireland and Luxembourg. Her mother fled Rangoon in the 1960s, escaping Burma’s military dictatorship. In her professional life, Wagner reported from the Arizona-Mexico border, where agents, drones, cameras, and military hardware guarded the line between two nations. She listened to debates about whether the United States should be a melting pot or a salad bowl. She knew that moving from one land to another—and the accompanying recombination of individual and tribal identities—was the story of America. And she was happy that her own mixed-race ancestry and late twentieth-century education had taught her that identity is mutable and meaningless, a thing we make rather than a thing we are. When a cousin’s offhand comment threw a mystery into her personal story–introducing the possibility of an exciting new twist in her already complex family history—Wagner was suddenly awakened to her own deep hunger to be something, to belong, to have an identity that mattered, a tribe of her own. Intoxicated by the possibility, she became determined to investigate her genealogy. So she set off on a quest to find the truth about her family history. The journey takes Wagner from Burma to Luxembourg, from ruined colonial capitals with records written on banana leaves to Mormon databases and high-tech genetic labs. As she gets closer to solving the mystery of her own ancestry, she begins to grapple with a deeper question: Does it matter? Is our enduring obsession with blood and land, race and identity, worth all the trouble it’s caused us? The answers can be found in this deeply personal account of her search for belonging, a meditation on the things that define us as insiders and outsiders and make us think in terms of “us” and “them.” In this time of conflict over who we are as a country, when so much emphasis is placed on ethnic, religious, and national divisions, Futureface constructs a narrative where we all belong.

Brit(ish)

On Race, Identity and Belonging

Author: Afua Hirsch

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1473546893

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 5431

The Sunday Times bestseller that reveals the uncomfortable truth about race and identity in Britain today You’re British. Your parents are British. Your partner, your children and most of your friends are British. So why do people keep asking where you’re from? We are a nation in denial about our imperial past and the racism that plagues our present. Brit(ish) is Afua Hirsch’s personal and provocative exploration of how this came to be – and an urgent call for change. ‘The book for our divided and dangerous times’ David Olusoga

Black Like Me

Author: John Howard Griffin,Robert Bonazzi

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0451234219

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 200

View: 5915

A white writer recounts his experiences in the American South following treatments that darkened his skin and shares his thoughts on the problems of prejudice and racial injustice.