When Memory Fails

Helping the Alzheimer's and Dementia Patient

Author: Allen Jack Edwards

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Medical

Page: 282

View: 2490

Introduces dementia, discusses its causes and effects, diagnosis, and the progress of the condition, and provides advice for caregivers

When Memory Fails

Author: D. W. Marchwell

Publisher: Dreamspinner Press

ISBN: 1613721382

Category: Fiction

Page: 200

View: 2930

"Sequel to Falling" It's been two years since Hank Ballam and Scott Alan fell in love, moved in together, and started building their life. Hank has kept his promise to his boss-and Scott's brother-Brian, proving he can be both his adrenaline-seeking self and a good worker. While Hank enjoys being Brian's right-hand man, nothing gives him more pleasure than going home to Scott every night. But then a major announcement gets Hank thinking about the family he left behind, and he wonders if there is any hope of including them in his new life with Scott. Seeing Hank's turmoil, Scott quietly reaches out to his lover's family-without telling Hank. Scott is overjoyed when Hank's sister seems receptive, but the reunion doesn't go as planned, leaving Scott to wonder if he's unleashed a series of events that might take Hank from him forever.

Carved in Sand

When Memory Fades in Mid-Life

Author: Cathryn Jakobson Ramin

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9780061873546

Category: Psychology

Page: 336

View: 6654

Why can't you remember where you put your keys? Or the title of the movie you saw last week? Anyone older than forty knows that forgetfulness can be unnerving, frustrating, and sometimes terrifying. With compassion and humor, acclaimed journalist Cathryn Jakobson Ramin explores the factors that determine how well or poorly one's brain will age. She takes readers along on her lively journey—consulting with experts in the fields of sleep, stress, traumatic brain injury, hormones, genetics, and dementia, as well as specialists in nutrition, cognitive psychology, and the burgeoning field of drug-based cognitive enhancement. Along the way, she turns up fresh scientific findings, explores the dark regions of the human brain, and hears the intimate confessions of high-functioning midlife adults who—like so many of us—are desperate to understand exactly what's going on upstairs.

The Seven Sins of Memory

How the Mind Forgets and Remembers

Author: Daniel L. Schacter

Publisher: HMH

ISBN: 9780547347455

Category: Psychology

Page: 288

View: 7422

A New York Times Notable Book: A psychologist’s “gripping and thought-provoking” look at how and why our brains sometimes fail us (Steven Pinker, author of How the Mind Works). In this intriguing study, Harvard psychologist Daniel L. Schacter explores the memory miscues that occur in everyday life, placing them into seven categories: absent-mindedness, transience, blocking, misattribution, suggestibility, bias, and persistence. Illustrating these concepts with vivid examples—case studies, literary excerpts, experimental evidence, and accounts of highly visible news events such as the O. J. Simpson verdict, Bill Clinton’s grand jury testimony, and the search for the Oklahoma City bomber—he also delves into striking new scientific research, giving us a glimpse of the fascinating neurology of memory and offering “insight into common malfunctions of the mind” (USA Today). “Though memory failure can amount to little more than a mild annoyance, the consequences of misattribution in eyewitness testimony can be devastating, as can the consequences of suggestibility among pre-school children and among adults with ‘false memory syndrome’ . . . Drawing upon recent neuroimaging research that allows a glimpse of the brain as it learns and remembers, Schacter guides his readers on a fascinating journey of the human mind.” —Library Journal “Clear, entertaining and provocative . . . Encourages a new appreciation of the complexity and fragility of memory.” —The Seattle Times “Should be required reading for police, lawyers, psychologists, and anyone else who wants to understand how memory can go terribly wrong.” —The Atlanta Journal-Constitution “A fascinating journey through paths of memory, its open avenues and blind alleys . . . Lucid, engaging, and enjoyable.” —Jerome Groopman, MD “Compelling in its science and its probing examination of everyday life, The Seven Sins of Memory is also a delightful book, lively and clear.” —Chicago Tribune Winner of the William James Book Award

Human Memory

Theory and Practice

Author: Alan D. Baddeley

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780863774317

Category: Psychology

Page: 423

View: 7110

The models of how human memory works and developments in our understanding of the subject are explained and examined in this textbook for students and professionals. The author has tried to keep the style accessible for the general reader too

Focus on Alzheimer's Disease Research

Author: Eileen M. Welsh

Publisher: Nova Publishers

ISBN: 9781590337882

Category: Medical

Page: 326

View: 9414

Dementia is a brain disorder that seriously affects a person's ability to carry out daily activities. The most common form of dementia among older people is Alzheimer's disease (AD), which involves the parts of the brain that control thought, memory, and language. Age is the most important known risk factor for AD. The number of people with the disease doubles every 5 years beyond age 65. AD is a slow disease, starting with mild memory problems and ending with severe brain damage. The course the disease takes and how fast changes occur vary from person to person. On average, AD patients live from 8 to 10 years after they are diagnosed, though the disease can last for as many as 20 years. Current research is aimed at understanding why AD occurs and who is at greatest risk of developing it, improving the accuracy of diagnosis and the ability to identify those at risk, discovering, developing, and testing new treatments, and discovering treatments for behavioural problems in patients with AD. This new book gathers state-of-the-art research from leading scientists throughout the world which offers important information on understanding the underlying causes and discovering the most effective treatments for Alzheimer's Disease.

Psychology

PsychSim

Author: Thomas E. Ludwig

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780716759577

Category: Medical

Page: 68

View: 9400

These original interactive activities involve students in the practice of psychological research by having them play the role of an experimenter (conditioning a rat, probing the hypothalamus electrically, working in a sleep lab) or of a subject (responding to visual illusions or tests of memory, interpreting facial expressions).

The Cognitive Neuropsychology of False Memories

Author: Daniel L. Schacter

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780863776939

Category: Psychology

Page: 320

View: 3081

People sometimes remember events that never happened. These illusory or false memories have important practical implications in various aspects of everyday life, and also have significant theoretical implications for cognitive and neuropsychological models of memory. Cognitive psychologists and neuropsychologists have long been aware of false recognition, confabulation, and related kinds of memory distortions, but during the past several years research on these topics has increased rapidly. In recognition of this emerging domain of interest, this special issue of Cognitive Neuropsychology is devoted to the cognitive neuropsychology of false memories. Edited by Daniel L. Schacter, the special issue features experimental and theoretical contributions from leading cognitive psychologists, neuropsychologists, and neurologists that explore such issues as false recognition after frontal lobe damage, the nature of confabulation, amnesia and false memories, physiological correlates of memory illusions, memory distortions in normal and abnormal aging, and computational models of true and false memories.

When Memory Dies

Author: A. Sivanandan

Publisher: Arcadia Books

ISBN: 9781905147595

Category: Fiction

Page: 411

View: 1931

This novel is a powerful three-generational saga of a Sri Lankan family's search for coherence and continuity in a country broken by colonial occupation and riven by ethnic wars. The character Saha looks for order in a return to traditional values; Rajan is on a quest for modernity that takes him to the mother country; and Vijay is in a fight for socialism that ends in terror. Through the travail of their lives emerges the possibility of another future.

Searching For Memory

The Brain, The Mind, And The Past

Author: Daniel L. Schacter

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0786724293

Category: Psychology

Page: 352

View: 3736

Memory. There may be nothing more important to human beings than our ability to enshrine experience and recall it. While philosophers and poets have elevated memory to an almost mystical level, psychologists have struggled to demystify it. Now, according to Daniel Schacter, one of the most distinguished memory researchers, the mysteries of memory are finally yielding to dramatic, even revolutionary, scientific breakthroughs. Schacter explains how and why it may change our understanding of everything from false memory to Alzheimer's disease, from recovered memory to amnesia with fascinating firsthand accounts of patients with striking—and sometimes bizarre—amnesias resulting from brain injury or psychological trauma.

Cognition

From Memory to Creativity

Author: Robert W. Weisberg,Lauretta M. Reeves

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118233603

Category: Psychology

Page: 744

View: 7800

From memory to creativity—a complete and current presentation of the field of cognition The process of cognition allows us to function in life; it translates inputs from the world so we can recognize the sound of the alarm clock, remember the day of the week, and decide which clothes to wear. Cognition: From Memory to Creativity provides readers with a clear, research-based, and well-illustrated presentation of the field, starting with memory—the most accessible starting point—to more complex functions and research in information processing. Authors Robert Weisberg and Lauretta Reeves include the newest neurological findings that help us understand the human processes that allow for cognition. Unique in its organization, Cognition incorporates both classical and modern research and provides demonstration experiments for students to conduct with simple materials. Cognition explores: Models of memory and memory systems Encoding and retrieval Forgetting vs. false memory Visual cognition Attention and imagery Sounds, words, and meaning Logical thinking and decision making Problem solving and creative thinking

Animal Cognition

A Tribute To Donald A. Riley

Author: Thomas R. Zentall

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 1317782119

Category: Psychology

Page: 384

View: 505

Prepared as a tribute to Donald A. Riley, the essays that appear here are representative of a research area that has loosely been classified as animal cognition -- a categorization that reflects a functionalist philosophy that was prevalent in Riley's laboratory and that many of his students absorbed. According to this philosophy, it is acceptable to hypothesize that an animal might engage in complex processing of information, as long as one can operationalize evidence for such a process and the hypothesis can be presented in the context of testable predictions that can differentiate it from other mechanisms. The contributions to this volume represent the three most important areas of research in animal cognition -- stimulus representation, memory processes, and perceptual processes -- although current research has considerably blurred these distinctions.

Keeping Love Alive as Memories Fade

The 5 Love Languages and the Alzheimer's Journey

Author: Gary D. Chapman,Edward G. Shaw,Debbie Barr

Publisher: Moody Publishers

ISBN: 0802494412

Category: Religion

Page: 240

View: 517

Across America and around the world, the five love languages have revitalized relationships and saved marriages from the brink of disaster. Can they also help individuals, couples, and families cope with the devastating diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD)? Coauthors Chapman, Shaw, and Barr give a resounding yes. Their innovative application of the five love languages creates an entirely new way to touch the lives of the five million Americans who have Alzheimer’s, as well as their fifteen million caregivers. At its heart, this book is about how love gently lifts a corner of dementia’s dark curtain to cultivate an emotional connection amid memory loss. This collaborative, groundbreaking work between a healthcare professional, caregiver, and relationship expert will: Provide an overview of the love languages and Alzheimer’s disease, correlate the love languages with the developments of the stages of AD, discuss how both the caregiver and care receiver can apply the love languages, address the challenges and stresses of the caregiver journey, offer personal stories and case studies about maintaining emotional intimacy amidst AD. Keeping Love Alive as Memories Fade is heartfelt and easy to apply, providing gentle, focused help for those feeling overwhelmed by the relational toll of Alzheimer’s. Its principles have already helped hundreds of families, and it can help yours, too.

The Forgetting

Alzheimer's: Portrait of an Epidemic

Author: David Shenk

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 1400075580

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 304

View: 4955

NATIONAL BESTSELLER A powerfully engaging, scrupulously researched, and deeply empathetic narrative of the history of Alzheimer’s disease, how it affects us, and the search for a cure. Afflicting nearly half of all people over the age of 85, Alzheimer’s disease kills nearly 100,000 Americans a year as it insidiously robs them of their memory and wreaks havoc on the lives of their loved ones. It was once minimized and misunderstood as forgetfulness in the elderly, but Alzheimer’s is now at the forefront of many medical and scientific agendas, for as the world’s population ages, the disease will touch the lives of virtually everyone. David Shenk movingly captures the disease’s impact on its victims and their families, and he looks back through history, explaining how Alzheimer’s most likely afflicted such figures as Jonathan Swift, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Willem de Kooning. The result is a searing and graceful account of Alzheimer’s disease, offering a sobering, compassionate, and ultimately encouraging portrait.

Memory

Author: Patricia Fara,Karalyn Patterson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521572101

Category: Psychology

Page: 201

View: 8572

This engaging volume for the general reader explores how individuals and societies remember, forget and commemorate events of the past. The collection of eight essays takes an interdisciplinary approach to address the relationships between individual experience and collective memory, with leading experts from the arts and sciences. We might expect scientists to be concerned with studying just the mental and physical processes involved in remembering, and humanities scholars to be interested in the products of memory, such as books, statues and music. This collection exposes the falseness of such a dichotomy, illustrating the insights into memory which can be gained by juxtaposing the complementary perspectives of specialists venturing beyond the normal boundaries of their disciplines. The authors come from backgrounds as diverse as psychoanalysis, creative writing, neuroscience, social history and medicine.

Thoughts on Thought

Author: Earl Hunt

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 1135633592

Category: Psychology

Page: 174

View: 9075

This is an introduction to cognitive science intended for use as a textbook for advanced undergraduate and/or graduate-level courses. In it, the author presents the major experiments and theoretical arguments in cognitive psychology in some detail. Where appropriate, alternative theoretical arguments are offered, and in some cases the author explains that there are interesting questions to which psychologists do not yet have the answers. This book is packaged in an innovative manner. The 170-page printed textbook is actually a précis of a much longer manuscript, which is produced in the form of a CD-ROM bound into the back of the book. Each chapter of the précis references the more detailed coverage and full-color illustrations which are contained on the CD-ROM, which is provided for readers who wish to delve more deeply into the material.

Words and Rules

The Ingredients Of Language

Author: Steven Pinker

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465049710

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 384

View: 4801

"If you are not already a Steven Pinker addict, this book will make you one." --Jared Diamond In Words and Rules, Steven Pinker explores profound mysteries of language by picking a deceptively simple phenomenon--regular and irregular verbs--and examining it from every angle. With humor and verve, he covers an astonishing array of topics in the sciences and humanities, from the history of languages to how to simulate languages on computers to major ideas in the history of Western philosophy. Through it all, Pinker presents a single, powerful idea: that language comprises a mental dictionary of memorized words and a mental grammar of creative rules. The idea extends beyond language and offers insight into the very nature of the human mind. This is a sparkling, eye-opening, and utterly original book by one of the world's leading cognitive scientists.

God's Brain

Author: Lionel Tiger,Michael McGuire

Publisher: Prometheus Books

ISBN: 1616143118

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 526

The joint effort [of two distinguished authors and scholars] is impressive. It manages to bring the experience and energy of both men together in one, pithy, provocative package.-Washington TimesWith economy, evidence and no little wit and elegance, Lionel Tiger and Michael McGuire look for the answer to religion''s ubiquity and persistence in the only place possible: the human brain. To say more would be to give away their answer, and that would spoil a great read and a serious and informative argument. This is easily the best book on the nature of religion to appear for a long time.-Robin Fox, University Professor of Social Theory, Rutgers UniversityIf God''s Brain sounds whimsically paradoxical, it is only because the authors believe that most people of faith have been looking for God in all the wrong places. The authors suggest that religious believers should look inward, rather than outward, to find God. The book is a well-written, easy to read, unique perspective on religion. Yes, God has a brain. The book will captivate all but the piously religious faint-of-heart.-Jay R. Feierman, Editor, The Biology of Religious Behavior: The Evolutionary Origins of Faith and ReligionTwo distinguished authors radically alter the fractious debate on the existence of God and the nature of religion. Taking a perspective rooted in evolutionary biology with a focus on brain science, renowned anthropologist Lionel Tiger and pioneering neuroscientist Michael McGuire-a primary discoverer of serotonin''s crucial role in brain chemistry-elucidate the perennial questions about religion: What is its purpose? How did it arise? What is its source? Why does every known culture have some form of it?Their answer is deceptively simple, yet at the same time highly complex: The brain creates religion and its varied concepts of God, and then in turn feeds on its creation to satisfy innate neurological and associated social needs.Brain science reveals that humans and other primates alike are afflicted by unavoidable sources of stress that the authors describe as brainpain. To cope with this affliction people seek to brainsoothe. We humans use religion and its social structures to induce brainsoothing as a relief for innate anxiety. How we do this is the subject of this groundbreaking book.In a concise, lively, accessible, and witty style, the authors combine zoom-lens vignettes of religious practices with discussions of the latest research on religion''s neurological effects on the brain. Among other topics, they consider religion''s role in providing positive socialization, its seeming obsession with regulating sex, creating an afterlife, how religion''s rules of behavior influence the law, the common biological scaffolding between nonhuman primates and humans and how this affects religion, a detailed look at brain chemistry and how it changes as a result of stress, and evidence that the palliative effects of religion on brain chemistry is not matched by nonreligious remedies.Concluding with a checklist offering readers a means to compute their own brainsoothe score, this fascinating book provides key insights into the complexities of our brain and the role of religion, perhaps its most remarkable creation.Lionel Tiger (New York, NY) is the bestselling author of Men in Groups, The Imperial Animal (with Robin Fox), The Pursuit of Pleasure, Optimism: The Biology of Hope, and The Decline of Males. His articles have appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Rolling Stone, Harvard Business Review, and Brain and Behavioral Science. He is the Charles Darwin Professor of Anthropology at Rutgers University.Michael McGuire, MD (Cottonwood, CA), is the author or editor of ten books, including Darwinian Psychiatry (with A. Troisi). He is the president of the Biomedical Research Foundation, director of the Bradshaw Foundation and the Gruter Institute of Law and Behavior, and a trustee of the International Society of Human Ethology. Formerly, he was a professo