Weathering: An Introduction to the Scientific Principles

Author: Will J Bland,David Rolls

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317836308

Category: Science

Page: 271

View: 7345

Our landscape is constantly changing, but before the dramatic effects of erosion and mass movement take place, more subtle forces work on the rocks, minerals and soils around us. Weathering is the initial process which exposes the top few layers of the Earth to the potential for change. This book provides an introduction to the scientific principles behind mechanical, chemical and biological weathering. Starting with a consideration of the chemical and physical properties of rocks and water, the authors proceed to an accessible explanation of the weathering processes themselves, concluding with a review of weathering rates and intensities, and a survey of the effects of weathering on the landscape. Assuming little background knowledge, the authors develop ideas from first principles to provide a straightforward introduction to weathering for students of geography, geology and earth and environmental science.

Landforms of the World with Google Earth

Understanding our Environment

Author: Anja M. Scheffers,Simon M. May,Dieter H. Kelletat

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9401797137

Category: Science

Page: 391

View: 1510

This book of phenomenal illustrations provides a wealth of visual information on the wide variety of landform processes over all latitudes, climates and geological time-scales. It invites you to observe the surface of planet Earth, to appreciate its astonishing beauty and to explore scientific explanations for the form of our landscapes. 250 full-colour images from Google Earth enable all types of terrestrial environments and landforms to be appreciated at a glance. Images are explained with scales, coordinates, explanatory text and references, making the landform processes active on our globe easy for the reader to comprehend. See the effects of both sudden and slow forming agents such as the impact of a comet or meteorite, and erosion and deposition processes through wind, flowing water, creeping glacier ice, or frost in the ground. Appreciate how landscapes are shaped by processes such as weathering, transport and erosion and how that erosion enables us to look into endogenic processes (those within the Earth ́s crust), called tectonics. These images and the processes that they document show that continents are shifting, mountains are uplifting, and ocean bottoms may sink deeper. This collection will appeal to everyone: researchers, students and non-experts alike can take inspiration from these images, which bring the landforms of the world to life. The scientific discipline of geomorphology becomes accessible through the fascinating insights that these clear, well explained images allow.

Principles of Environmental Physics

Plants, Animals, and the Atmosphere

Author: John Monteith,Mike Unsworth

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN: 0123869935

Category: Science

Page: 422

View: 4054

Principles of Environmental Physics: Plants, Animals, and the Atmosphere, 4e, provides a basis for understanding the complex physical interactions of plants and animals with their natural environment. It is the essential reference to provide environmental and ecological scientists and researchers with the physical principles, analytic tools, and data analysis methods they need to solve problems. This book describes the principles by which radiative energy reaches the earth’s surface and reviews the latest knowledge concerning the surface radiation budget. The processes of radiation, convection, conduction, evaporation, and carbon dioxide exchange are analyzed. Many applications of environmental physics principles are reviewed, including the roles of surface albedo and atmospheric aerosols in modifying microclimate and climate, remote sensing of vegetation properties, wind forces on trees and crops, dispersion of pathogens and aerosols, controls of evaporation from vegetation and soil (including implications of changing weather and climate), and interpretation of micrometeorological measurements of carbon dioxide and other trace gas fluxes. Presents a unique synthesis of micrometeorology and ecology in its widest sense Deals quantitatively with the impact of weather on living systems but also with the interactions between organisms and the atmosphere that are a central feature of life on earth Offers numerous worked examples and problems with solutions Provides many examples of laboratory and field measurements and their interpretation Includes an up-to-date bibliography and review of recent micrometeorological applications in forestry, ecology, hydrology, and agriculture

A Framework for K-12 Science Education

Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas

Author: Committee on Conceptual Framework for the New K-12 Science Education Standards,Board on Science Education,Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education,National Research Council

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 0309214424

Category: Education

Page: 383

View: 473

Science, engineering, and technology permeate nearly every facet of modern life and hold the key to solving many of humanity's most pressing current and future challenges. The United States' position in the global economy is declining, in part because U.S. workers lack fundamental knowledge in these fields. To address the critical issues of U.S. competitiveness and to better prepare the workforce, A Framework for K-12 Science Education proposes a new approach to K-12 science education that will capture students' interest and provide them with the necessary foundational knowledge in the field. A Framework for K-12 Science Education outlines a broad set of expectations for students in science and engineering in grades K-12. These expectations will inform the development of new standards for K-12 science education and, subsequently, revisions to curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development for educators. This book identifies three dimensions that convey the core ideas and practices around which science and engineering education in these grades should be built. These three dimensions are: crosscutting concepts that unify the study of science through their common application across science and engineering; scientific and engineering practices; and disciplinary core ideas in the physical sciences, life sciences, and earth and space sciences and for engineering, technology, and the applications of science. The overarching goal is for all high school graduates to have sufficient knowledge of science and engineering to engage in public discussions on science-related issues, be careful consumers of scientific and technical information, and enter the careers of their choice. A Framework for K-12 Science Education is the first step in a process that can inform state-level decisions and achieve a research-grounded basis for improving science instruction and learning across the country. The book will guide standards developers, teachers, curriculum designers, assessment developers, state and district science administrators, and educators who teach science in informal environments.

El desarrollo sostenible, una guía sobre nuestro futuro común

El informe de la Comisión Mundial sobre el Medio Ambiente y el Desarrollo

Author: World Commission on Environment and Development

Publisher: IICA Biblioteca Venezuela

ISBN: 9780192820808

Category: Nature

Page: 383

View: 8091

Discusses population growth, food production, energy, industry, and urban development, and suggests ways to promote economic growth while protecting the environment.

Fundamentals of Fluvial Geomorphology

Author: Ro Charlton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134313497

Category: Science

Page: 280

View: 2625

Rivers are significant geomorphological agents, they show an amazing diversity of form and behaviour and transfer water and sediment from the land surface to the oceans. This book examines how river systems respond to environmental change and why this understanding is needed for successful river management. Highly dynamic in nature, river channels adjust and evolve over timescales that range from hours to tens of thousands of years or more, and are found in a wide range of environments. This book provides a comprehensive overview of recent developments in river channel management, clearly illustrating why an understanding of fluvial geomorphology is vital in channel preservation, environmentally sensitive design and the restoration of degraded river channels. It covers: flow and sediment regimes: flow generation; flow regimes; sediment sources, transfer and yield channel processes: flow characteristics; processes of erosion and sediment transport; interactions between flow and the channel boundary; deposition channel form and behaviour: controls on channel form; channel adjustments; floodplain development; form and behaviour of alluvial and bedrock channels response to change: how channels have responded to past environmental change; impacts of human activity; reconstructing past changes river management: the fluvial hydrosystem; environmental degradation; environmentally sensitive engineering techniques; river restoration; the role of the fluvial geomorphologist. Fundamentals of Fluvial Geomorphology is an indispensable text for undergraduate students. It provides straightforward explanations for important concepts and mathematical formulae, backed up with conceptual diagrams and appropriate examples from around the world to show what they actually mean and why they are important. A colour plate section also shows spectacular examples of fluvial diversity.

Sacred Worlds

An Introduction to Geography and Religion

Author: Chris Park

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113487734X

Category: Science

Page: 352

View: 3766

This book, the first in the field for two decades, looks at the relationships between geography and religion. It represents a synthesis of research by geographers of many countries, mainly since the 1960s. No previous book has tackled this emerging field from such a broad, interdisciplinary perspective, and never before have such a variety of detailed case studies been pulled together in so comparative or illuminating a way. Examples and case studies have been drawn from all the major world religions and from all continents from both a historical and contemporary perspective. Major themes covered in the book include the distribution of religion and the processes by which religion and religious ideas spread through space and time. Some of the important links between religion and population are also explored. A great deal of attention is focused on the visible manifestations of religion on the cultural landscape, including landscapes of worship and of death, and the whole field of sacred space and religious pilgrimage.

Principles of Sedimentology and Stratigraphy

Pearson New International Edition

Author: Sam Jr Boggs

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781292021287

Category: Geology, Stratigraphic

Page: 566

View: 7246

This concise treatment of the fundamental principles of sedimentology and stratigraphy highlights the important physical, chemical, biological and stratigraphic characteristics of sedimentary rocks. It emphasizes the ways in which the study of sedimentary rocks is used to interpret depositional environments, changes in ancient sea level, and other intriguing aspects of Earth's history.

Archaeology

An Introduction

Author: Kevin Greene,Tom Moore

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136860290

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 9485

Archaeology: An Introduction looks behind the popular aspects of archaeology such as the discovery and excavation of sites, the study of human remains and animal bones, radiocarbon dating, museums and 'heritage' displays, and reveals the methods used by archaeologists. It also explains how the subject emerged from an amateur pursuit in the eighteenth century into a serious discipline, and explores changing fashions in interpretation in recent decades. This fifth edition has been updated by a new co-author, Tom Moore, and continues to include key references and guidance to help new readers find their way through the ever expanding range of archaeological publications. It conveys the excitement of new archaeological discoveries that appear on television or in newspapers while helping readers to evaluate them by explaining the methods and theories that lie behind them. Above all, while serving as a lucid textbook, it remains a very accessible account that will interest a wide readership. In addition to drawing upon examples and case studies from many regions of the world and periods of the past, it incorporates the authors' own fieldwork, research and teaching and features a new four-colour text design and colour illustrations plus an additional 50 topic boxes. The comprehensive glossary and bibliography are complemented by a support website hosted by Routledge to assist further study and wider learning. It includes chapter overviews, a testbank of questions, powerpoint discussion questions, web-links to support material for every chapter plus an online glossary and image bank. New to the fifth edition: inclusion of the latest survey techniques updated material on the development in dating, DNA analysis, isotopes and population movement coverage of new themes such as identity and personhood how different societies are defined from an anthropological point of view and the implications of this for archaeological interpretation the impact of climate change and sustainability on heritage management more on the history of archaeology Visit the companion website at www.routledge.com/textbooks/greene for additional resources, including: chapter overviews a testbank of questions PowerPoint discussion questions links to support material for every chapter an online glossary and image bank

Thinking About Art

A Thematic Guide to Art History

Author: Penny Huntsman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118905202

Category: Art

Page: 304

View: 5037

Thinking about Art explores some of the greatest works of art and architecture in the world through the prism of themes, instead of chronology, to offer intriguing juxtapositions of art and history. The book ranges across time and topics, from the Parthenon to the present day and from patronage to ethnicity, to reveal art history in new and varied lights. With over 200 colour illustrations and a wealth of formal and contextual analysis, Thinking about Art is a companion guide for art lovers, students and the general reader, and is also the first A-level Art History textbook, written by a skilled and experienced teacher of art history, Penny Huntsman. The book is accompanied by a companion website at www.wiley.com/go/thinkingaboutart.

Second Language Learning and Language Teaching

Fifth Edition

Author: Vivian Cook

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134683227

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 334

View: 8960

Second Language Learning and Language Teaching provides an introduction to the application of second language acquisition research to language teaching. Assuming no previous background in second language acquisition or language teaching methods, this text starts by introducing readers to the basic issues of second language acquisition research. It then examines how people learn particular aspects of the second language, such as grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and the writing system, and at the strategies they adopt in their learning and the differences between individuals. Final chapters look at second language learning in a broader context – the goals of language teaching and how teaching methods relate to SLA research. This newly updated fifth edition builds on the comprehensive scope of earlier editions while also addressing more recent developments in the field, particularly multilingual approaches to language teaching.

Sheela-na-gigs

Unravelling an Enigma

Author: Barbara Freitag

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134282486

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 7406

Here Barbara Freitag examines all the literature on the subject since their discovery 160 years ago, highlighting the inconsistencies of the various interpretations in regard to origin, function and name. By considering the Sheela-na-gigs in their medieval social context, she suggests that they were folk deities with particular responsibility for assistance in childbirth. This fascinating survey sheds new light on a controversial phenomenon, and also contains a complete catalogue of all known Sheela-na-gigs, including hitherto unrecorded or unpublished figures.

Principles and Dynamics of the Critical Zone

Author: N.A

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 0444634126

Category: Science

Page: 674

View: 8543

Principles and Dynamics of the Critical Zone is an invaluable resource for undergraduate and graduate courses and an essential tool for researchers developing cutting-edge proposals. It provides a process-based description of the Critical Zone, a place that The National Research Council (2001) defines as the "heterogeneous, near surface environment in which complex interactions involving rock, soil, water, air, and living organisms regulate the natural habitat and determine the availability of life-sustaining resources." This text provides a summary of Critical Zone research and outcomes from the NSF funded Critical Zone Observatories, providing a process-based description of the Critical Zone in a wide range of environments with a specific focus on the important linkages that exist amongst the processes in each zone. This book will be useful to all scientists and students conducting research on the Critical Zone within and outside the Critical Zone Observatory Network, as well as scientists and students in the geosciences – atmosphere, geomorphology, geology and pedology. The first text to address the principles and concepts of the Critical Zone A comprehensive approach to the processes responsible for the development and structure of the Critical Zone in a number of environments An essential tool for undergraduate and graduate students, and researchers developing cutting-edge proposals

Wine and Society

The Social and Cultural Context of a Drink

Author: Stephen Charters

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0750666358

Category: Social Science

Page: 358

View: 4636

Wine is becoming increasingly popular in the Anglophone world and there are many books available which describe how and where it is made. However, none address the fundamental questions of different structures of production and how the consumer relates to the product - this book is the first to do just that. Wine and Society: the cultural and social context of wine production and consumption looks at the relationship between wine production and marketing, focussing in consumer behaviour and cultural attitudes. Divided into four parts, it examines the context of wine production, the wine consumer and the social context of wine, discussing the following themes: * That the core of wine production and consumption is shaped by historical, geographical and cultural factors. * Wine production - European and new world looking at the different kinds of producer and how the varying background of each shapes their perspective on what they produce * Terroir and appellations: why demarcation and sense of place became important, how they are used to achieve marketing differentiation, and the 'benefits' (or otherwise) to the customer. * The contemporary wine consumer and lifestyle factors - looking at wine clubs, tourism, education, culture and literature * The politics and economics of wine - from supporting rural industries in France to protecting customers from deception and health risks. Suitable for third year and post-graduate students of hospitality, wine (both in production and marketing), wine tourism, gastronomy and related courses, it encourages students to think critically about the issues raised by using real life case studies and examples from around the world, also including press releases and marketing campaigns.

Handbook on Marine Environment Protection

Science, Impacts and Sustainable Management

Author: Markus Salomon,Till Markus

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319601563

Category: Science

Page: 1024

View: 5403

This handbook is the first of its kind to provide a clear, accessible, and comprehensive introduction to the most important scientific and management topics in marine environmental protection. Leading experts discuss the latest perspectives and best practices in the field with a particular focus on the functioning of marine ecosystems, natural processes, and anthropogenic pressures. The book familiarizes readers with the intricacies and challenges of managing coasts and oceans more sustainably, and guides them through the maze of concepts and strategies, laws and policies, and the various actors that define our ability to manage marine activities. Providing valuable thematic insights into marine management to inspire thoughtful application and further study, it is essential reading for marine environmental scientists, policy-makers, lawyers, practitioners and anyone interested in the field.

Fundamentals of Geomorphology

Author: Richard John Huggett

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1317378385

Category: Science

Page: 544

View: 3298

The new fourth edition of Fundamentals of Geomorphology continues to provide a comprehensive introduction to the subject by discussing the latest developments in the field, as well as covering the basics of Earth surface forms and processes. The revised edition has an improved logically cohesive structure, added recent material on Quaternary environments and landscapes, landscape evolution and tectonics, as well as updated information in fast-changing areas such as the application of dating techniques, digital terrain modelling, historical contingency, preglacial landforms, neocatastrophism, and biogeomorphology. The book begins with a consideration of the nature of geomorphology, process and form, history, and geomorphic systems, and moves on to discuss: Endogenic processes: structural landforms associated with plate tectonics and those associated with volcanoes, impact craters, and folds, faults, and joints. Exogenic processes: landforms resulting from, or influenced by, the exogenic agencies of weathering, running water, flowing ice and meltwater, ground ice and frost, the wind, and the sea; landforms developed on limestone; and long-term geomorphology, a discussion of ancient landforms, including palaeosurfaces, stagnant landscape features, and evolutionary aspects of landscape change. Featuring over 400 illustrations, diagrams, and tables, Fundamentals of Geomorphology provides a stimulating and innovative perspective on the key topics and debates within the field of geomorphology. Written in an accessible and lively manner, and providing guides to further reading, chapter summaries, and an extensive glossary of key terms, this is an indispensable undergraduate level textbook for students of physical geography.