We Were Warriors

One Soldier's Story of Brutal Combat

Author: Johnny Mercer

Publisher: Sidgwick & Jackson

ISBN: 1760554111

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 1565

A captain in 29 Commando, Johnny Mercer completed three tours of Afghanistan, the final one as the conflict reached a bloody climax in 2010. That summer, in the hotly contested area of northern Nad-E Ali, he experienced some of the heaviest fighting of the war. He was a Joint Fires Controller who went out on patrol twice a day for 7 months, knowing that in an ambush or brutal close quarter combat, his ability to bring down devastating strikes from artillery or the air could make the difference between life and death. In We Were Warriors he takes us from his commando training to the heat, blood and chaos of battle. With brutal honesty, he describes what it is like to risk your life every day, pushing through the fear that follows watching your friends getting injured and killed. His friend and closest soldier was shot dead next to him, he was left behind on patrol and targeted by the Taleban, and yet he continued to take the fight back to the enemy with a relentless efficiency that came at a high personal cost. Deeply affected by the inadequate care available for veterans and their families in the United Kingdom, he was inspired to run for Parliament in the hope he could improve their plight. Against all the odds, he was elected as MP of Plymouth Moor View on 7 May 2015 and on 1 June he used his maiden speech to lay bare the sacrifice and commitment of his generation of warriors. Unflinching, passionate and laced with wry humour, We Were Warriors is a compelling read.

Once Were Warriors

Author: Alan Duff

Publisher: Univ. of Queensland Press

ISBN: 9780702228292

Category: Domestic fiction

Page: 198

View: 5695

Alan Duff's ground-breaking first novel is one of the most talked-about books ever published in New Zealand and is now the basis of a major New Zealand film. This hard hitting story is a frank and uncompromising portrayal of Maori in New Zealand society. It is a raw and powerful story in which everyone is a victim until the strength and vision of one woman transcends brutality and leads the way to a new life. Alan Duff was born in Rotorua and now lives in Havelock North. He is the author of two novels, Once Were Warriors and One Night Out Stealing and one work of non fiction, Maori, the Crisis and the Challenge.

We Were Soldiers Once . . . and Young

Ia Drang—The Battle That Changed the War in Vietnam

Author: Harold G. Moore,Joseph L. Galloway

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1453293590

Category: History

Page: 453

View: 9136

New York Times Bestseller: A “powerful and epic story . . . the best account of infantry combat I have ever read” (Col. David Hackworth, author of About Face). In November 1965, some 450 men of the First Battalion, Seventh Cavalry, under the command of Lt. Col. Harold Moore, were dropped into a small clearing in the Ia Drang Valley. They were immediately surrounded by 2,000 North Vietnamese soldiers. Three days later, only two and a half miles away, a sister battalion was brutally slaughtered. Together, these actions at the landing zones X-Ray and Albany constituted one of the most savage and significant battles of the Vietnam War. They were the first major engagements between the US Army and the People’s Army of Vietnam. How these Americans persevered—sacrificing themselves for their comrades and never giving up—creates a vivid portrait of war at its most devastating and inspiring. Lt. Gen. Moore and Joseph L. Galloway—the only journalist on the ground throughout the fighting—interviewed hundreds of men who fought in the battle, including the North Vietnamese commanders. Their poignant account rises above the ordeal it chronicles to depict men facing the ultimate challenge, dealing with it in ways they would have once found unimaginable. It reveals to us, as rarely before, man’s most heroic and horrendous endeavor.

Lethal Warriors

When the New Band of Brothers Came Home

Author: David Philipps

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0230104401

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 5504

"They were once known by the famous moniker, Band of Brothers." Now, 60 years later, the army unit from Fort Carson, Colorado calls themselves the "Lethal Warriors," having seen the worst of the violence in Iraq. Many of its members are plagued by Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and some, misdiagnosed or untreated since returning from war, embarked on drug-fuelled crime sprees, some of which resulted in murder. Here, David Philipps applies his piercing insight and relentless investigative skills not only to this particular unit, but to the broader issue of PTSD as it rages throughout the country. He highlights the inspiring story of General Mark Graham, a former commander at Fort Carson and one of the few officers who had the vision and guts to recognize this growing problem and to do something about it. Graham has opened his doors to the community for help, speaking candidly about the issue and offering a potential lifeline to the soldiers, and a solution to this deadly problem."--Provided by publisher.

Twilight Warriors

The Soldiers, Spies, and Special Agents Who Are Revolutionizing the American Way of War

Author: James Kitfield

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0465064701

Category: Political Science

Page: 400

View: 1861

A dramatic portrait of the innovative Special Forces commanders and FBI agents who wage war against America’s hidden enemies

Outside the Wire

American Soldiers' Voices from Afghanistan

Author: Christine Dumaine Leche,Brian Turner

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813934117

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 148

View: 9285

Collects thirty-eight narratives from American soldiers serving in Afghanistan, shedding light on life in a war zone.

The Lost Eleven

The Forgotten Story of Black American Soldiers Brutally Massacred in World War II

Author: Denise George,Robert Child

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101987405

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 5473

Nearly forgotten by history, this is the story of the Wereth Eleven, African-American soldiers who fought courageously for freedom in WWII—only to be ruthlessly executed by Nazi troops during the Battle of the Bulge. Their story was almost forgotten by history. Now known as the Wereth Eleven, these brave African-American soldiers left their homes to join the Allied effort on the front lines of WWII. As members of the 333rd Field Artillery Battalion, they provided crucial fire support at the Siege of Bastogne. Among the few who managed to escape the Nazi’s devastating Ardennes Offensive, they found refuge in the small village of Wereth, Belgium. A farmer and supporter of the Allies took the exhausted and half-starved men into his home. When Nazi authorities learned of their whereabouts, they did not take the soldiers prisoner, but subjected them to torture and execution in a nearby field. Despite their bravery and sacrifice, these eleven soldiers were omitted from the final Congressional War Crimes report of 1949. For seventy years, their files—marked secret—gathered dust in the National Archive. But in 1994, at the site of their execution, a memorial was dedicated to the Wereth Eleven and all African-American soldiers who fought in Europe. Drawing on firsthand interviews with family members and fellow soldiers, The Lost Eleven tells the complete story of these nearly forgotten soldiers, their valor in battle and their tragic end. INCLUDES PHOTOS From the Hardcover edition.

The Chosen Few

A Company of Paratroopers and Its Heroic Struggle to Survive in the Mountains of Afghanistan

Author: Gregg Zoroya

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN: 0306824841

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 6875

The never-before-told story of one of the most decorated units in the war in Afghanistan and its fifteen-month ordeal that culminated in the 2008 Battle of Wanat, the war's deadliest A single company of US paratroopers--calling themselves the "Chosen Few"--arrived in eastern Afghanistan in late 2007 hoping to win the hearts and minds of the remote mountain people and extend the Afghan government's reach into this wilderness. Instead, they spent the next fifteen months in a desperate struggle, living under almost continuous attack, forced into a slow and grinding withdrawal, and always outnumbered by Taliban fighters descending on them from all sides. Month after month, rocket-propelled grenades, rockets, and machine-gun fire poured down on the isolated and exposed paratroopers as America's focus and military resources shifted to Iraq. Just weeks before the paratroopers were to go home, they faced their last--and toughest--fight. Near the village of Wanat in Nuristan province, an estimated three hundred enemy fighters surrounded about fifty of the Chosen Few and others defending a partially finished combat base. Nine died and more than two dozen were wounded that day in July 2008, making it arguably the bloodiest battle of the war in Afghanistan. The Chosen Few would return home tempered by war. Two among them would receive the Medal of Honor. All of them would be forever changed.

Sons and Soldiers

The Untold Story of the Jews Who Escaped the Nazis and Returned with the U.S. Army to Fight Hitler

Author: Bruce Henderson

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062419110

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 7106

Joining the ranks of Unbroken, Band of Brothers, and Boys in the Boat, the little-known saga of young German Jews, dubbed The Ritchie Boys, who fled Nazi Germany in the 1930s, came of age in America, and returned to Europe at enormous personal risk as members of the U.S. Army to play a key role in the Allied victory. In 1942, the U.S. Army unleashed one of its greatest secret weapons in the battle to defeat Adolf Hitler: training nearly 2,000 German-born Jews in special interrogation techniques and making use of their mastery of the German language, history, and customs. Known as the Ritchie Boys, they were sent in small, elite teams to join every major combat unit in Europe, where they interrogated German POWs and gathered crucial intelligence that saved American lives and helped win the war. Though they knew what the Nazis would do to them if they were captured, the Ritchie Boys eagerly joined the fight to defeat Hitler. As they did, many of them did not know the fates of their own families left behind in occupied Europe. Taking part in every major campaign in Europe, they collected key tactical intelligence on enemy strength, troop and armored movements, and defensive positions. A postwar Army report found that more than sixty percent of the credible intelligence gathered in Europe came from the Ritchie Boys. Bruce Henderson draws on personal interviews with many surviving veterans and extensive archival research to bring this never-before-told chapter of the Second World War to light. Sons and Soldiers traces their stories from childhood and their escapes from Nazi Germany, through their feats and sacrifices during the war, to their desperate attempts to find their missing loved ones in war-torn Europe. Sons and Soldiers is an epic story of heroism, courage, and patriotism that will not soon be forgotten.

Crossings

A Doctor-Soldier's Story

Author: Jon Kerstetter

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 1101904380

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 9603

Every juncture in Jon Kerstetter’s life has been marked by a crossing from one world into another: from civilian to doctor to soldier; between healing and waging war; and between compassion and hatred of the enemy. When an injury led to a stroke that ended his careers as a doctor and a soldier, he faced the most difficult crossing of all, a recovery that proved as shattering as war itself. Crossings is a memoir of an improbable, powerfully drawn life, one that began in poverty on the Oneida Reservation in Wisconsin but grew by force of will to encompass a remarkable medical practice. Trained as an emergency physician, Kerstetter’s thirst for intensity led him to volunteer in war-torn Rwanda, Kosovo, and Bosnia, and to join the Army National Guard. His three tours in the Iraq War marked the height of the American struggle there. The story of his work in theater, which involved everything from saving soldiers’ lives to organizing the joint U.S.–Iraqi forensics team tasked with identifying the bodies of Saddam Hussein’s sons, is a bracing, unprecedented evocation of a doctor’s life at war. But war was only the start of Kerstetter’s struggle. The stroke he suffered upon returning from Iraq led to serious cognitive and physical disabilities. His years-long recovery, impeded by near-unbearable pain and complicated by PTSD, meant overcoming the perceived limits of his body and mind and re‑‑ imagining his own capacity for renewal and change. It led him not only to writing as a vocation but to a deeper understanding of how healing means accepting a new identity, and how that acceptance must be fought for with as much tenacity as any battlefield victory.

The Battle Within

A Soldiers Story

Author: Neil Spencer

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781542314466

Category:

Page: 144

View: 9327

"Highly recommended" SOLDIER, Official magazine of the British Army. "Thought provoking and gripping, the battle within is an excellent read." Matt Johnson, author of best seller Wicked Game. Synopsis... From Neil's early days as a bullied schoolboy, to the day he joined the British Army as a combat infantryman and the challenging events that followed. Newly recruited into the Royal Welch Fusiliers and quickly adopted by the mortar platoon, life came both fast and exciting. Within just 12 months, Neil took part in many training exercises in both the UK and aboard. From Parachute training, to covering the National Fire strikes to training as a patrol medic, plus more. He was even planning an attempt on the tough SAS selection course. April 2004. Deployed to Iraq with the mortar platoon and acting as patrol medic. April 21st will remain a day never forgotten. 5 suicide car bombs ripped through Basra leaving over 70 dead including many children, and hundreds badly wounded including Neil who was only 20ft from the blast. Knocked off his feet and hit by shrapnel. For many this would be traumatic enough, but for Neil this was only the beginning of a series of events that would test even the toughest to the limit, possibly beyond. This is the inspiring true story of a mind that cannot be broken.

What It Is Like to Go to War

Author: Karl Marlantes

Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.

ISBN: 0802195148

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 6210

From the author of the award-winning, best-selling novel Matterhorn, comes a brilliant nonfiction book about war In 1968, at the age of twenty-three, Karl Marlantes was dropped into the highland jungle of Vietnam, an inexperienced lieutenant in command of a platoon of forty Marines who would live or die by his decisions. Marlantes survived, but like many of his brothers in arms, he has spent the last forty years dealing with his war experience. In What It Is Like to Go to War, Marlantes takes a deeply personal and candid look at what it is like to experience the ordeal of combat, critically examining how we might better prepare our soldiers for war. Marlantes weaves riveting accounts of his combat experiences with thoughtful analysis, self-examination, and his readings—from Homer to The Mahabharata to Jung. He makes it clear just how poorly prepared our nineteen-year-old warriors are for the psychological and spiritual aspects of the journey. Just as Matterhorn is already being acclaimed as acclaimed as a classic of war literature, What It Is Like to Go to War is set to become required reading for anyone—soldier or civilian—interested in this visceral and all too essential part of the human experience.

Forgotten

The Untold Story of D-Day’s Black Heroes, at Home and at War

Author: Linda Hervieux

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062313819

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 5041

The injustices of 1940s Jim Crow America are brought to life in this extraordinary blend of military and social history—a story that pays tribute to the valor of an all-black battalion whose crucial contributions at D-Day have gone unrecognized to this day. In the early hours of June 6, 1944, the 320th Barrage Balloon Battalion, a unit of African-American soldiers, landed on the beaches of France. Their orders were to man a curtain of armed balloons meant to deter enemy aircraft. One member of the 320th would be nominated for the Medal of Honor, an award he would never receive. The nation’s highest decoration was not given to black soldiers in World War II. Drawing on newly uncovered military records and dozens of original interviews with surviving members of the 320th and their families, Linda Hervieux tells the story of these heroic men charged with an extraordinary mission, whose contributions to one of the most celebrated events in modern history have been overlooked. Members of the 320th—Wilson Monk, a jack-of-all-trades from Atlantic City; Henry Parham, the son of sharecroppers from rural Virginia; William Dabney, an eager 17-year-old from Roanoke, Virginia; Samuel Mattison, a charming romantic from Columbus, Ohio—and thousands of other African Americans were sent abroad to fight for liberties denied them at home. In England and Europe, these soldiers discovered freedom they had not known in a homeland that treated them as second-class citizens—experiences they carried back to America, fueling the budding civil rights movement. In telling the story of the 320th Barrage Balloon Battalion, Hervieux offers a vivid account of the tension between racial politics and national service in wartime America, and a moving narrative of human bravery and perseverance in the face of injustice.

Honourable Warriors

Fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan- A Front-line Account of the British Army's Battle for Helmand

Author: Richard Streatfeild

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473834805

Category: History

Page: 219

View: 7940

In 2009 Major Richard Streatfeild and his men fought for six months against the Taliban in Sangin, northern Helmand. They were engaged in over 800 fire-fights. They were the target of more than 200 improvised explosive devices. Ten men in his company were killed, 50 were wounded. This is their story – and it is the story, from the front line, of Western intervention in Afghanistan. His graphic personal account gives an inside view of the physical, psychological and political battle to come to terms with severe casualties and the stress of battle while seeking the support of the local population. It is also an account of strategy being turned into action - of the essential interplay of the personal and professional in the most testing of circumstances. He describes the day-to-day operations, and he provides a fascinating record of the Taliban's guerrilla tactics and the British response to them. His narrative gives a direct insight into the experiences of soldiers who had to face down their fear throughout a prolonged tour of duty on the Afghan battlefield. His narrative is essential reading for anyone who cares to understand the nature of the war in Afghanistan and how the odds are stacked against the army's success. For the British intervention in Helmand is a microcosm of the Nato-led mission launched against the Taliban and al Qaeda. As seen in The Daily Mail, The Guardian, The Mail on Sunday, Sussex Express and The Argus, Featured on BBC Radio 4 ' The Today' programme and on BBC South East Television

We Were One

Shoulder to Shoulder with the Marines Who Took Fallujah

Author: Patrick O'Donnell,K O'Donnell

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN: 0306815931

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 5023

Five months after being deployed to Iraq, Lima Company’s 1st Platoon, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, found itself in Fallujah, embroiled in some of the most intense house-to-house, hand-to-hand urban combat since World War II. In the city’s bloody streets, they came face-to-face with the enemy-radical insurgents high on adrenaline, fighting to a martyr’s death, and suicide bombers approaching from every corner. Award-winning author and historian Patrick O’Donnell stood shoulder to shoulder with this modern band of brothers as they marched and fought through the streets of Fallujah, and he stayed with them as the casualties mounted.

The Outpost

An Untold Story of American Valor

Author: Jake Tapper

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 0316215856

Category: Political Science

Page: 688

View: 7690

The heartbreaking and inspiring story of one of America's deadliest battles during the war in Afghanistan, acclaimed by critics everywhere as a classic. At 5:58 AM on October 3rd, 2009, Combat Outpost Keating, located in frighteningly vulnerable terrain in Afghanistan just 14 miles from the Pakistani border, was viciously attacked. Though the 53 Americans there prevailed against nearly 400 Taliban fighters, their casualties made it the deadliest fight of the war for the U.S. that year. Four months after the battle, a Pentagon review revealed that there was no reason for the troops at Keating to have been there in the first place. In THE OUTPOST, Jake Tapper gives us the powerful saga of COP Keating, from its establishment to eventual destruction, introducing us to an unforgettable cast of soldiers and their families, and to a place and war that has remained profoundly distant to most Americans. A runaway bestseller, it makes a savage war real, and American courage manifest.

Young Soldiers Amazing Warriors

Inside One of the Most Highly Decorated Battalions of Vietnam

Author: Robert H. Sholly

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780979665233

Category: Vietnam War, 1961-1975

Page: 460

View: 4057

The beginning of the famous "Nine Days in May" battles of the 4th Infantry Division in Vietnam and the heroes who fought them. The early fire fights and battles of one of the most highly decorated battalions of the Vietnam War. Eyewitness accounts of boys become men as they recount the riveting events of fire fights, human wave attacks, hand-to-hand combat, overrun units, survivors, sacrifice, and four Medals of Honor.

Unlikely Warrior

A Jewish Soldier in Hitler's Army

Author: Georg Rauch

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0374301425

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 352

View: 831

"A YA memoir of an 18-year old part-Jewish youth who, despite his heritage, is drafted into Hitler's army and sent to serve on the Russian front"--

We Were Warriors

Author: Johnny Mercer

Publisher: Sidgwick & Jackson

ISBN: 9781509864454

Category: Afghan War, 2001-

Page: 336

View: 1294

A captain in 29 Commando, Johnny Mercer completed three tours of Afghanistan, the final one as the conflict reached a bloody climax in 2010. That summer, in the hotly contested area of northern Nad-E Ali, he experienced some of the heaviest fighting of the war. He was a Joint Fires Controller who went out on patrol twice a day for 7 months, knowing that in an ambush or brutal close quarter combat, his ability to bring down devastating strikes from artillery or the air could make the difference between life and death. In We Were Warriors he takes us from his commando training to the heat, blood and chaos of battle. With brutal honesty, he describes what it is like to risk your life every day, pushing through the fear that follows watching your friends getting injured and killed. His friend and closest soldier was shot dead next to him, he was left behind on patrol and targeted by the Taliban, and yet he continued to take the fight back to the enemy with a relentless efficiency that came at a high personal cost. Deeply affected by the inadequate care available for veterans and their families in the United Kingdom, he was inspired to run for Parliament in the hope he could improve their plight. Against all the odds, he was elected as MP of Plymouth Moor View on 7 May 2015 and on 1 June he used his maiden speech to lay bare the sacrifice and commitment of his generation of warriors. Unflinching, passionate and laced with wry humour, We Were Warriors is a compelling read.

The Beardless Warriors

A Novel of World War II

Author: Richard Matheson

Publisher: Forge Books

ISBN: 9781429913676

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 7585

In 1944, long before he wrote such classic novels as I Am Legend and What Dreams May Come, author Richard Matheson served as an eighteen-year-old replacement in the 87th Division during the latter part of the war in Europe. His tour of duty there inspired this acclaimed novel about a group of equally young and inexperienced soldiers thrown into the fury of combat. The Beardless Warriors are a squad of teenage U.S. infantrymen fighting their way across Germany during the final weeks of the war. Under fire and in over their heads, the fresh-faced young men must grow up fast if they ever hope to see home again. Everett Hackermeyer is the latest soldier to join the squad, "Hack," a troubled youth from a hellish family background, faces a new kind of inferno on the front lines, only to discover hidden reserves he never knew he possessed. Ironically, he doesn't come to value his own life until he runs the very real chance of losing it. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.