Verdi

The Man Revealed

Author: John Suchet

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781783963300

Category: Composers

Page: 288

View: 9509

Genius, patriot, pessimist, atheist: an exploration of Italy's best-loved composer, Giuseppe Verdi

Verdi

The Man Revealed

Author: John Suchet

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781783963317

Category: MUSIC

Page: 347

View: 4135


Verdi: The Man Revealed

Author: John Suchet

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 1681778297

Category: Music

Page: 288

View: 8593

Giuseppe Verdi remains Italy’s greatest operatic composer and a man of apparent contradictions—vividly brought to life through a nuanced examination of his life and monumental music. Giuseppe Verdi remains the greatest operatic composer that Italy, the home of opera, has ever produced. Yet throughout his lifetime he claimed to detest composing and repeatedly rejected it. He was a landowner, a farmer, a politician and symbol of Italian independence; but his music tells a different story. An obsessive perfectionist, Verdi drove collaborators to despair but his works lauded from the start as dazzling feats of composition and characterization. From Rigoletto to Otello, La Traviatato to Aida, Verdi’s canon encompassed the full range of human emotion. His private life was no less complex: he suffered great loss, and went out of his way to antagonize supporters and his own family. An outspoken advocate of Italian independence and a sharp critic of the church, he was often at odds with nineteenth-century society. In Verdi: The Man Revealed, John Suchet attempts to get under the skin of perhaps the most private composer who ever lived. Unraveling his protestations, his deliberate embellishments and disavowals, Suchet reveals the true character of this great artist—and the art for which he will be forever known.

Mozart: The Man Revealed

Author: John Suchet

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 168177576X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 2461

The illustrated life-story of the world’s most beloved composer, bringing vividly to life the man himself, his influences, achievements, and the glittering milieu of the Habsburg empire in eighteenth-century Europe. We think we know the story of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's life. Austrian-born to a tyrannical father who worked him fiercely; unhappily married to a spendthrift woman; a child-like character ill at ease amid the aristocratic splendor of the Viennese court; a musical genius who died young thus depriving the world of future glories. Yet only that last point is actually true. In this comprehensive biography, John Suchet examines the many myths and misunderstandings surrounding the world's best-loved composer. From his early days as a child prodigy performing for the imperial royal family in Vienna to the last months of his short life, driven to exhaustion by a punitive workload, one thing remained constant: his happy disposition. Through trials and tribulations, grand successes and disheartening setbacks, Suchet shows us the real Mozart—blessed with an abundance of talent yet sometimes struggling to earn a living. His mischievous nature and earthy sense of humor, his ease and confidence in his own incredible abilities; these were traits that never left him. His music has brought comfort to countless generations; his life, though brief, is no less fascinating.

Verdi

A Biography

Author: Mary Jane Phillips-Matz

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198166009

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 941

View: 8697

Written with exclusive access to the original Verdi family documents, this book explores the facts behind the myths of this extraordinary figure. Previously unknown aspects of Verdi's life are exposed in this biography, which took 30 years to write.

The Real Traviata

The Song of Marie Duplessis

Author: René Weis,Rene Weis

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198708548

Category: Courtesans

Page: 416

View: 5631

The rags-to-riches story of a tragic young woman whose life inspired one of the most famous operas of all time, Verdi's masterpiece La traviata, as well as one of the most scandalous and most successful French novels of the nineteenth century, La Dame aux Camélias, by Alexandre Dumas fils. The woman at the centre of this story, Marie Duplessis, rose in a remarkably short time from an abused teenage girl in Normandy to become the queen ofParisian courtesans, at the apex of fashionable life in nineteenth century Paris. Her life was painfully short, but by sheer willpower, intelligence, talent, and stunning looks she attained such prominence in the French capitalthat ministers of the government and even members of the French royal family fell under her spell. And although now largely forgotten, in the years immediately after her death, Marie's legend if anything grew in stature, with her immortalization in Verdi's La traviata, an opera in which the great Romantic composer tried to capture her essence in some of the most heart-wrenching and lyrical music ever composed.

The Last Waltz

The Strauss Dynasty and Vienna

Author: John Suchet

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1250094119

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 6540

Captured in a beautiful package, including more than fifty color photographs, The Last Waltz tells the intriguing story of of the Viennese Strauss family known for producing some of the best known, best loved music of the nineteenth century. Johann and Josef Strauss, the Waltz Kings, composed hundreds of instantly recognizable and enduring melodies, including The Blue Danube Waltz, Tales from the Vienna Woods, Voices of Spring and The Radetzky March. Their iconic music has been featured on the scores of nearly a thousand films. Yet despite their success, this was a family riven with tension, feuds and jealousy, living in a country that was undergoing seismic upheaval. Through the personal and political chaos, the Strauss family continued to compose music to which the Viennese – anxious to forget their troubles – could dance and drank champagne, even as their country hurtled towards oblivion at the hands of the First World War. Classical music expert and radio host John Suchet skillfully portrays this gripping story, capturing the family dramas, the tensions, triumphs and disasters against the turbulent backdrop of Austria in the nineteenth century, from revolution to regicide.

Waiting for Verdi

Opera and Political Opinion in Nineteenth-Century Italy, 1815-1848

Author: Mary Ann Smart

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520966570

Category: Music

Page: 256

View: 2406

The name Giuseppe Verdi conjures images of Italians singing opera in the streets and bursting into song at political protests or when facing the firing squad. While many of the accompanying stories were exaggerated, or even invented, by later generations, Verdi's operas—along with those by Rossini, Donizetti, and Mercadante—did inspire Italians to imagine Italy as an independent and unified nation. Capturing what it was like to attend the opera or to join in the music at an aristocratic salon, Waiting for Verdi shows that the moral dilemmas, emotional reactions, and journalistic polemics sparked by these performances set new horizons for what Italians could think, feel, say, and write. Among the lessons taught by this music were that rules enforced by artistic tradition could be broken, that opera could jolt spectators into intense feeling even as it educated them, and that Italy could be in the vanguard of stylistic and technical innovation rather than clinging to the glories of centuries past. More practically, theatrical performances showed audiences that political change really was possible, making the newly engaged spectator in the opera house into an actor on the political stage.

Opera in Seventeenth-Century Venice

The Creation of a Genre

Author: Ellen Rosand

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520254260

Category: History

Page: 710

View: 7732

"In this elegantly constructed study of the early decades of public opera, the conflicts and cooperation of poets, composers, managers, designers, and singers—producing the art form that was soon to sweep the world and that has been dominant ever since—are revealed in their first freshness."—Andrew Porter "This will be a standard work on the subject of the rise of Venetian opera for decades. Rosand has provided a decisive contribution to the reshaping of the entire subject. . . . She offers a profoundly new view of baroque opera based on a solid documentary and historical-critical foundation. The treatment of the artistic self-consciousness and professional activities of the librettists, impresarios, singers, and composers is exemplary, as is the examination of their reciprocal relations. This work will have a positive effect not only on studies of 17th-century, but on the history of opera in general."—Lorenzo Bianconi

Verdi in Victorian London

Author: Massimo Zicari

Publisher: Open Book Publishers

ISBN: 178374216X

Category: Music

Page: 360

View: 8199

Now a byword for beauty, Verdi’s operas were far from universally acclaimed when they reached London in the second half of the nineteenth century. Why did some critics react so harshly? Who were they and what biases and prejudices animated them? When did their antagonistic attitude change? And why did opera managers continue to produce Verdi’s operas, in spite of their alleged worthlessness? Massimo Zicari’s Verdi in Victorian London reconstructs the reception of Verdi’s operas in London from 1844, when a first critical account was published in the pages of The Athenaeum, to 1901, when Verdi’s death received extensive tribute in The Musical Times. In the 1840s, certain London journalists were positively hostile towards the most talked-about representative of Italian opera, only to change their tune in the years to come. The supercilious critic of The Athenaeum, Henry Fothergill Chorley, declared that Verdi’s melodies were worn, hackneyed and meaningless, his harmonies and progressions crude, his orchestration noisy. The scribes of The Times, The Musical World, The Illustrated London News, and The Musical Times all contributed to the critical hubbub. Yet by the 1850s, Victorian critics, however grudging, could neither deny nor ignore the popularity of Verdi’s operas. Over the final three decades of the nineteenth century, moreover, London’s musical milieu underwent changes of great magnitude, shifting the manner in which Verdi was conceptualized and making room for the powerful influence of Wagner. Nostalgic commentators began to lament the sad state of the Land of Song, referring to the now departed "palmy days of Italian opera." Zicari charts this entire cultural constellation. Verdi in Victorian London is required reading for both academics and opera aficionados. Music specialists will value a historical reconstruction that stems from a large body of first-hand source material, while Verdi lovers and Italian opera addicts will enjoy vivid analysis free from technical jargon. For students, scholars and plain readers alike, this book is an illuminating addition to the study of music reception.

The Man Verdi

Author: Frank Walker

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226871320

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 526

View: 8139

Explores the nineteenth-century Italian composer's childhood, youth, and adult relationships with relatives, students, wives, and musical colleagues

The Summer I Wasn't Me

Author: Jessica Verdi

Publisher: Sourcebooks, Inc.

ISBN: 140227789X

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 352

View: 528

Lexi has a secret. She never meant for her mom to find out. And now she's afraid that what's left of her family is going to fall apart for good. Lexi knows she can fix everything. She can change. She can learn to like boys. New Horizons summer camp has promised to transform her life, and there's nothing she wants more than to start over. But sometimes love has its own path... "A powerful indictment of reparative therapy—a sweet love story—and an unforgettable main character!"—Nancy Garden, author of Annie on My Mind "Unflinching honesty and unfaltering compassion...A gem of a novel."—RT Book Reviews, 4 1⁄2 stars, Top Pick of the Month on My Life After Now

William Styron

A Life

Author: James L. W. West

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1453202862

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 506

View: 499

A compelling and authoritative portrait of an American literary master William Styron was one of the most highly regarded and controversial authors of his generation. In this illuminating biography, James L. W. West III draws upon letters, papers, and manuscripts as well as interviews with Styron’s friends and family to recount in rich detail the experiences that shaped each of his groundbreaking books. From Styron’s Southern upbringing, which deeply influenced the Pulitzer Prize–winning The Confessions of Nat Turner and National Book Award–winning Sophie’s Choice, to his feud with Norman Mailer and the clinical depression that led to his acclaimed memoir Darkness Visible, West’s remarkable biography provides invaluable insight into the life and works of a giant of American literature.

Riccardo Muti, an Autobiography

First the Music, Then the Words

Author: Riccardo Muti

Publisher: Rizzoli International Publications

ISBN: 9780847837243

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 244

View: 7993

The beloved conductor reflects on his fifty-year career with the world's leading opera houses and orchestras and shares personal anecdotes of working with eminent musicians as well as offering insight into his innovative conducting style.

The Man of Feeling

Author: Javier Marias

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0804172609

Category: Fiction

Page: 192

View: 5677

A story of love and memory. On a train journey from Paris to Madrid a young opera singer becomes fascinated by those in his compartment: a middle-aged businessman, his alluring wife and their male traveling companion. Soon his life of constant travel, luxury hotels, rehearsal and performance will become entangled with these three people, and the singer will find himself fatefully consumed by Natalia's beauty. The Man of Feeling is the haunting story of the birth and death of a passion, told in retrospect. Intricately interweaving desire and memory, it explores the nature of love, and asks whether we can ever truly recall something that no longer exists.

Verdi's Operas

An Illustrated Survey of Plots, Characters, Sources, and Criticism

Author: Giorgio Bagnoli

Publisher: Amadeus Press

ISBN: 9781574674484

Category: Music

Page: 215

View: 2637

Giuseppe Verdi's operas have a special place in the hearts of audiences and in music history. They are grand in scale and yet intensely human in their ability to convey the joys and sorrows of ordinary people. Celebrated as a national treasure and venerated for his civic, historical, and musical influence, Verdi enjoyed an enviable and almost uninterrupted success with the public throughout his long lifetime and a corresponding posthumous glory that never seems to wane. In Verdi's Operas, each of Verdi's 26 operas is studied in detail, the plots are described act by act, and the works are analysed and placed in the context of history and of the composer's creative career. The book also examines the literary sources that inspired the maestro's dramaturgy and presents profiles of the librettists who worked with him at the time. Lavishly illustrated with striking artwork, photos, and scenes from Verdi productions, this book will delight opera buffs and casual readers alike.

The Noise of Time

A novel

Author: Julian Barnes

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 110194725X

Category: Fiction

Page: 224

View: 9639

A compact masterpiece dedicated to the Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich: Julian Barnes’s first novel since his best-selling, Man Booker Prize–winning The Sense of an Ending. In 1936, Shostakovich, just thirty, fears for his livelihood and his life. Stalin, hitherto a distant figure, has taken a sudden interest in his work and denounced his latest opera. Now, certain he will be exiled to Siberia (or, more likely, executed on the spot), Shostakovich reflects on his predicament, his personal history, his parents, various women and wives, his children—and all who are still alive themselves hang in the balance of his fate. And though a stroke of luck prevents him from becoming yet another casualty of the Great Terror, for decades to come he will be held fast under the thumb of despotism: made to represent Soviet values at a cultural conference in New York City, forced into joining the Party and compelled, constantly, to weigh appeasing those in power against the integrity of his music. Barnes elegantly guides us through the trajectory of Shostakovich’s career, at the same time illuminating the tumultuous evolution of the Soviet Union. The result is both a stunning portrait of a relentlessly fascinating man and a brilliant exploration of the meaning of art and its place in society. From the Hardcover edition.

Opera, Or, The Undoing of Women

Author: Catherine Clément

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 9781860641138

Category: Feminism and music

Page: 198

View: 5558

A penetrating and poetic insight into the tragic fate of women in opera, Clement looks at over thirty major operatic works and reveals both her love for opera and her sense, as a woman, of betrayal by it.

The last prima donnas

Author: Lanfranco Rasponi

Publisher: Limelight Editions : Distributed by Harper & Row, 1985

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 635

View: 5138

Interviews with fifty-six great operatic divas of the twentieth century illuminate their lives, their art, and the world of modern opera

The Real Toscanini

Musicians Reveal the Maestro

Author: Cesare Civetta

Publisher: Hal Leonard Corporation

ISBN: 1574674161

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 7402

(Amadeus). Lauded by Verdi, Debussy, and other music legends, the celebrated conductor Arturo Toscanini raised the standards of orchestral and operatic performance over an astonishing 69 years on the podium. But as he did so, he acquired a reputation as something of a tyrant, who unleashed an explosive temper at musicians if rehearsals did not meet his expectations. In The Real Toscanini , Cesare Civetta presents an intriguing collection of vivid, one-of-a-kind interviews with artists who performed with Toscanini. A portrait of the inner workings of the maestro emerges through these extensive conversations, conducted by the author over a period of 20 years, together with other firsthand recollections. These accounts clarify Toscanini's philosophy, musical style, and techniques. They depict a man tormented by inner demons of anger and depression, which were easily triggered by his frustration at being unable to produce the musical ideal in his mind's ear. Toscanini is also revealed as a vehement anti-Fascist and an unequivocal opponent of totalitarianism and racism he defied Mussolini and publically opposed Hitler. The book includes a comprehensive account of his 1936 inauguration of what is now known as the Israel Philharmonic, in solidarity with Jewish refugee musicians. Toscanini comes through in this book as a tortured but deeply humane individual who strove to constantly improve a sincere and humble musician who was nevertheless the preeminent maestro of the 20th century.