Urban Sustainability

Reconnecting Space and Place

Author: Ann Dale,William Terrance Dushenko,Pamela J. Robinson

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442612886

Category: Political Science

Page: 286

View: 8160

This book explores concrete ways to achieve urban sustainability based on integrated planning, policy development, and decision-making.

Urban Sustainability

A Global Perspective

Author: Igor Vojnovic

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781611860559

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 685

View: 4720

More than half the world's population currently lives in urban areas, and virtually all of the world's population growth over the next three decades is expected to be in cities. What impact will this growth have on the environment? What can we do now to pave the way for resource longevity? Sustainability has received considerable attention in recent years, though conceptions of the term remain vague. Using a wide array of cities around the globe as case studies, this timely book explores the varying nature of global urban-environmental stresses and the complexities involved in defining sustainability policies. Working with six core themes, the editor examines the past, present, and future of urban sustainability within local, national, and global contexts.

Handbook on Urban Sustainability

Author: Nolberto Munier

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9789401776684

Category:

Page: 836

View: 3993

A PARAMOUNT CONCEPT The following article, authored by Mathis Wackernagel et al, illustrates the Ecological Footprint concept developed by William Rees and Mathis Wackernagel (1996). This is a fundamental concept to measure sustainability and the unequal use of land resources on the planet. The Ecological Footprint is mentioned many times in this book in different chapters, showing its importance. For this reason it is believed that the inclusion of this paper as a preface to this handbook will not only enhance the reader s understanding of the concept but will also aid in understanding further chapters. Nolberto Munier Editor THE ECOLOGICAL FOOTPRINT OF CITIES AND REGIONS: COMPARING RESOURCE * AVAILABILITY WITH RESOURCE DEMAND By Mathis Wackernagel, Justin Kitzes, Dan Moran, Steven Goldfinger and Mary Thomas SUMMARY: Cities and regions depend on resources and ecological services from distant ecosystems. The well-being of city and region residents is affected by both the health and availability of these ecosystems, especially in today s ecologically strained world. *Reprinted by permission of Sage Publications Ltd. from: Wackernagel, Mathis et al, The ecological footprint of cities and regions: comparing resource availability with resource demand, Environment and Urbanization, Vol. 18, No. 1, in press. ((c)Sage Publications Ltd., 2006). 1 (c) Sage Publications, 2006 2 Preface The management of a city or region s resource metabolism, including the natural capital that supports these flows, is becoming increasingly a central concern to cities and regions that want to succeed."

Big Data for Urban Sustainability

A Human-Centered Perspective

Author: Stephen Jia Wang,Patrick Moriarty

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319736108

Category: Science

Page: 160

View: 5450

This book presents a practical framework for the application of big data, cloud, and pervasive and complex systems to sustainable solutions for urban environmental challenges. It covers the technologies, potential, and possible and impact of big data on energy efficiency and the urban environment. The book first introduces key aspects of big data, cloud services, pervasive computing, and mobile technologies from a pragmatic design perspective, including sample open source firmware. Cloud services, mobile and embedded platforms, interfaces, operating system design methods, networking, and middleware are all considered. The authors then explore in detail the framework, design principles, architecture and key components of developing energy systems to support sustainable urban environments. The included case study provides a pathway to improve the eco-efficiency of urban transport, demonstrating how to design an energy efficient next generation urban navigation system by leveraging vast cloud data sets on user-behavior. Ultimately, this resource maps big data’s pivotal intersection with rapid global urbanization along the path to a sustainable future.

Cities and Climate Change

Urban Sustainability and Global Environmental Governance

Author: Harriet Bulkeley,Michele Merrill Betsill

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415359160

Category: Science

Page: 237

View: 3742

Climate change is one of the most challenging issues of our time. As key sites in the production and management of emissions of greenhouse gases, cities will be crucial for the implementation of international agreements and national policies on climate change. This book provides a critical analysis of the role of cities in addressing climate change and the prospects for urban sustainability. Cities and Climate Change is the first in-depth analysis of the role of cities in addressing climate change. The book argues that key challenges concerning the resources and powers of local government, as well as conflicts between local goals for economic development and climate change mitigation, have restricted the level of local action on climate change. These findings have significant implications for the prospects of mitigating climate change and achieving urban sustainability. This book provides a valuable interdisciplinary analysis of these issues, and will appeal to students and researchers interested in sustainability at local and global scales.

Urban Sustainability and River Restoration

Green and Blue Infrastructure

Author: Katia Perini,Paola Sabbion

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 111924496X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 8183

13.1.3 Policies and local community -- References -- Chapter 13.2: Los Angeles River, USA - Opportunities and Policies -- 13.2.1 River revitalization plans -- 13.2.2 Costs and benefits -- 13.2.3 Community involvement -- References -- Chapter 13.3: Madrid Río, Spain - Opportunities and Policies -- 13.3.1 Project development -- 13.3.2 Project costs and benefits -- References -- Chapter 13.4: Paillon River, France - Opportunities and Policies -- 13.4.1 Framework of French water policies -- 13.4.2 Local policies and projects -- References -- Chapter 13.5: River Thames, England - Opportunities and Policies -- 13.5.1 Water policy framework and planning strategies -- 13.5.2 Local policies and projects -- 13.5.3 Project costs and benefits -- References -- Chapter 13.6: Emscher River, Germany - Opportunities and Policies -- 13.6.1 Project development -- 13.6.2 Policies and participation -- 13.6.3 Project costs and benefits -- References -- Index -- End User License Agreement

Urban Sustainability in Theory and Practice

Circles of sustainability

Author: Paul James

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317658361

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 260

View: 6608

Cities are home to the most consequential current attempts at human adaptation and they provide one possible focus for the flourishing of life on this planet. However, for this to be realized in more than an ad hoc way, a substantial rethinking of current approaches and practices needs to occur. Urban Sustainability in Theory and Practice responds to the crises of sustainability in the world today by going back to basics. It makes four major contributions to thinking about and acting upon cities. It provides a means of reflexivity learning about urban sustainability in the process of working practically for positive social development and projected change. It challenges the usually taken-for-granted nature of sustainability practices while providing tools for modifying those practices. It emphasizes the necessity of a holistic and integrated understanding of urban life. Finally it rewrites existing dominant understandings of the social whole such as the triple-bottom line approach that reduce environmental questions to externalities and social questions to background issues. The book is a much-needed practical and conceptual guide for rethinking urban engagement. Covering the full range of sustainability domains and bridging discourses aimed at academics and practitioners, this is an essential read for all those studying, researching and working in urban geography, sustainability assessment, urban planning, urban sociology and politics, sustainable development and environmental studies.

Urban Sustainability Transitions

Author: Niki Frantzeskaki,Vanesa Castán Broto,Lars Coenen,Derk Loorbach

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1351855964

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 402

View: 5590

The world’s population is currently undergoing a significant transition towards urbanisation, with the UN expecting that 70% of people globally will live in cities by 2050. Urbanisation has multiple political, cultural, environmental and economic dimensions that profoundly influence social development and innovation. This fundamental long-term transformation will involve the realignment of urban society’s technologies and infrastructures, culture and lifestyles, as well as governance and institutional frameworks. Such structural systemic realignments can be referred to as urban sustainability transitions: fundamental and structural changes in urban systems through which persistent societal challenges are addressed, such as shifts towards urban farming, renewable decentralised energy systems, and social economies. This book provides new insights into how sustainability transitions unfold in different types of cities across the world and explores possible strategies for governing urban transitions, emphasising the co-evolution of material and institutional transformations in socio-technical and socio-ecological systems. With case studies of mega-cities such as Seoul, Tokyo, New York and Adelaide, medium-sized cities such as Copenhagen, Cape Town and Portland, and nonmetropolitan cities such as Freiburg, Ghent and Brighton, the book provides an opportunity to reflect upon the comparability and transferability of theoretical/conceptual constructs and governance approaches across geographical contexts. Urban Sustainability Transitions is key reading for students and scholars working in Environmental Sciences, Geography, Urban Studies, Urban Policy and Planning.

Governing Urban Sustainability

Comparing Cities in the USA and Germany

Author: Lisa Pettibone

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317125444

Category: Political Science

Page: 200

View: 8554

In her study of the interactions between tools of urban sustainability governance in key cities, Lisa Pettibone argues that a new factor-sustainability-minded groups-may be critical to building momentum for sustainability. The book presents in-depth case studies of six cities in the USA and Germany: New York, Portland, Seattle, Berlin, Hamburg, and Heidelburg. Drawing on 75 interviews, document analysis, and a bilingual literature review, the book analyzes how sustainability is politically constructed in city strategic plans and sustainability indicators. The volume provides a comprehensive introduction to the principles of sustainability, discusses the key governance instruments relevant to urban sustainability, and delivers new empirical and theoretical material on their role in a sustainability transition. It concludes that despite the national-level differences, cities’ experiences in both countries are similar. Political sustainability at the city level differs in several important ways from academic principles of sustainability. Finally, it proposes that sustainability-minded groups may be a key link to connect urban sustainability in practice to theoretical concepts.

Pathways to Urban Sustainability

Challenges and Opportunities for the United States

Author: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine,Policy and Global Affairs,Science and Technology for Sustainability Program,Committee on Pathways to Urban Sustainability: Challenges and Opportunities

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 0309444535

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 192

View: 6264

Cities have experienced an unprecedented rate of growth in the last decade. More than half the world’s population lives in urban areas, with the U.S. percentage at 80 percent. Cities have captured more than 80 percent of the globe’s economic activity and offered social mobility and economic prosperity to millions by clustering creative, innovative, and educated individuals and organizations. Clustering populations, however, can compound both positive and negative conditions, with many modern urban areas experiencing growing inequality, debility, and environmental degradation. The spread and continued growth of urban areas presents a number of concerns for a sustainable future, particularly if cities cannot adequately address the rise of poverty, hunger, resource consumption, and biodiversity loss in their borders. Intended as a comparative illustration of the types of urban sustainability pathways and subsequent lessons learned existing in urban areas, this study examines specific examples that cut across geographies and scales and that feature a range of urban sustainability challenges and opportunities for collaborative learning across metropolitan regions. It focuses on nine cities across the United States and Canada (Los Angeles, CA, New York City, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Pittsburgh, PA, Grand Rapids, MI, Flint, MI, Cedar Rapids, IA, Chattanooga, TN, and Vancouver, Canada), chosen to represent a variety of metropolitan regions, with consideration given to city size, proximity to coastal and other waterways, susceptibility to hazards, primary industry, and several other factors.

Pathways to Urban Sustainability

Research and Development on Urban Systems: Summary of a Workshop

Author: National Research Council,Policy and Global Affairs,Science and Technology for Sustainability Program,Committee on the Challenge of Developing Sustainable Urban Systems

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 0309158958

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 124

View: 6303

More than half of the world's people now live in cities. In the United States, the figure is 80 percent. It is worthwhile to consider how this trend of increased urbanization, if inevitable, could be made more sustainable. One fundamental shortcoming of urban research and programs is that they sometimes fail to recognize urban areas as systems. Current institutions and actors are not accustomed to exploring human-environment interactions, particularly at an urban-scale. The fact is that these issues involve complex interactions, many of which are not yet fully understood. Thus a key challenge for the 21st century is this: How can we develop sustainable urban systems that provide healthy, safe and affordable environments for the growing number of Americans living in cities and their surrounding metropolitan areas? To address this question, the National Research Council organized a workshop exploring the landscape of urban sustainability research programs in the United States. The workshop, summarized in this volume, was designed to allow participants to share information about the activities and planning efforts of federal agencies, along with related initiatives by universities, the private sector, nongovernmental groups, state and local agencies, and international organizations. Participants were encouraged to explore how urban sustainability can move beyond analyses devoted to single disciplines and sectors to systems-level thinking and effective interagency cooperation. To do this, participants examined areas of potential coordination among different R&D programs, with special consideration given to how the efforts of federal agencies can best complement and leverage the efforts of other key stakeholders. Pathways to Urban Sustainability offers a broad contextual summary of workshop presentations and discussions for distribution to federal agencies, regional organizations, academic institutions, think tanks and other groups engaged in urban research.

Governance for Urban Sustainability and Resilience

Responding to Climate Change and the Relevance of the Built Environment

Author: Jeroen van der Heijden

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN: 1782548130

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 256

View: 3281

Cities, and the built environment more broadly, are key in the global response to climate change. This groundbreaking book seeks to understand what governance tools are best suited for achieving cities that are less harmful to the natural environment,

Access to Microfinance and Financial Training for Innovative Urban Sustainability

Collective Investments at the Bottom of t

Author: Mutisya, Emmanuel Musau

Publisher: Langaa RPCIG

ISBN: 995679287X

Category: Social Science

Page: 270

View: 2129

The Kenyan population is highly concentrated in urban centres, leading to increased social, economic and environmental strains, with a significant percentage of urban dwellers living in sprawling slums. Urban development is increasingly a major focus, especially in the fight against urban sustainability problems. There is little practical orientation in the academic literature for the growing gap between the rich and poor. Current literature is enormously concerned with resource use and environmental pressures, paying scant attention to the nexus between urban sustainability and empowerment of the urban poor. This book initiates debates on the segment of urban population often referred to as "the bottom of the pyramid (BOP)", by analysing the microfinance innovation following evaluation of the impacts of access to microfinance and financial training and the implications to urban sustainability in Kenya. The main conclusion reached is that microfinance has an instrumental role to play in promoting sustainable urban development as it supports social welfare improvement and increases the livelihood of participants, business development and urban sustainability to a certain extent, thereby empowering the urban poor in contributing to poverty alleviation.

Urban Sustainability Through Environmental Design

Approaches to Time-People-Place Responsive Urban Spaces

Author: Kevin Thwaites,Sergio Porta,Ombretta Romice,Mark Greaves

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1134157673

Category: Architecture

Page: 200

View: 6975

What can architects, landscape architects and urban designers do to make urban open spaces, streets and squares, more responsive, lively and safe? Urban Sustainability through Environmental Design answers this question by providing the analytical tools and practical methodologies that can be employed for sustainable solutions to the design and management of urban environments. The book calls into question the capability of ‘quick-fix’ development solutions to provide the establishment of fixed communities and suggests a more time-conscious and evolutionary approach. This is the first significant book to draw together a pan-European view on sustainable urban design with a specific focus on social sustainability. It presents an innovative approach that focuses on the tools of urban analysis rather than the interventions themselves. With its practical approach and wide-ranging discussion, this book will appeal to all those involved in producing communities and spaces for sustainable living, from students to academics through to decision makers and professional leaders.

Growing Greener Cities

Urban Sustainability in the Twenty-First Century

Author: Eugenie L. Birch,Susan M. Wachter

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812204093

Category: Political Science

Page: 424

View: 3320

Nineteenth-century landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted described his most famous project, the design of New York's Central Park, as "a democratic development of highest significance." Over the years, the significance of green in civic life has grown. In twenty-first-century America, not only open space but also other issues of sustainability—such as potable water and carbon footprints—have become crucial elements in the quality of life in the city and surrounding environment. Confronted by a U.S. population that is more than 70 percent urban, growing concern about global warming, rising energy prices, and unabated globalization, today's decision makers must find ways to bring urban life into balance with the Earth in order to sustain the natural, economic, and political environment of the modern city. In Growing Greener Cities, a collection of essays on urban sustainability and environmental issues edited by Eugenie L. Birch and Susan M. Wachter, scholars and practitioners alike promote activities that recognize and conserve nature's ability to sustain urban life. These essays demonstrate how partnerships across professional organizations, businesses, advocacy groups, governments, and individuals themselves can bring green solutions to cities from London to Seattle. Beyond park and recreational spaces, initiatives that fall under the green umbrella range from public transit and infrastructure improvement to aquifer protection and urban agriculture. Growing Greener Cities offers an overview of the urban green movement, case studies in effective policy implementation, and tools for measuring and managing success. Thoroughly illustrated with color graphs, maps, and photographs, Growing Greener Cities provides a panoramic view of urban sustainability and environmental issues for green-minded city planners, policy makers, and citizens.

Emerald Cities

Urban Sustainability and Economic Development

Author: Joan Fitzgerald

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199759316

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 256

View: 7095

Here is a refreshing look at how American cities are leading the way toward greener, cleaner, and more sustainable forms of economic development. In Emerald Cities, Joan Fitzgerald shows how in the absence of a comprehensive national policy, cities like Chicago, New York, Portland, San Francisco, and Seattle have taken the lead in addressing the interrelated environmental problems of global warming, pollution, energy dependence, and social justice. Cities are major sources of pollution but because of their population density, reliance on public transportation, and other factors, Fitzgerald argues that they are uniquely suited to promote and benefit from green economic development. For cities facing worsening budget constraints, investing in high-paying green jobs in renewable energy technology, construction, manufacturing, recycling, and other fields will solve two problems at once, sparking economic growth while at the same time dramatically improving quality of life. Fitzgerald also examines how investing in green research and technology may help to revitalize older industrial cities and offers examples of cities that don't make the top-ten green lists such as Toledo and Cleveland, Ohio and Syracuse, New York. And for cities wishing to emulate those already engaged in developing greener economic practices, Fitzgerald shows which strategies will be most effective according to each city's size, economic history, geography, and other unique circumstances. But cities cannot act alone, and Fitzgerald analyzes the role of state and national government policy in helping cities create the next wave of clean technology growth. Lucid, forward-looking, and guided by a level-headed optimism that clearly distinguishes between genuine progress and exaggerated claims, Emerald Cities points the way toward a sustainable future for the American city.

Seattle and the Roots of Urban Sustainability

Inventing Ecotopia

Author: Jeffrey Craig Sanders

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre

ISBN: 0822977575

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 7472

Seattle, often called the “Emerald City,” did not achieve its green, clean, and sustainable environment easily. This thriving ecotopia is the byproduct of continuing efforts by residents, businesses, and civic leaders alike. In Seattle and the Roots of Urban Sustainability, Jeffrey Craig Sanders examines the rise of environmental activism in Seattle amidst the “urban crisis” of the 1960s and its aftermath. Like much activism during this period, the environmental movement began at the grassroots level—in local neighborhoods over local issues. Sanders links the rise of local environmentalism to larger movements for economic, racial, and gender equality and to a counterculture that changed the social and political landscape. He examines emblematic battles that erupted over the planned demolition of Pike Place Market, a local landmark, and environmental organizing in the Central District during the War on Poverty. Sanders also relates the story of Fort Lawton, a decommissioned army base, where Audubon Society members and Native American activists feuded over future land use. The rise and popularity of environmental consciousness among Seattle’s residents came to influence everything from industry to politics, planning, and global environmental movements. Yet, as Sanders reveals, it was in the small, local struggles that urban environmental activism began.

Green Gentrification

Urban sustainability and the struggle for environmental justice

Author: Kenneth A. Gould,Tammy L. Lewis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317417798

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 182

View: 7089

Green Gentrification looks at the social consequences of urban "greening" from an environmental justice and sustainable development perspective. Through a comparative examination of five cases of urban greening in Brooklyn, New York, it demonstrates that such initiatives, while positive for the environment, tend to increase inequality and thus undermine the social pillar of sustainable development. Although greening is ostensibly intended to improve environmental conditions in neighborhoods, it generates green gentrification that pushes out the working-class, and people of color, and attracts white, wealthier in-migrants. Simply put, urban greening "richens and whitens," remaking the city for the sustainability class. Without equity-oriented public policy intervention, urban greening is negatively redistributive in global cities. This book argues that environmental injustice outcomes are not inevitable. Early public policy interventions aimed at neighborhood stabilization can create more just sustainability outcomes. It highlights the negative social consequences of green growth coalition efforts to green the global city, and suggests policy choices to address them. The book applies the lessons learned from green gentrification in Brooklyn to urban greening initiatives globally. It offers comparison with other greening global cities. This is a timely and original book for all those studying environmental justice, urban planning, environmental sociology, and sustainable development as well as urban environmental activists, city planners and policy makers interested in issues of urban greening and gentrification.

Global Planning Innovations for Urban Sustainability

Author: Sébastien Darchen,Glen Searle

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 135112420X

Category: Architecture

Page: 216

View: 6879

As the world becomes more urbanised, solutions are required to solve current challenges for three arenas of sustainability: social sustainability, environmental sustainability and urban economic sustainability. This edited volume interrogates innovative solutions for sustainability in cities around the world. The book draws on a group of 12 international case studies, including Vancouver and Calgary in Canada, San Francisco and Los Angeles in the US (North America), Yogyakarta in Indonesia, Seoul in Korea (South-East Asia), Medellin in Colombia (South America), Helsinki in Finland, Freiburg in Germany and Seville in Spain (Europe). Each case study provides key facts about the city, presents the particular urban sustainability challenge and the planning innovation process and examines what trade-offs were made between social, environmental and economic sustainability. Importantly, the book analyses to what extent these planning innovations can be translated from one context to another. This book will be essential reading to students, academics and practitioners of urban planning, urban sustainability, urban geography, architecture, urban design, environmental sciences, urban studies and politics.