Urban Megaprojects

A Worldwide View

Author: Gerardo del Cerro Santamaría

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN: 1781905932

Category: Social Science

Page: 353

View: 8289

"Megaprojects are springing up throughout both the developed and developing world. Their popularity reflects the drive by political and economic elites to enhance urban competitiveness. Although the idea to construct very large urban complexes can be attributed to globalization, the particular political forces behind them, their urban contexts, and physical outcomes vary from place to place. In this fascinating compendium of case studies a range of authors from different disciplines delineate the forces shaping and resisting large-scale urban development in a variety of settings and place their empirical findings within the framework of urban theory. This book is essential reading for students of urban politics, planning, sociology, and geography." - Susan Fainstein, Senior Research Fellow, Harvard Graduate School of Design, and author, The Just City "The political embrace of city competition has combined with the globalization of banking, real estate, and architecture to make mega-projects seemingly inevitable. What better time, with the world economy slowed, to delve into the motivations for and consequences of the now-ubiquitous and globally-entrenched megaproject. Read this book to discover how the complexities and promises of this form of urban development have intrigued urban scholars and civic boosters alike." - Robert Beauregard, Professor of Urban Planning and Chair of the Urban Planning Doctoral Committee, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, Columbia University "Urban Megaprojects: A Worldwide View is an excellent exposition of the so-called "megaprojects paradox": Megaprojects are increasingly used to build and transform cities, but megaprojects have a dismal track record of delivering on the promised benefits. The book's combination of global and local perspectives on megaprojects is highly effective for understanding the issues at hand." - Bent Flyvbjerg, Professor of Major Programme Management at Oxford University, principal author of Megaprojects and Risk: An Anatomy of Ambition

The Oxford Handbook of Megaproject Management

Author: Bent Flyvbjerg

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191046167

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 568

View: 8883

The Oxford Handbook of Megaproject Management provides state-of-the-art scholarship in the emerging field of megaproject management. Megaprojects are large, complex projects which typically cost billions of dollars and impact millions of people, like building a high-speed rail line, a megadam, a national health or pensions IT system, a new wide-body aircraft, or staging the Olympics. The book contains 25 chapters written especially for this volume, covering all aspects of megaproject management, from front-end planning to actual project delivery, including how to deal with stakeholders, risk, finance, complexity, innovation, governance, ethics, project breakdowns, and scale itself. Individual chapters cover the history of the field and relevant theory, from behavioral economics to lock-in and escalation to systems integration and theories of agency and power. All geographies are covered - from the US to China, Europe to Africa, South America to Australia - as are a wide range of project types, from "hard" infrastructure to "soft" change projects. In-depth case studies illustrate salient points. The Handbook offers a rigorous, research-oriented, up-to-date academic view of the discipline, based on high-quality data and strong theory. It will be an indispensable resource for students, academics, policy makers, and practitioners.

New York's New Edge

Contemporary Art, the High Line, and Urban Megaprojects on the Far West Side

Author: David Halle,Elisabeth Tiso

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022603254X

Category: Social Science

Page: 432

View: 3411

The story of New York’s west side no longer stars the Sharks and the Jets. Instead it’s a story of urban transformation, cultural shifts, and an expanding contemporary art scene. The Chelsea Gallery District has become New York’s most dominant neighborhood for contemporary art, and the streets of the west side are filled with gallery owners, art collectors, and tourists. Developments like the High Line, historical preservation projects like the Gansevoort Market, the Chelsea galleries, and plans for megaprojects like the Hudson Yards Development have redefined what is now being called the “Far West Side” of Manhattan. David Halle and Elisabeth Tiso offer a deep analysis of the transforming district in New York’s New Edge, and the result is a new understanding of how we perceive and interpret culture and the city in New York’s gallery district. From individual interviews with gallery owners to the behind-the-scenes politics of preservation initiatives and megaprojects, the book provides an in-depth account of the developments, obstacles, successes, and failures of the area and the factors that have contributed to them.

Smart Urban Regeneration

Visions, Institutions and Mechanisms for Real Estate

Author: Simon Huston

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317388429

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 322

View: 2785

The role of real estate in our cities is crucial to building sustainable and resilient urban futures. Smart Urban Regeneration brings together institutional, planning and real estate insights into an innovative regeneration framework for academics, students and property professionals. Starting by identifying key urban issues within the historical urban and planning backdrop, the book goes on to explore future visions, the role of institutions and key mechanisms for smart urban regeneration. Throughout the book, international case studies and discussion questions help to draw out global implications for urban stakeholders. Real estate professionals face a real challenge to build visionary developments which resonate locally yet mitigate climate change and curb sprawl, and foster biodiversity. By avoiding the dangers of speculative excess on one side and complacency on the other, Smart Urban Regeneration shows how transformation aspirations can be achieved sustainably. Academics, students and professionals who are involved in real estate, urban planning, property investment, community development and sustainability will find this book an essential guide to smart urban regeneration investment.

Mega-Projects

The Changing Politics of Urban Public Investment

Author: Alan A. Altshuler,David E. Luberoff

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

ISBN: 9780815701309

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 9881

Since the demise of urban renewal in the early 1970s, the politics of large-scale public investment in and around major American cities has received little scholarly attention. In MEGA-PROJECTS, Alan Altshuler and David Luberoff analyze the unprecedented wave of large-scale (mega-) public investments that occurred in American cities during the 1950s and 1960s; the social upheavals they triggered, which derailed large numbers of projects during the late 1960s and early 1970s; and the political impulses that have shaped a new generation of urban mega-projects in the decades since. They also appraise the most important consequences of policy shifts over this half-century and draw out common themes from the rich variety of programmatic and project developments that they chronicle. The authors integrate narratives of national as well as state and local policymaking, and of mobilization by (mainly local) project advocates, with a profound examination of how well leading theories of urban politics explain the observed realities. The specific cases they analyze include a wide mix of transportation and downtown revitalization projects, drawn from numerous regions—most notably Boston, Denver, Los Angeles, New York City, Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas, Portland, and Seattle. While their original research focuses on highway, airport, and rail transit programs and projects, they draw as well on the work of others to analyze the politics of public investment in urban renewal, downtown retailing, convention centers, and professional sports facilities. In comparing their findings with leading theories of urban and American politics, Altshuler and Luberoff arrive at some surprising findings about which perform best and also reveal some important gaps in the literature as a whole. In a concluding chapter, they examine the potential effects of new fiscal pressures, business mobilization to relax environmental constraints, and security concerns in the wake of September 11. And they make clear their own views about how best to achieve a balance between developmental, environmental, and democratic values in public investment decisionmaking. Integrating fifty years of urban development history with leading theories of urban and American politics, MEGA-PROJECTS provides significant new insights into urban and intergovernmental politics.

Whose Urban Renaissance?

An international comparison of urban regeneration strategies

Author: Libby Porter,Kate Shaw

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134106084

Category: Architecture

Page: 320

View: 8723

The desire of governments for a 'renaissance' of their cities is a defining feature of contemporary urban policy. From Melbourne and Toronto to Johannesburg and Istanbul, government policies are successfully attracting investment and middle-class populations to their inner areas. Regeneration - or gentrification as it can often become - produces winners and losers. There is a substantial literature on the causes and unequal effects of gentrification, and on the global and local conditions driving processes of dis- and re-investment. But there is little examination of the actual strategies used to achieve urban regeneration - what were their intents, did they 'succeed' (and if not why not) and what were the specific consequences? Whose Urban Renaissance? asks who benefits from these urban transformations. The book contains beautifully written and accessible stories from researchers and activists in 21 cities across Europe, North and South America, Asia, South Africa, the Middle East and Australia, each exploring a specific case of urban regeneration. Some chapters focus on government or market strategies driving the regeneration process, and look closely at the effects. Others look at the local contingencies that influence the way these strategies work. Still others look at instances of opposition and struggle, and at policy interventions that were used in some places to ameliorate the inequities of gentrification. Working from these stories, the editors develop a comparative analysis of regeneration strategies, with nuanced assessments of local constraints and counteracting policy responses. The concluding chapters provide a critical comparison of existing strategies, and open new directions for more equitable policy approaches in the future. Whose Urban Renaissance? is targeted at students, academics, planners, policy-makers and activists. The book is unique in its geographical breadth and its constructive policy emphasis, offering a succinct, critical and timely exploration of urban regeneration strategies throughout the world.

Cultural Policy

Author: David Bell,Kate Oakley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136473955

Category: Social Science

Page: 176

View: 1693

David Bell and Kate Oakley survey the major debates emerging in cultural policy research, adopting an approach based on spatial scale to explore cultural policy in cities, nations and internationally. They contextualise these discussions with an exploration of what both ‘culture’ and ‘policy’ mean when they are joined together as cultural policy. Drawing on topical examples and contemporary research, as well as their own experience in both academia and in consultancy, Bell and Oakley urge readers to think critically about the project of cultural policy as it is currently being played out around the world. Cultural Policy is a comprehensive and readable book that provides a lively, up-to-date overview of key debates in cultural policy, making it ideal for students of media and cultural studies, creative and cultural industries, and arts management.

Leading the inclusive city

Place-based innovation for a bounded planet

Author: Hambleton, Robin

Publisher: Policy Press

ISBN: 144731185X

Category: Political Science

Page: 416

View: 7946

Cities are often seen as helpless victims in a global flow of events and many view growing inequality in cities as inevitable. This engaging book rejects this gloomy prognosis and argues that imaginative place-based leadership can enable citizens to shape the urban future in accordance with progressive values – advancing social justice, promoting care for the environment and bolstering community empowerment. This international and comparative book, written by an experienced author, shows how inspirational civic leaders are making a major difference in cities across the world. The analysis provides practical lessons for local leaders and a significant contribution to thinking on public service innovation for anyone who wants to change urban society for the better.

The Neoliberal City

Governance, Ideology, and Development in American Urbanism

Author: Jason Hackworth

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801470048

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 6946

The shift in the ideological winds toward a "free-market" economy has brought profound effects in urban areas. The Neoliberal City presents an overview of the effect of these changes on today's cities. The term "neoliberalism" was originally used in reference to a set of practices that first-world institutions like the IMF and World Bank impose on third-world countries and cities. The support of unimpeded trade and individual freedoms and the discouragement of state regulation and social spending are the putative centerpieces of this vision. More and more, though, people have come to recognize that first-world cities are undergoing the same processes. In The Neoliberal City, Jason Hackworth argues that neoliberal policies are in fact having a profound effect on the nature and direction of urbanization in the United States and other wealthy countries, and that much can be learned from studying its effect. He explores the impact that neoliberalism has had on three aspects of urbanization in the United States: governance, urban form, and social movements. The American inner city is seen as a crucial battle zone for the wider neoliberal transition primarily because it embodies neoliberalism's antithesis, Keynesian egalitarian liberalism. Focusing on issues such as gentrification in New York City; public-housing policy in New York, Chicago, and Seattle; downtown redevelopment in Phoenix; and urban-landscape change in New Brunswick, N.J., Hackworth shows us how material and symbolic changes to institutions, neighborhoods, and entire urban regions can be traced in part to the rise of neoliberalism.

Urban Design and the British Urban Renaissance

Author: John Punter

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135263914

Category: Architecture

Page: 392

View: 1130

Are Britain’s cities attractive places in which to live, work and play? Asking that question, this is a critical review of how the design dimension of the Urban Renaissance strategy was developed and applied, based on expert academic assessments of progress in Britain’s thirteen largest cities. The case studies are preceded by a dissection of New Labour’s renaissance agenda, and concluded by a synthesis of achievements and failings. Exploring the implications of this strategy for the future of urban planning and design, this is a must-read for students, practitioners of these subjects and for all those who wish to improve the quality of the British urban environment.

Globalization and Urban Change

Capital, Culture, and Pacific Rim Mega-projects

Author: Kris Olds

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199256969

Category: Social Science

Page: 311

View: 4019

Kris Olds provides a grounded analysis of globalization and urban change in the late twentieth century. Based on field work carried out in Vancouver, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Paris, and London, the author highlights the role of two transnational cultures - ethnic Chinese property developers and 'brand name' arthitects - in the planning and development of urban mega-projects. Case studies from Vancouver and Shanghai are used to analyse the nature of the transnational practices and networks that facilitate the production of new urban spaces on the Pacific Rim. This reflexive, situated, and interdisciplinary account offers an alternative perspective to the abstract and economistic analyses that dominate our understanding of globalization and urban change.

The Global Challenge and Marginalization

Author: Márcio Moraes Valença,E. L. Nel,Walter Leimgruber

Publisher: Nova Science Pub Incorporated

ISBN: 9781600218392

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 462

View: 2164

Marginality is often seen as a reflection of division, in which there is an unequal relationship of economic and political power between two extremes. In this way, it is a common thing to find oppositional couples, like North/South, Rich/Poor, Homogenous/Heterogenous, Centre/Periphery, Inclusion/Exclusion, Developed/Underdeveloped, and New/Old, in much of the literature dealing with marginality. These oppositions come about out of a socially and politically unbalanced society which is organised according to the differentiation of individuals in a hierarchical, exclusionary fashion. In this book there are 25 chapters, written by 36 academics from 27 universities located in 14 countries and in 4 continents on this fascinating subject matter.

La Ciudad Neoliberal

Gentrificación y exclusión en Santiago de Chile, Buenos Aires, Ciudad de México y Madrid

Author: Rodrigo Hidalgo,Michael Janoschka

Publisher: Rodrigo Hidalgo y Michael Janoschka

ISBN: 9561413957

Category:

Page: 280

View: 5108

El presente libro contiene textos de distintos países respecto de las principales dinámicas urbanas y territoriales observadas en las últimas tres décadas como consecuencia de la aplicación y elaboración de políticas y discursos neoliberales. Para ello, la obra recoge los estudios de las ciudades de Santiago de Chile, Buenos Aires, Ciudad de México y Madrid y, en ellas, reconoce y explica la reestructuración política, territorial y económica acaecida. En este sentido, la obra constituye un aporte imprescindible para la comprensión y reflexión política del desarrollo urbano acontecido en estas cuatro ciudades durante las últimas décadas y permite, por tanto, la construcción de una crítica fundada de los principales efectos territoriales de la ideología neoliberal.