Author, Reader, Book

Medieval Authorship in Theory and Practice

Author: Stephen Partridge,Erik Kwakkel

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 0802099343

Category: History

Page: 305

View: 3052

Incorporating several kinds of scholarship on medieval authorship, the essays examine interrelated questions raised by the relationship between an author and a reader, the relationships between authors and their antecedents, and the ways in which authorship interacts with the physical presentation of texts in books.

Tristia

Author: Ovid

Publisher: Loeb Classical Library

ISBN: N.A

Category: Poetry

Page: 511

View: 5742

Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso, 43 BCE-17 CE), born at Sulmo, studied rhetoric and law at Rome. Later he did considerable public service there, and otherwise devoted himself to poetry and to society. Famous at first, he offended the emperor Augustus by his Ars Amatoria, and was banished because of this work and some other reason unknown to us, and dwelt in the cold and primitive town of Tomis on the Black Sea. He continued writing poetry, a kindly man, leading a temperate life. He died in exile. Ovid's main surviving works are the Metamorphoses, a source of inspiration to artists and poets including Chaucer and Shakespeare; the Fasti, a poetic treatment of the Roman year of which Ovid finished only half; the Amores, love poems; the Ars Amatoria, not moral but clever and in parts beautiful; Heroides, fictitious love letters by legendary women to absent husbands; and the dismal works written in exile: the Tristia, appeals to persons including his wife and also the emperor; and similar Epistulae ex Ponto. Poetry came naturally to Ovid, who at his best is lively, graphic and lucid. The Loeb Classical Library edition of Ovid is in six volumes.

Russia's Rome

Imperial Visions, Messianic Dreams, 1890–1940

Author: Judith E. Kalb

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 0299229238

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 320

View: 7977

A wide-ranging study of empire, religious prophecy, and nationalism in literature, Russia’s Rome: Imperial Visions, Messianic Dreams, 1890–1940 provides the first examination of Russia’s self-identification with Rome during a period that encompassed the revolutions of 1905 and 1917 and the rise of the Soviet state. Analyzing Rome-related texts by six writers—Dmitrii Merezhkovskii, Valerii Briusov, Aleksandr Blok, Viacheslav Ivanov, Mikhail Kuzmin, and Mikhail Bulgakov—Judith E. Kalb argues that the myth of Russia as the “Third Rome” was resurrected to create a Rome-based discourse of Russian national identity that endured even as the empire of the tsars declined and fell and a new state replaced it. Russia generally finds itself beyond the purview of studies concerned with the ongoing potency of the classical world in modern society. Slavists, for their part, have only recently begun to note the influence of classical civilization not only during Russia’s neo-classical eighteenth century but also during its modernist period. With its interdisciplinary scope, Russia’s Rome fills a gap in both Russian studies and scholarship on the classical tradition, providing valuable material for scholars of Russian culture and history, classicists, and readers interested in the classical heritage.

Second Corinthians and Paul's Gospel of Human Mortality

How Paul's Experience of Death Authorizes His Apostolic Authority in Corinth

Author: Richard I. Deibert

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 9783161533778

Category: Religion

Page: 293

View: 3894

In this close reading of Second Corinthians and examination of prevailing attitudes toward death in Greco-Roman Corinth, Richard I. Deibert proposes Paul's physical mortality as the window through which to understand both the mystery of his collapsing authority in Corinth and the heart of his gospel. In his own experience of physical dying, Paul experiences the "deadness" of the resurrected Jesus, which paradoxically communicates life to him and through him to his congregations. Paul discovers that death has been transfigured into a source of life and, consequently, that human mortality has been infused with saving power. This study of human mortality clarifies, both for Paul's day and for our own, how crucial it is to guard the human person as an inseparable unity of body and soul, and to keep theology grounded in experience. Richard I. Deibert's work is of vital interest not only to students of early Christian and New Testament history, but also to students of anthropology, philosophy, and theology.

Ovid in Six Volumes: Tristia. Ex Ponto

Author: Ovid,G. P. Goold

Publisher: Loeb Classical Library

ISBN: 9780674991675

Category: Poetry

Page: 510

View: 6247

Ovid's main surviving works are the 'Metamorphoses', a source of inspiration to artists and poets including Chaucer and Shakespeare; the Fasti, a poetic treatment of the Roman year of which Ovid finished only half; the 'Amores', love poems; the 'Ars amato

Lucretius as Theorist of Political Life

Author: J. Colman

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137292326

Category: Political Science

Page: 173

View: 4883

Lucretius as Theorist of Political Life is an interpretation of Lucretius' poem On the Nature of Things as a defense of philosophy given the irremediable tension between the competing claims of the philosophic and political life. The central issue is the need for, and attempt by, philosophy to justify and defend its way of life to the political community. This work uncovers how Lucretius' conception of the philosophic life, and the reaction to the human, religious, and political implications of the discovery of nature, distinguish his intention from the anti-theological animus that drives the politically and scientifically ambitious project of his modern appropriators.

Matrona Docta

Educated Women in the Roman Elite from Cornelia to Julia Domna

Author: Emily A. Hemelrijk

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134642857

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 1732

Matrona Docta presents a unique study of the education of upper-class women in Roman society in the central period of Roman history, from the second century BC to AD 235. Emily A. Hemelrijk reconstructs women's opportunities to acquire an education, the impediments they faced, the level of education they could reach and the judgement on educated women in Roman society. She examines also the role of women as patronesses of literature, learning and Roman women's writing.

Ovid

Author: Publius Ovidius Naso,Ovid,Grant Showerman,G. P. Goold,Frank Justus Miller,Sir James George Frazer, Sir, Sir

Publisher: Loeb Classical Library

ISBN: 9780674991675

Category: Poetry

Page: 511

View: 7975

In the melancholy elegies of the Tristia and the Ex Ponto, Ovid (43 BCE–17 CE) writes as from exile in Tomis on the Black sea, appealing to such people as his wife and the emperor.

Heroides ; and, Amores

Author: Ovid

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780674990456

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 534

View: 5156

Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso, 43 BCE-17 CE), born at Sulmo, studied rhetoric and law at Rome. Later he did considerable public service there, and otherwise devoted himself to poetry and to society. Famous at first, he offended the emperor Augustus by his "Ars Amatoria, " and was banished because of this work and some other reason unknown to us, and dwelt in the cold and primitive town of Tomis on the Black Sea. He continued writing poetry, a kindly man, leading a temperate life. He died in exile. Ovid's main surviving works are the "Metamorphoses, " a source of inspiration to artists and poets including Chaucer and Shakespeare; the "Fasti, " a poetic treatment of the Roman year of which Ovid finished only half; the "Amores, " love poems; the "Ars Amatoria, " not moral but clever and in parts beautiful; "Heroides, " fictitious love letters by legendary women to absent husbands; and the dismal works written in exile: the "Tristia, " appeals to persons including his wife and also the emperor; and similar "Epistulae ex Ponto." Poetry came naturally to Ovid, who at his best is lively, graphic and lucid. The Loeb Classical Library edition of Ovid is in six volumes.

Die Frau aus Andros

Author: Thornton Wilder

Publisher: S. Fischer Verlag

ISBN: 3104034532

Category: Fiction

Page: 120

View: 6751

Thornton Wilders Roman ›Die Frau aus Andros‹ erzählt von einer beeindruckenden Frau in der Spätzeit der griechischen Antike Eingebunden in Hinweise auf das »Land, das bald das Heilige genannt werden sollte«, spielt dieser Roman Thornton Wilders in der Spätzeit der griechischen Antike. Chrysis, die Nichtgriechin von der Kykladeninsel Andros, hat zur Zeit um Christi Geburt auf der ägäischen Insel Brynos zum Ärger der auf Handel eingeschworenen Bewohner den alten Brauch des Hetärenmahls mit Rezitation, Musik und Diskussion über philosophische Probleme wiederaufgenommen. Von den wohlhabenden Bürgern verachtet, versammeln sie und ihre Schwester Glykerion die sozial Schwachen, aber auch, sehr zum Leid ihrer Eltern, die jungen Männer. »Mit diesem Werk erreichte Wilder einen vorläufigen Höhepunkt seiner künstlerischen Entwicklung.« Hermann Stresau

Lvciani

Vitarvm Avctio Piscator

Author: - Lucianus (Samosatensis,NULL)

Publisher: Vieweg+Teubner Verlag

ISBN: 9783519015154

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 74

View: 6717


Rhetorik

Author: Aristoteles,Heinrich Knebel

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 207

View: 551


Metamorphoses

Author: Publius Ovidius Naso

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783423091800

Category:

Page: 166

View: 2680

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