Tomatoland

How Modern Industrial Agriculture Destroyed Our Most Alluring Fruit

Author: Barry Estabrook

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

ISBN: 1449408419

Category: Cooking

Page: 240

View: 3620

2012 IACP Award Winner in the Food Matters category Supermarket produce sections bulging with a year-round supply of perfectly round, bright red-orange tomatoes have become all but a national birthright. But in Tomatoland, which is based on his James Beard Award-winning article, "The Price of Tomatoes," investigative food journalist Barry Estabrook reveals the huge human and environmental cost of the $5 billion fresh tomato industry. Fields are sprayed with more than one hundred different herbicides and pesticides. Tomatoes are picked hard and green and artificially gassed until their skins acquire a marketable hue. Modern plant breeding has tripled yields, but has also produced fruits with dramatically reduced amounts of calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin C, and tomatoes that have fourteen times more sodium than the tomatoes our parents enjoyed. The relentless drive for low costs has fostered a thriving modern-day slave trade in the United States. How have we come to this point? Estabrook traces the supermarket tomato from its birthplace in the deserts of Peru to the impoverished town of Immokalee, Florida, a.k.a. the tomato capital of the United States. He visits the laboratories of seedsmen trying to develop varieties that can withstand the rigors of agribusiness and still taste like a garden tomato, and then moves on to commercial growers who operate on tens of thousands of acres, and eventually to a hillside field in Pennsylvania, where he meets an obsessed farmer who produces delectable tomatoes for the nation's top restaurants. Throughout Tomatoland, Estabrook presents a who's who cast of characters in the tomato industry: the avuncular octogenarian whose conglomerate grows one out of every eight tomatoes eaten in the United States; the ex-Marine who heads the group that dictates the size, color, and shape of every tomato shipped out of Florida; the U.S. attorney who has doggedly prosecuted human traffickers for the past decade; and the Guatemalan peasant who came north to earn money for his parents' medical bills and found himself enslaved for two years. Tomatoland reads like a suspenseful whodunit as well as an expose of today's agribusiness systems and the price we pay as a society when we take taste and thought out of our food purchases.

Tomatoland

How Modern Industrial Agriculture Destroyed Our Most Alluring Fruit

Author: Barry Estabrook

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

ISBN: 1449423450

Category: Cooking

Page: 256

View: 4393

Investigative food journalist Barry Estabrook reveals the huge human and environmental cost of the five billion dollar fresh tomato industry and the price we pay as a society when we take taste and thought out of our food purchases.

Tomatoland

How Modern Industrial Agriculture Destroyed Our Most Alluring Fruit

Author: Barry Estabrook

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

ISBN: 9781449401092

Category: Cooking

Page: 240

View: 9646

Based on a James Beard award-winning article from a leading voice on the politics of agribusiness, Tomatoland combines history, legend, passion for taste, and investigative reporting on modern agribusiness and environmental issues into a revealing, controversial look at the tomato, the fruit we love so much that we eat $4 billion-worth annually. 2012 IACP Award Winner in the Food Matters category Supermarket produce sections bulging with a year-round supply of perfectly round, bright red-orange tomatoes have become all but a national birthright. But in Tomatoland, which is based on his James Beard Award-winning article, "The Price of Tomatoes," investigative food journalist Barry Estabrook reveals the huge human and environmental cost of the $5 billion fresh tomato industry. Fields are sprayed with more than one hundred different herbicides and pesticides. Tomatoes are picked hard and green and artificially gassed until their skins acquire a marketable hue. Modern plant breeding has tripled yields, but has also produced fruits with dramatically reduced amounts of calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin C, and tomatoes that have fourteen times more sodium than the tomatoes our parents enjoyed. The relentless drive for low costs has fostered a thriving modern-day slave trade in the United States. How have we come to this point? Estabrook traces the supermarket tomato from its birthplace in the deserts of Peru to the impoverished town of Immokalee, Florida, a.k.a. the tomato capital of the United States. He visits the laboratories of seedsmen trying to develop varieties that can withstand the rigors of agribusiness and still taste like a garden tomato, and then moves on to commercial growers who operate on tens of thousands of acres, and eventually to a hillside field in Pennsylvania, where he meets an obsessed farmer who produces delectable tomatoes for the nation's top restaurants. Throughout Tomatoland, Estabrook presents a who's who cast of characters in the tomato industry: the avuncular octogenarian whose conglomerate grows one out of every eight tomatoes eaten in the United States; the ex-Marine who heads the group that dictates the size, color, and shape of every tomato shipped out of Florida; the U.S. attorney who has doggedly prosecuted human traffickers for the past decade; and the Guatemalan peasant who came north to earn money for his parents' medical bills and found himself enslaved for two years. Tomatoland reads like a suspenseful whodunit as well as an expose of today's agribusiness systems and the price we pay as a society when we take taste and thought out of our food purchases.

Pig Tales: An Omnivores Quest for Sustainable Meat

Author: Barry Estabrook

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393248038

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 9035

“Illuminating, a window into the world of pigs and pig farmers that every American omnivore needs to read.” —Ruth Reichl, author of Delicious! Barry Estabrook, author of the New York Times bestseller Tomatoland and a writer of “great skill and compassion” (Eric Schlosser), now explores the dark side of the American pork industry. Drawing on his personal experiences raising pigs as well as his sharp investigative instincts, Estabrook covers the range of the human-porcine experience. He embarks on nocturnal feral pig hunts in Texas. He visits farmers who raise animals in vast confinement barns for Smithfield and Tyson, two of the country’s biggest pork producers. And he describes the threat of infectious disease and the possible contamination of our food supply. Through these stories shines Estabrook’s abiding love for these remarkable creatures. Pigs are social, self-aware, and playful, not to mention smart enough to master the typical house dog commands of “sit, stay, come” twice as fast as your average pooch. With the cognitive abilities of at least three-year-olds, they can even learn to operate a modified computer. Unfortunately for the pigs, they’re also delicious to eat. Estabrook shows how these creatures are all too often subjected to lives of suffering in confinement and squalor, sustained on a drug-laced diet just long enough to reach slaughter weight, then killed on mechanized disassembly lines. But it doesn’t have to be this way. Pig Tales presents a lively portrait of those farmers who are taking an alternative approach, like one Danish producer that has a far more eco-friendly and humane system of pork production, and new, small family farms with free-range heritage pigs raised on antibiotic-free diets. It is possible to raise pigs responsibly and respectfully in a way that is good for producers, consumers, and some of the top chefs in America. Provocative, witty, and deeply informed, Pig Tales is bound to spark conversation at dinner tables across America.

Banana

The Fate of the Fruit that Changed the World

Author: Dan Koeppel

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781594630385

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 281

View: 3928

From its early beginnings in Southeast Asia, to the machinations of the United Fruit Company in Costa Rica and Central America, the banana's history and its fate as a victim of fungus are explored.

Fed Up

The High Costs of Cheap Food

Author: Dale Finley Slongwhite

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813049847

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 2922

This book provides an intimate look at the lives of former African-American farmworkers who labored in central Florida's farms along the shores of Lake Apopka. The author familiarizes readers with the history of Lake Apopka and the social and environmental injustice centered on food production that has taken place there.

Sustainable Food

How to Buy Right and Spend Less

Author: Elise McDonough

Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing

ISBN: 1603582487

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 96

View: 898

Wondering whether it’s worth it to splurge on the locally raised beef? What about those organic carrots? New in the Chelsea Green Guides series, Sustainable Food: How to Buy Right and Spend Less helps the average shopper navigate the choices, whether strolling the aisles of a modern supermarket or foraging at a local farmers market. This down-to-earth, casual guide—small enough to be slipped into your pocket—answers these and other questions for the shopper: What are the differences among organic, local, fair-trade, free-range, naturally raised, and biodynamic foods? How affordable is it to subscribe to a CSA farm—and what are the advantages? Is it better to choose wild Alaskan salmon at $18.99, or the Chilean farmed fish at $11.99? What cooking oils can be sustainably sourced? How can a food co-op increase access to, and affordability of, healthier, Earth-friendly foods? Where can you find sustainably produced sugar, and are there any local replacements for sweeteners from faraway lands? What do the distinctions between shade-grown and trellised coffee mean? Is shark okay to eat? How about mackerel? Why is the war on plastic bags so important? Sustainable eating just got easier.

Fair Food

Growing a Healthy, Sustainable Food System for All

Author: Oran B. Hesterman

Publisher: PublicAffairs

ISBN: 1610392043

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 4926

Our food system is broken, and it's endangering what's most precious to us: our environment, our health, our soil and water, and our future. In recent years, a host of books and films have compellingly documented the dangers. But advice on what to do about them largely begins and ends with the admonition to “eat local” or “eat organic.” Longtime good food pioneer Oran Hesterman knows that we can't fix the broken system simply by changing what's on our own plates: the answer lies beyond the kitchen. In Fair Food he shares an inspiring and practical vision for changing not only what we eat, but how food is grown, packaged, delivered, marketed, and sold. He introduces people and organizations across the country who are already doing this work in a number of creative ways, and provides a wealth of practical information for readers who want to get more involved.

Eight Hours for What We Will

Workers and Leisure in an Industrial City, 1870-1920

Author: Roy Rosenzweig

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521313971

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 3831

Focusing on the city of Worcester, Massachusetts the author takes the reader to the saloons, the amusement parks, and the movie houses where American industrial workers spent their leisure hours, to explore the nature of working-class culture and class relations during this era.

Food

Author: Jennifer Clapp

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1509500839

Category: Science

Page: 256

View: 8668

We all need food to survive, and forty percent of the worldï¿1⁄2s population relies on agriculture for their livelihood. Yet control over food is concentrated in relatively few hands. Turmoil in the world food economy over the past decade - including the food price crisis, intensification of land grabs, and clashes over rules governing global food trade - has highlighted both the volatility and vulnerability inherent in the way we currently organize this vital sector. At the same time, contrasting extremes of both undernourishment and overnourishment affect a significant proportion of humanity. There is also growing awareness of the serious ecological consequences that stem from industrial models of agriculture that are increasingly spreading worldwide. The revised and updated second edition of this popular book aims to contribute to a fuller understanding of the forces that influence and shape the current global food system. In it, Jennifer Clapp explores how the rise of industrial agriculture, corporate control, inequitable agricultural trade rules, and the financialization of food have each enabled powerful actors to gain fundamental influence on the practices that dominate the world food economy. A variety of movements have emerged that are making important progress in establishing alternative food systems but, as Clappï¿1⁄2s penetrating analysis ably shows, significant challenges remain.

Tomato

Author: Gail Harland,Sofia Larrinua Craxton

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780756657208

Category: Gardening

Page: 192

View: 936

Everything you ever wanted to know about tomatoes Whether you have a penchant for Principe Borghese or yearn for a Yellow Butterfly, this is the true tomato lover's faithful companion. Delve into this little book, and you will find all the information you need on growing tomatoes. Discover the most reliable varieties, the highest yielding bushes, and those with the most intriguing shapes and colours. Find detailed advice on every aspect of growing tomatoes outdoors, under glass, and in the ground, in growbags, pots and even hanging baskets. Symptom charts will help you identify pests and diseases before they have a chance to destroy your tomato crop. And when you are ready to harvest, there are 35 recipes that let your lovingly nurtured tomatoes take centre stage, plus ideas for preserving them in ketchups, chutneys and relishes and notes on freezing and drying.

The Food Explorer

The True Adventures of the Globe-Trotting Botanist Who Transformed What America Eats

Author: Daniel Stone

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101990589

Category: Botanists

Page: 416

View: 750

David Fairchild, a young botanist with an insatiable lust to explore and experience the world, set out in search of foods that would enrich the American farmer and enchant the American eater. Fairchild's finds weren't just limited to food: From Egypt he sent back a variety of cotton that revolutionised an industry, and via Japan he introduced the cherry blossom tree, forever brightening America's capital. Along the way, he was arrested, caught diseases, and bargained with island tribes. Through him, America transformed into the most diverse food system ever created.

Class Matters

Author: The New York Times

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9781429956697

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 7668

The acclaimed New York Times series on social class in America—and its implications for the way we live our lives We Americans have long thought of ourselves as unburdened by class distinctions. We have no hereditary aristocracy or landed gentry, and even the poorest among us feel that they can become rich through education, hard work, or sheer gumption. And yet social class remains a powerful force in American life. In Class Matters, a team of New York Times reporters explores the ways in which class—defined as a combination of income, education, wealth, and occupation—influences destiny in a society that likes to think of itself as a land of opportunity. We meet individuals in Kentucky and Chicago who have used education to lift themselves out of poverty and others in Virginia and Washington whose lack of education holds them back. We meet an upper-middle-class family in Georgia who moves to a different town every few years, and the newly rich in Nantucket whose mega-mansions have driven out the longstanding residents. And we see how class disparities manifest themselves at the doctor's office and at the marriage altar. For anyone concerned about the future of the American dream, Class Matters is truly essential reading. "Class Matters is a beautifully reported, deeply disturbing, portrait of a society bent out of shape by harsh inequalities. Read it and see how you fit into the problem or—better yet—the solution!"—Barbara Ehrenreich, author of Nickel and Dimed and Bait and Switch

Mrs. Wheelbarrow's Practical Pantry: Recipes and Techniques for Year-Round Preserving

Author: Cathy Barrow

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393245861

Category: Cooking

Page: 432

View: 308

2015 IACP Award Winner A householder's guide to canning through the seasons. In Mrs. Wheelbarrow's Practical Pantry, food preserving expert Cathy Barrow presents a beautiful collection of essential preserving techniques for turning the fleeting abundance of the farmers’ market into a well-stocked pantry full of canned fruits and vegetables, jams, stocks, soups, and more. As Cathy writes in her introduction, “A walk through the weekend farmers’ market is a chance not only to shop for the week ahead but also to plan for the winter months.” From the strawberries and blueberries of late spring to the peaches, tomatoes, and butter beans of early fall, Mrs. Wheelbarrow’s Practical Pantry shows you how to create a fresh, delectable, and lasting pantry—a grocery store in your own home. Beyond the core techniques of water-bath canning, advanced techniques for pressure canning, salt-curing meats and fish, smoking, and even air-curing pancetta are broken down into easy-to-digest, confidence-building instructions. Under Cathy’s affable direction, you’ll discover that homemade cream cheese and Camembert are within the grasp of the weekday cook—and the same goes for smoked salmon, home canned black beans, and preserved and cured duck confit. In addition to canning techniques, Practical Pantry includes 36 bonus recipes using what’s been preserved: rugelach filled with apricot preserves, tomato soup from canned crushed tomatoes, arugula and bresaola salad with Parmigiano-Reggiano and hazelnuts, brined pork chops with garlicky bok choy. Tips for choosing the best produce at the right time of season and finding the right equipment for your canning and cooking needs—along with troubleshooting tips to ensure safe preserving—will keep your kitchen vibrant from spring to fall. Whether your food comes by the crate, the bushel, or the canvas bag, just a few of Cathy’s recipes are enough to furnish your own practical pantry, one that will provide nourishment and delight all year round. Canning and preserving is not just about the convenience of a pantry filled with peaches, dill pickles, and currant jelly, nor is it the simple joy of making a meal from the jars on the shelf—creating a practical pantry is about cultivating a thoughtful connection with your local community, about knowing exactly where your food comes from and what it can become.

Ripe

The Search for the Perfect Tomato

Author: Arthur Allen

Publisher: Counterpoint LLC

ISBN: 9781582437125

Category: Cooking

Page: 291

View: 7136

Describes the history of tomatoes, their importance to cultures around the world, the plight of migrant laborers, and the journey of a typical tomato from field to table.

The Sushi Economy

Globalization and the Making of a Modern Delicacy

Author: Sasha Issenberg

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101216883

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 352

View: 9015

The highly acclaimed exploration of sushi’s surprising history, global business, and international allure One generation ago, sushi’s narrow reach ensured that sports fishermen who caught tuna in most of parts of the world sold the meat for pennies as cat food. Today, the fatty cuts of tuna known as toro are among the planet’s most coveted luxury foods, worth hundreds of dollars a pound and capable of losing value more quickly than any other product on earth. So how did one of the world’s most popular foods go from being practically unknown in the United States to being served in towns all across America, and in such a short span of time? A riveting combination of culinary biography, behind-the- scenes restaurant detail, and a unique exploration of globalization’s dynamics, the book traces sushi’s journey from Japanese street snack to global delicacy. After traversing the pages of The Sushi Economy, you’ll never see the food on your plate—or the world around you—quite the same way again.

Food and the City

Urban Agriculture and the New Food Revolution

Author: Jennifer Cockrall-King

Publisher: Prometheus Books

ISBN: 1616144599

Category: Social Science

Page: 372

View: 5759

A global movement to take back our food is growing. The future of farming is in our hands—and in our cities. This book examines alternative food systems in cities around the globe that are shortening their food chains, growing food within their city limits, and taking their "food security" into their own hands. The author, an award-winning food journalist, sought out leaders in the urban-agriculture movement and visited cities successfully dealing with "food deserts." What she found was not just a niche concern of activists but a global movement that cuts across the private and public spheres, economic classes, and cultures. She describes a global movement happening from London and Paris to Vancouver and New York to establish alternatives to the monolithic globally integrated supermarket model. A cadre of forward-looking, innovative people has created growing spaces in cities: on rooftops, backyards, vacant lots, along roadways, and even in "vertical farms." Whether it’s a community public orchard supplying the needs of local residents or an urban farm that has reclaimed a derelict inner city lot to grow and sell premium market veggies to restaurant chefs, the urban food revolution is clearly underway and working. This book is an exciting, fascinating chronicle of a game-changing movement, a rebellion against the industrial food behemoth, and a reclaiming of communities to grow, distribute, and eat locally. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Food, Farming, and Sustainability

Readings in Agricultural Law

Author: Susan A. Schneider

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781611636390

Category:

Page: 776

View: 2718

Food, Farming, and Sustainability provides a survey of the unique network of laws that apply to agriculture, framed in the context of society¿s need for a sustainable, resilient food supply. Traditionally, agriculture has been favored in the law with exemptions, exceptions, and special rules that reflect the unique character of agricultural production. This book examines this special treatment, exploring its origin and its impact. The new edition provides updates to each of the prior chapters, incorporates new census data on agriculture in the U.S., explores the 2014 Farm Bill, and examines new developments in agricultural biotechnology law. It is an expanded edition that includes a new chapter on food safety and agricultural production and incorporates new readings on climate change and agriculture. The book continues its theme of providing a mix of readings in law and policy, using current events to highlight the challenges facing society in balancing social, political, economic, and environmental concerns. From its initial discussion of ''agricultural exceptionalism'' and industrial scale production to its concluding remarks on the future of our food system, this book is certain to provoke thoughtful discussion.

Foodopoly

The Battle Over the Future of Food and Farming in America

Author: Wenonah Hauter

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 159558790X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 355

View: 3838

Argues that lobbyists and the consolidation and corporate control of food production is to blame for the unhealthy and unfair agricultural policies of the United States.

Food Fight

The Citizen's Guide to the Next Food and Farm Bill

Author: Daniel Imhoff

Publisher: Waterside Publishing

ISBN: 0970950071

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 215

View: 1083

Discusses the Farm Bill; explores the connection to obesity; and offers twenty-five ideas, including aligning the bill with dietary guidelines, affordable healthy foods for everyone, and new farmer programs.