"They Take Our Jobs!"

And 20 Other Myths about Immigration

Author: Aviva Chomsky

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807057169

Category: LAW

Page: 272

View: 2229

Revised edition of the author's "They take our jobs!," c2007.

"They Take Our Jobs!"

And 20 Other Myths about Immigration

Author: Aviva Chomsky

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 9780807041567

Category: Social Science

Page: 236

View: 6502

Debunks a variety of myths surrounding the subject of immigration and immigrants in the United States, covering the economy, the law, race, and government policies.

"They Take Our Jobs!"

and 20 Other Myths about Immigration, revised edition

Author: Aviva Chomsky

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807057177

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 946

Revised and expanded edition of the groundbreaking book which demystifies twenty-one of the most widespread myths and beliefs about immigrants and immigrations. Aviva Chomsky dismantles twenty-one of the most widespread and pernicious myths and beliefs about immigrants and immigration in this incisive book. "They Take Our Jobs!" challenges the underlying assumptions that fuel misinformed claims about immigrants, radically altering our notions of citizenship, discrimination, and US history. With fresh material including a new introduction, revised timeline, and updated terminology section, this expanded edition is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand how these myths are used to promote aggressive anti-immigrant policies.

Undocumented

How Immigration Became Illegal

Author: Aviva Chomsky

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807001686

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 7580

Explores what it means to be undocumented in a legal, social, economic and historical context In this illuminating work, immigrant rights activist Aviva Chomsky shows how “illegality” and “undocumentedness” are concepts that were created to exclude and exploit. With a focus on US policy, she probes how people, especially Mexican and Central Americans, have been assigned this status—and to what ends. Blending history with human drama, Chomsky explores what it means to be undocumented in a legal, social, economic, and historical context. The result is a powerful testament of the complex, contradictory, and ever-shifting nature of status in America. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Immigrant, Inc.

Why Immigrant Entrepreneurs Are Driving the New Economy (and how they will save the American worker)

Author: Richard T. Herman,Robert L. Smith

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780470570302

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 256

View: 3694

A provocative look at the remarkable contributions of high-skill immigrant entrepreneurs in America Both a revelation and a call-to-action, Immigrant, Inc. explores the uncommon skill and drive of America's new immigrants and their knack for innovation and entrepreneurship. From the techies who created icons of the new economy-Intel, Google, eBay and Sun Microsystems-to the young engineers tinkering with solar power and next-generation car batteries, immigrants have proven themselves to be America's competitive advantage. With a focus on legal immigrants and their odyssey from homeland to start-up, this unique book Explores the psyche, cultural nuances, skills, and business strategies that help immigrants achieve remarkable success Explains how immigrants will create the American jobs of the future-if we let them Whether you are a CEO, a civic leader, or an entrepreneur yourself, Immigrant, Inc. warns of the peril of anti-immigrant attitudes and a hostile immigration process. It also explains how any American can tap their "inner immigrant" to transform their lives and their companies. Written by an immigration lawyer who represents immigrant entrepreneurs and a journalist who specializes in international culture, the authors have a front-row seat to this phenomenon, offering a fascinating glimpse into the mindset of the most persistent entrepreneurs of the era.

They Take Our Jobs!

And 20 Other Myths about Immigration

Author: Aviva Chomsky

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807041572

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 4790

Claims that immigrants take Americans' jobs, are a drain on the American economy, contribute to poverty and inequality, destroy the social fabric, challenge American identity, and contribute to a host of social ills by their very existence are openly discussed and debated at all levels of society. Chomsky dismantles twenty of the most common assumptions and beliefs underlying statements like "I'm not against immigration, only illegal immigration" and challenges the misinformation in clear, straightforward prose. In exposing the myths that underlie today's debate, Chomsky illustrates how the parameters and presumptions of the debate distort how we think—and have been thinking—about immigration. She observes that race, ethnicity, and gender were historically used as reasons to exclude portions of the population from access to rights. Today, Chomsky argues, the dividing line is citizenship. Although resentment against immigrants and attempts to further marginalize them are still apparent today, the notion that non-citizens, too, are created equal is virtually absent from the public sphere. Engaging and fresh, this book will challenge common assumptions about immigrants, immigration, and U.S. history. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Targeted

Homeland Security and the Business of Immigration

Author: Deepa Fernandes

Publisher: Seven Stories Press

ISBN: 158322954X

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 5990

America has always portrayed itself as a country of immigrants, welcoming each year the millions seeking a new home or refuge in this land of plenty. Increasingly, instead of finding their dream, many encounter a nightmare—a country whose culture and legal system aggressively target and prosecute them. In Targeted, journalist Deepa Fernandes seamlessly weaves together history, political analysis, and first-person narratives of those caught in the grips of the increasingly Kafkaesque U.S. Homeland Security system. She documents how in post-9/11 America immigrants have come to be deemed a national security threat. Fernandes—herself an immigrant well-acquainted with U.S. immigration procedures—takes the reader on a harrowing journey inside the new American immigrant experience, a journey marked by militarized border zones, racist profiling, criminalization, detention and deportation. She argues that since 9/11, the Bush administration has been carrying out a series of systematic changes to decades-old immigration policy that constitute a roll back of immigrant rights and a boon for businesses who are helping to enforce the crackdown on immigrants, creating a growing "Immigration Industrial Complex." She also documents the bullet-to-ballot strategy of white supremacist elements that influence our new immigration legislation.

"They're Bankrupting Us!"

And 20 Other Myths about Unions

Author: Bill Fletcher, Jr.

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807003336

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 8640

From Wisconsin to Washington, DC, the claims are made: unions are responsible for budget deficits, and their members are overpaid and enjoy cushy benefits. The only way to save the American economy, pundits claim, is to weaken the labor movement, strip workers of collective bargaining rights, and champion private industry. In "They're Bankrupting Us!": And 20 Other Myths about Unions, labor leader Bill Fletcher Jr. makes sense of this debate as he unpacks the twenty-one myths most often cited by anti-union propagandists. Drawing on his experiences as a longtime labor activist and organizer, Fletcher traces the historical roots of these myths and provides an honest assessment of the missteps of the labor movement. He reveals many of labor's significant contributions, such as establishing the forty-hour work week and minimum wage, guaranteeing safe workplaces, and fighting for equity within the workforce. This timely, accessible, "warts and all" book argues, ultimately, that unions are necessary for democracy and ensure economic and social justice for all people.

Immigration Nation

Raids, Detentions, and Deportations in Post-9/11 America

Author: Tanya Maria Golash-Boza

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317257820

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 8787

In the wake of September 11, 2001, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was created to prevent terrorist attacks in the US.This led to dramatic increases in immigration law enforcement - raids, detentions and deportations have increased six-fold. Immigration Nation critically analyses the human rights impact of this tightening of US immigration policy. Golash-Boza reveals that it has had consequences not just for immigrants, but for citizens, families and communities. She shows that even though family reunification is officially a core component of US immigration policy, it has often torn families apart. This is a critical and revealing look at the real life - frequently devastating - impact of immigration policy in a security conscious world.

"All the Real Indians Died Off"

And 20 Other Myths about Native Americans

Author: Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz,Dina Gilio-Whitaker

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807062650

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 8033

Scholars and activists Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Dina Gilio-Whitaker tackle a wide range of myths about Native American culture and history. Tracing how these ideas evolved, the authors disrupt long-held and enduring myths such as: "Thanksgiving Proves the Indians Welcomed Pilgrims", "Indians Were Savage and Warlike", "Europeans Brought Civilization to Backward Indians", "Sports Mascots Honor Native Americans", "Most Indians Are on Government Welfare", "Indian Casinos Make Them All Rich", and "Indians Are Naturally Predisposed to Alcohol. Each chapter shows how these myths are rooted in the fears and prejudice of European settlers and in the larger political agendas of a settler state aimed at acquiring Indigenous land.

Home Bound

Filipino American Lives across Cultures, Communities, and Countries

Author: Yen Le Espiritu

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520929265

Category: Social Science

Page: 282

View: 2801

Filipino Americans, who experience life in the United States as immigrants, colonized nationals, and racial minorities, have been little studied, though they are one of our largest immigrant groups. Based on her in-depth interviews with more than one hundred Filipinos in San Diego, California, Yen Le Espiritu investigates how Filipino women and men are transformed through the experience of migration, and how they in turn remake the social world around them. Her sensitive analysis reveals that Filipino Americans confront U.S. domestic racism and global power structures by living transnational lives that are shaped as much by literal and symbolic ties to the Philippines as they are by social, economic, and political realities in the United States. Espiritu deftly weaves vivid first-person narratives with larger social and historical contexts as she discovers the meaning of home, community, gender, and intergenerational relations among Filipinos. Among other topics, she explores the ways that female sexuality is defined in contradistinction to American mores and shows how this process becomes a way of opposing racial subjugation in this country. She also examines how Filipinos have integrated themselves into the American workplace and looks closely at the effects of colonialism.

Whitewashed Adobe

The Rise of Los Angeles and the Remaking of Its Mexican Past

Author: William Deverell

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520246675

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 9521

An absorbing narrative supported by a number of previously unpublished period photographs shows how a city that was once part of Mexico itself came of age through appropriating the region's connections to Mexican places and people. Reprint.

The Sexuality of Migration

Border Crossings and Mexican Immigrant Men

Author: Lionel Cantu,Nancy A. Naples,Salvador Vidal-Ortiz

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814758495

Category: Social Science

Page: 245

View: 727

Winner of the 2010 Distinguished Book Award from the American Sociological Association, Sociology of Sexualities Section Winner of the 2010 Distinguished Book Award in Latino Studies Honorable Mention from the Latin American Studies Association The Sexuality of Migration provides an innovative study of the experiences of Mexican men who have same sex with men and who have migrated to the United States. Until recently, immigration scholars have left out the experiences of gays and lesbians. In fact, the topic of sexuality has only recently been addressed in the literature on immigration. The Sexuality of Migration makes significant connections among sexuality, state institutions, and global economic relations. Cantú; situates his analysis within the history of Mexican immigration and offers a broad understanding of diverse migratory experiences ranging from recent gay asylum seekers to an assessment of gay tourism in Mexico. Cantú uses a variety of methods including archival research, interviews, and ethnographic research to explore the range of experiences of Mexican men who have sex with men and the political economy of sexuality and immigration. His primary research site is the greater Los Angeles area, where he interviewed many immigrant men and participated in organizations and community activities alongside his informants. Sure to fill gaps in the field, The Sexuality of Migration simultaneously complicates a fixed notion of sexual identity and explores the complex factors that influence immigration and migration experiences.

A History of the Cuban Revolution

Author: Aviva Chomsky

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444329561

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 7858

A History of the Cuban Revolution presents a concise socio-historical account of the Cuban Revolution of 1959, an event that continues to spark debate 50 years later. Balances a comprehensive overview of the political and economic events of the revolution with a look at the revolution’s social impact Provides a lively, on-the-ground look at the lives of ordinary people Features both U.S. and Cuban perspectives to provide a complete and well-rounded look at the revolution and its repercussions Encourages students to understand history through the viewpoint of individuals living it Selected as a 2011 Outstanding Academic Title by CHOICE

Debating American Immigration, 1882--present

Author: Roger Daniels,Otis L. Graham

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780847694105

Category: History

Page: 231

View: 5125

In Debating American Immigration, 1882-Present, prominent historians Roger Daniels and Otis Graham offer competing interpretations of the past, present, and future of American immigration policy and American attitudes towards immigration. Through original essays and supporting primary documents, the authors provide recommendations for future policies and legal remedies. This compact and clearly written text is an excellent introduction to one of today's most emotionally charged issues around the world.

Pedagogy of Indignation

Author: Paulo Freire

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317254430

Category: Political Science

Page: 176

View: 1082

This is the first English translation of the last book written by Paulo Freire. Pedagogy of Indignation delves ever deeper into the themes that concerned him throughout his life. The book begins with a series of three deeply moving reflective "pedagogical letters" to the reader about the role of education for one's development of self. He also speaks directly to the reader about the relationship to risk in one's life and he delves deeper than before into the daily life tensions between freedom and authority. Building on these interconnected themes, Freire sharpens our sense of the critical faculties of children and how a teacher may work with children to help them realize their potential intellectually and as human beings. Subsequent chapters explore these topics in relation to the wider social world: the social constitution of the self in the work of educators; critical citizenship; and the necessity of teaching "from a position" about the world that goes beyond literacy programs to include the legacy of colonialism in peoples' resistance movements today. The book's poignant interludes, written by Ana Maria Araujo Freire, reveal Paulo's thoughts about the content of this book as he was completing it during the last weeks and days of his life.

The Far Away Brothers

Two Young Migrants and the Making of an American Life

Author: Lauren Markham

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 1101906197

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 6790

The deeply reported story of identical twin brothers who escape El Salvador's violence to build new lives in California—fighting to survive, to stay, and to belong. Growing up in rural El Salvador in the wake of the civil war, the United States was a distant fantasy to identical twins Ernesto and Raul Flores—until, at age seventeen, a deadly threat from the region’s brutal gangs forces them to flee the only home they’ve ever known. In this urgent chronicle of contemporary immigration, journalist Lauren Markham follows the Flores twins as they make their way across the Rio Grande and the Texas desert, into the hands of immigration authorities, and from there to their estranged older brother in Oakland, CA. Soon these unaccompanied minors are navigating school in a new language, working to pay down their mounting coyote debt, and facing their day in immigration court, while also encountering the triumphs and pitfalls of teenage life with only each other for support. With intimate access and breathtaking range, Markham offers an unforgettable testament to the migrant experience. NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW | WINNER OF THE RIDENHOUR BOOK PRIZE | SILVER WINNER OF THE CALIFORNIA BOOK AWARD | FINALIST FOR THE LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE | SHORTLISTED FOR THE J. ANTHONY LUKAS BOOK PRIZE | LONGLISTED FOR THE PEN/BOGRAD WELD PRIZE FOR BIOGRAPHY

The Hidden Brain

How Our Unconscious Minds Elect Presidents, Control Markets, Wage Wars, and Save Our Lives

Author: Shankar Vedantam

Publisher: Spiegel & Grau

ISBN: 9781588369390

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 8214

The hidden brain is the voice in our ear when we make the most important decisions in our lives—but we’re never aware of it. The hidden brain decides whom we fall in love with and whom we hate. It tells us to vote for the white candidate and convict the dark-skinned defendant, to hire the thin woman but pay her less than the man doing the same job. It can direct us to safety when disaster strikes and move us to extraordinary acts of altruism. But it can also be manipulated to turn an ordinary person into a suicide terrorist or a group of bystanders into a mob. In a series of compulsively readable narratives, Shankar Vedantam journeys through the latest discoveries in neuroscience, psychology, and behavioral science to uncover the darkest corner of our minds and its decisive impact on the choices we make as individuals and as a society. Filled with fascinating characters, dramatic storytelling, and cutting-edge science, this is an engrossing exploration of the secrets our brains keep from us—and how they are revealed.

The Strange Death of Europe

Immigration, Identity, Islam

Author: Douglas Murray

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472942221

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 9542

The Sunday Times number one bestseller The Strange Death of Europe is a highly personal account of a continent and culture caught in the act of suicide. Declining birth-rates, mass immigration and cultivated self-distrust and self-hatred have come together to make Europeans unable to argue for themselves and incapable of resisting their own comprehensive change as a society. This book is not only an analysis of demographic and political realities, but also an eyewitness account of a continent in self-destruct mode. It includes reporting from across the entire continent, from the places where migrants land to the places they end up, from the people who appear to welcome them in to the places which cannot accept them. Told from this first-hand perspective, and backed with impressive research and evidence, the book addresses the disappointing failure of multiculturalism, Angela Merkel's U-turn on migration, the lack of repatriation and the Western fixation on guilt. Murray travels to Berlin, Paris, Scandinavia, Lampedusa and Greece to uncover the malaise at the very heart of the European culture, and to hear the stories of those who have arrived in Europe from far away. In each chapter he also takes a step back to look at the bigger issues which lie behind a continent's death-wish, answering the question of why anyone, let alone an entire civilisation, would do this to themselves? He ends with two visions of Europe – one hopeful, one pessimistic – which paint a picture of Europe in crisis and offer a choice as to what, if anything, we can do next.