The White Man's Burden

Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good

Author: William Easterly,William Russell Easterly

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781594200373

Category: Social Science

Page: 436

View: 7860

Argues that western foreign aid efforts have done little to stem global poverty, citing how such organizations as the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank are not held accountable for ineffective practices that the author believes intrude into the inner workings of other countries. By the author of The Elusive Quest for Growth. 60,000 first printing.

The White Man's Burden

Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good

Author: William Easterly

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101218129

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 4658

From one of the world’s best-known development economists—an excoriating attack on the tragic hubris of the West’s efforts to improve the lot of the so-called developing world In his previous book, The Elusive Quest for Growth, William Easterly criticized the utter ineffectiveness of Western organizations to mitigate global poverty, and he was promptly fired by his then-employer, the World Bank. The White Man’s Burden is his widely anticipated counterpunch—a brilliant and blistering indictment of the West’s economic policies for the world’s poor. Sometimes angry, sometimes irreverent, but always clear-eyed and rigorous, Easterly argues that we in the West need to face our own history of ineptitude and draw the proper conclusions, especially at a time when the question of our ability to transplant Western institutions has become one of the most pressing issues we face.

The Bottom Billion

Why the Poorest Countries are Failing and What Can Be Done About It

Author: Paul Collier

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019804254X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 224

View: 9162

In the universally acclaimed and award-winning The Bottom Billion, Paul Collier reveals that fifty failed states--home to the poorest one billion people on Earth--pose the central challenge of the developing world in the twenty-first century. The book shines much-needed light on this group of small nations, largely unnoticed by the industrialized West, that are dropping further and further behind the majority of the world's people, often falling into an absolute decline in living standards. A struggle rages within each of these nations between reformers and corrupt leaders--and the corrupt are winning. Collier analyzes the causes of failure, pointing to a set of traps that ensnare these countries, including civil war, a dependence on the extraction and export of natural resources, and bad governance. Standard solutions do not work, he writes; aid is often ineffective, and globalization can actually make matters worse, driving development to more stable nations. What the bottom billion need, Collier argues, is a bold new plan supported by the Group of Eight industrialized nations. If failed states are ever to be helped, the G8 will have to adopt preferential trade policies, new laws against corruption, new international charters, and even conduct carefully calibrated military interventions. Collier has spent a lifetime working to end global poverty. In The Bottom Billion, he offers real hope for solving one of the great humanitarian crises facing the world today. "Set to become a classic. Crammed with statistical nuggets and common sense, his book should be compulsory reading." --The Economist "If Sachs seems too saintly and Easterly too cynical, then Collier is the authentic old Africa hand: he knows the terrain and has a keen ear.... If you've ever found yourself on one side or the other of those arguments--and who hasn't?--then you simply must read this book." --Niall Ferguson, The New York Times Book Review "Rich in both analysis and recommendations.... Read this book. You will learn much you do not know. It will also change the way you look at the tragedy of persistent poverty in a world of plenty." --Financial Times

The Tyranny of Experts

Economists, Dictators, and the Forgotten Rights of the Poor

Author: William Easterly

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465080901

Category: Political Science

Page: 416

View: 1717

Over the last century, global poverty has largely been viewed as a technical problem that merely requires the right “expert” solutions. Yet all too often, experts recommend solutions that fix immediate problems without addressing the systemic political factors that created them in the first place. Further, they produce an accidental collusion with “benevolent autocrats,” leaving dictators with yet more power to violate the rights of the poor. In The Tyranny of Experts, economist William Easterly, bestselling author of The White Man's Burden, traces the history of the fight against global poverty, showing not only how these tactics have trampled the individual freedom of the world's poor, but how in doing so have suppressed a vital debate about an alternative approach to solving poverty: freedom. Presenting a wealth of cutting-edge economic research, Easterly argues that only a new model of development—one predicated on respect for the individual rights of people in developing countries, that understands that unchecked state power is the problem and not the solution —will be capable of ending global poverty once and for all.

Dead Aid

Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa

Author: Dambisa Moyo

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780374139568

Category: Political Science

Page: 188

View: 2723

Describes the state of postwar development policy in Africa that has channeled billions of dollars in aid but failed to either reduce poverty or increase growth, offering a hopeful vision of how to address the problem.

Poor Economics

A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty

Author: Abhijit Banerjee,Esther Duflo

Publisher: PublicAffairs

ISBN: 1610391608

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 320

View: 9255

Why do the poor borrow to save? Why do they miss out on free life-saving immunizations, but pay for unnecessary drugs? In Poor Economics, Abhijit V. Banerjee and Esther Duflo, two practical visionaries working toward ending world poverty, answer these questions from the ground. In a book the Wall Street Journal called “marvelous, rewarding,” the authors tell how the stress of living on less than 99 cents per day encourages the poor to make questionable decisions that feed—not fight—poverty. The result is a radical rethinking of the economics of poverty that offers a ringside view of the lives of the world's poorest, and shows that creating a world without poverty begins with understanding the daily decisions facing the poor.

The Elusive Quest for Growth

Economists' Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics

Author: William Easterly

Publisher: MIT Press (MA)

ISBN: 9780262272117

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 357

View: 505

Since the end of World War II, economists have tried to figure out how poor countries in the tropics could attain higher standards of living. The problem is not the failure of economics, Easterly argues, but the failure to apply economic principles to practical policy work. Illustrations.

Encountering Development

The Making and Unmaking of the Third World

Author: Arturo Escobar

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691150451

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 290

View: 7702

Originally published: 1995. Paperback reissue, with a new preface by the author.

Getting Better

Why Global Development Is Succeeding--And How We Can Improve the World Even More

Author: Charles Kenny

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465032885

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 256

View: 2344

As the income gap between developed and developing nations grows, so grows the cacophony of voices claiming that the quest to find a simple recipe for economic growth has failed. Getting Better, in sharp contrast, reports the good news about global progress. Economist Charles Kenny argues against development naysayers by pointing to the evidence of widespread improvements in health, education, peace, liberty--and even happiness. Kenny shows how the spread of cheap technologies, such as vaccines and bed nets, and ideas, such as political rights, has transformed the world. He also shows that by understanding this transformation, we can make the world an even better place to live. That's not to say that life is grand for everyone, or that we don't have a long way to go. But improvements have spread far, and, according to Kenny, they can spread even further.

Development as Freedom

Author: Amartya Sen

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 9780307874290

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 384

View: 508

By the winner of the 1988 Nobel Prize in Economics, an essential and paradigm-altering framework for understanding economic development--for both rich and poor--in the twenty-first century. Freedom, Sen argues, is both the end and most efficient means of sustaining economic life and the key to securing the general welfare of the world's entire population. Releasing the idea of individual freedom from association with any particular historical, intellectual, political, or religious tradition, Sen clearly demonstrates its current applicability and possibilities. In the new global economy, where, despite unprecedented increases in overall opulence, the contemporary world denies elementary freedoms to vast numbers--perhaps even the majority of people--he concludes, it is still possible to practically and optimistically restain a sense of social accountability. Development as Freedom is essential reading.

Why Nations Fail

The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty

Author: Daron Acemoglu,James A. Robinson

Publisher: Crown Books

ISBN: 0307719227

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 529

View: 5129

An award-winning professor of economics at MIT and a Harvard University political scientist and economist evaluate the reasons that some nations are poor while others succeed, outlining provocative perspectives that support theories about the importance of institutions. Reprint.

The Idealist

Jeffrey Sachs and the Quest to End Poverty

Author: Nina Munk

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 0385537743

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 7743

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Bloomberg • Forbes • The Spectator Recipient of Foreign Policy's 2013 Albie Award A powerful portrayal of Jeffrey Sachs's ambitious quest to end global poverty "The poor you will always have with you," to cite the Gospel of Matthew 26:11. Jeffrey Sachs—celebrated economist, special advisor to the Secretary General of the United Nations, and author of the influential bestseller The End of Poverty—disagrees. In his view, poverty is a problem that can be solved. With single-minded determination he has attempted to put into practice his theories about ending extreme poverty, to prove that the world's most destitute people can be lifted onto "the ladder of development." In 2006, Sachs launched the Millennium Villages Project, a daring five-year experiment designed to test his theories in Africa. The first Millennium village was in Sauri, a remote cluster of farming communities in western Kenya. The initial results were encouraging. With his first taste of success, and backed by one hundred twenty million dollars from George Soros and other likeminded donors, Sachs rolled out a dozen model villages in ten sub-Saharan countries. Once his approach was validated it would be scaled up across the entire continent. At least that was the idea. For the past six years, Nina Munk has reported deeply on the Millennium Villages Project, accompanying Sachs on his official trips to Africa and listening in on conversations with heads-of-state, humanitarian organizations, rival economists, and development experts. She has immersed herself in the lives of people in two Millennium villages: Ruhiira, in southwest Uganda, and Dertu, in the arid borderland between Kenya and Somalia. Accepting the hospitality of camel herders and small-hold farmers, and witnessing their struggle to survive, Munk came to understand the real-life issues that challenge Sachs's formula for ending global poverty. THE IDEALIST is the profound and moving story of what happens when the abstract theories of a brilliant, driven man meet the reality of human life.

Challenges of CAFTA

Maximizing the Benefits for Central America

Author: Daniel Lederman

Publisher: World Bank Publications

ISBN: 0821364456

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 289

View: 3865

"The report provides a preliminary assessment of DR-CAFTA, with particular attention to three key themes: (i) expected trade and non-trade benefits, (ii) actions that Central American countries need to pursue to capitalize optimally on the new opportunities, and (iii) identification of the population groups that may require assistance to adapt to a more competitive environment. The Introductory Chapter reviews the main findings of the report. Chapter II places DR-CAFTA in the historical context of the economic reforms that Central America has been undertaking since the late 1980s. Chapter III provides a summary overview of the recently negotiated DR-CAFTA. Chapter IV reviews various analyses that assess the potential impacts of DR-CAFTA in Central American countries. Chapter V focuses on the identification of potentially affected populations from the easing of trade restrictions in sensitive agricultural products and analyzes policy options to assist vulnerable groups. Chapter VI reviews evidence related to key macroeconomic implications of DR-CAFTA, namely the potential revenue losses and effect on the patterns of business-cycle synchronization. Chapter VII reviews evidence from each Central American country in the areas of trade facilitation, institutional and regulatory reforms, and innovation and education, in order to identify key priorities for the complementary agenda for DR-CAFTA."

Reinventing Foreign Aid

Author: William Easterly

Publisher: Mit Press

ISBN: 9780262550666

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 567

View: 5621

The urgency of reducing poverty in the developing world has been the subject of a public campaign by such unlikely policy experts as George Clooney, Alicia Keyes, Elton John, Angelina Jolie, and Bono. And yet accompanying the call for more foreign aid is an almost universal discontent with the effectiveness of the existing aid system. In Reinventing Foreign Aid, development expert William Easterly has gathered top scholars in the field to discuss how to improve foreign aid. These authors, Easterly points out, are not claiming that their ideas will (to invoke a current slogan) Make Poverty History. Rather, they take on specific problems and propose some hard-headed solutions. Easterly himself, in an expansive and impassioned introductory chapter, makes a case for the "searchers"--who explore solutions by trial and error and learn from feedback--over the "planners"--who throw an endless supply of resources at a big goal--as the most likely to reduce poverty. Other writers look at scientific evaluation of aid projects (including randomized trials) and describe projects found to be cost-effective, including vaccine delivery and HIV education; consider how to deal with the government of the recipient state (work through it or bypass a possibly dysfunctional government?); examine the roles of the International Monetary Fund (a de-facto aid provider) and the World Bank; and analyze some new and innovative proposals for distributing aid. William Easterly is the author of The Elusive Quest for Growth: Economists' Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics (MIT Press, 2001) and The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good. He is Professor of Economics at New York University (Joint with Africa House), Codirector of NYU's Development Research Institute, visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution, and Nonresident Fellow of the Center for Global Development in Washington, DC. Contributors Abhijit Banerjee, Nancy Birdsall, Craig Burnside, Esther Duflo, Domenico Fanizza, William Easterly, Ruimin He, Kurt Hoffman, Stephen Knack, Michael Kremer, Mari Kuraishi, Ruth Levine, Bertin Martens, John McMillan, Edward Miguel, Jonathan Morduch, Todd Moss, Gunilla Pettersson, Lant Pritchett, Steven Radelet, Aminur Rahman, Ritva Reinikka, Jakob Svensson, Nicolas van de Walle, James Vreeland, Dennis Whittle, Michael Woolcock

The White Man's Burden

Historical Origins of Racism in the United States

Author: Winthrop D. Jordan

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195017434

Category: Mathematics

Page: 229

View: 9370

An abridgement of the prize-winning White Over Black

The Wretched of the Earth

Author: Frantz Fanon

Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.

ISBN: 9780802198853

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 5153

Frantz Fanon was one of the twentieth century’s most important theorists of revolution, colonialism, and racial difference, and this, his masterwork, is a classic alongside Orientalism and The Autobiography of Malcolm X. The Wretched of the Earth is a brilliant analysis of the psychology of the colonized and their path to liberation. Bearing singular insight into the rage of colonized peoples and the role of violence in historical change, the book also incisively attacks postindependence disenfranchisement of the masses by the elite on one hand, and intertribal and interfaith animosities on the other. A veritable handbook of social reorganization for leaders of emerging nations, The Wretched of the Earth has had a major impact on civil rights, anticolonialism, and black-consciousness movements around the world. This new translation updates its language for a new generation of readers and its lessons are more vital now than ever.

The Economics of International Development

Foreign Aid Versus Freedom for the World's Poor 2016

Author: William Easterly

Publisher: Readings in Political Economy

ISBN: 9780255367318

Category: Economic assistance

Page: 114

View: 7220

The authors challenge the assumption that we can bring about economic development and promote liberal democracies through direct foreign intervention - whether economic or military intervention. The lead author, William Easterly, drawing on his wide experience at the World Bank and as an academic, is a renowned sceptic of intervention.

Social Entrepreneurship in the Age of Atrocities

Changing Our World

Author: Zachary Daniel Kaufman

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN: 1781002142

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 259

View: 6481

ïHow can anyone make a difference in a world marked by genocide, civil war, refugee crises, disease epidemics? With conscience, hope, and sweat equity, Dr. Zachary Kaufman and the other contributors to this book have offered aid, created organizations serving victims of human rights violations, and learned from set-backs and failures. Their insight into challenges of sustainable fund-raising, organizational design and management, and skepticism about young Western volunteers can inspire and instruct others who hope to address suffering and injustice through initiative, analysis, and commitment.Í _ Martha Minow, Dean of the Faculty of Law and Jeremiah Smith, Jr. Professor of Law, Harvard Law School; Author, Between Vengeance and Forgiveness: Facing History After Genocide and Mass Violence ïThis book makes an all too rare and important point: One of the distinguishing characteristics of social entrepreneurs is the way their actions and their example pave the way for peace. Kaufman gives us multiple examples here to demonstrate that the kind of empathetic leadership exhibited by these social entrepreneurs builds an alternative to conflict and contributes to the stability and security of societies.Í _ Dr. Diana Wells, President, Ashoka ïUnder the able editorship of Dr. Zachary Kaufman, an upstander in his own right, this pathbreaking book demystifies social entrepreneurship, namely, citizen-inspired initiatives that may have as much potential to overcome the challenges burdening victims of atrocities and other assaults on humankind as social media has demonstrated in revolutionizing how people communicate in the 21st Century.Í _ The Honorable David J. Scheffer, Mayer Brown / Robert A. Helman Professor of Law and Director, Center for International Human Rights, Northwestern University School of Law; former U.S. Ambassador at Large for War Crimes Issues; Author, All the Missing Souls: A Personal History of the War Crimes Tribunals ïThe accounts of social entrepreneurs contained in this volume could well inspire a future shortlist for the Nobel Peace Prize. Zachary Kaufman has coupled impressive narratives with compelling analysis in a collection that informs observers but that will also stimulate more young people to take up the challenges of responding to atrocities.Í _ Dr. William A. Schabas, Professor of International Law, Middlesex University (London); Author, Genocide in International Law: The Crime of Crimes; Commissioner, Sierra Leone Truth and Reconciliation Commission ïThis splendid book is more than a primer on social entrepreneurship for human rights in the developing world. It is also a compendium of searing testimony about the immense practical challenges that idealistic changemakers can overcome by dint of their unflagging energy, incandescent visions of humanity and justice, and on-the-ground skills and resourcefulness. Zachary Kaufman has performed a great public service in orchestrating this admirable volume about how hope for the future can be vindicated even under the most unpromising conditions.Í _ Peter H. Schuck, Simeon E. Baldwin Professor Emeritus of Law, Yale Law School ïAt last, a compelling narrative of the recent achievements to address pressing global issues through social entrepreneurship! This book is a tribute to the authorÍs ethical convictions and the generation of innovators that he represents. As Chairman of UNITAID, the first laboratory of innovative financing, IÍve seen how a small levy on airline tickets can save thousands of lives every year through market solutions. It warms me to see how young thinkers continue to innovate and act to provide global public goods. Pay attention to them!Í _ Philippe Douste-Blazy UN Under Secretary-General in charge of Innovative Financing for Development, Chairman of UNITAID and former French minister of foreign affairs ïAt a time when so many reflexively look to government action as a remedy for todayÍs ills, this valuable book demonstrates the power of social entrepreneurs to take on some of the worldÍs great challenges. Social entrepreneurship is grounded in real-world experience. The projects this book profiles demonstrate the impact of individuals as agents of change _ taking ideas and turning them into action that can help transform entire societies.Í _ Dr. Arthur C. Brooks, President, The American Enterprise Institute; Author, Social Entrepreneurship: A Modern Approach to Social Value Creation ïFor anyone who doubted one person could change the world or just wondered how to get started, Dr. KaufmanÍs book is equal parts inspiration and how-to guide. He has lived and studied social entrepreneurship, and provides a serious contribution to the emerging field of social entrepreneurship, particularly as it relates to genocide and other atrocities.Í _ The Honorable Tom Perriello, former U.S. Congressman; former Special Advisor to the Prosecutor, Special Court for Sierra Leone; Co-Founder, DarfurGenocide.org; current President & CEO, Center for American Progress Action ïSocial Entrepreneurship in the Age of Atrocities is a welcome contribution to the study of one of the most promising social movements in recent time, the mobilization of engaged citizens, or Upstanders, in the face of mass atrocities around the world. Zachary Kaufman incisively investigates how social entrepreneurs are taking on tough issues including conflict prevention and transitional justice, and presents practical lessons learned from the perspective of activists on the ground.Í _ John Prendergast, Co-Founder, Enough Project, Center for American Progress; former Director for African Affairs, U.S. National Security Council; Co-Author, Unlikely Brothers: Our Story of Adventure, Loss, and Redemption; Co-Author, Not on Our Watch: The Mission to End Genocide in Darfur and Beyond ïSocial Entrepreneurship in the Age of Atrocities interweaves two critical movements: social entrepreneurship and human rights. Kaufman is one of the first to explore these intersections in a powerfully informative way. He and his fellow social entrepreneurs provide concrete examples of, and offer practical advice about, the power of ordinary people to confront one of the most intractable problems: mass atrocities. Kaufman demonstrates how we can all be ñupstandersî in the face of such conflicts.Í _ Mark Hanis, Co-Founder & Board member of United to End Genocide (formerly Save Darfur / Genocide Intervention Network); Ashoka Fellow; Echoing Green Fellow ïDr. KaufmanÍs book is a huge addition to the field, and his focus [on atrocities] is spot on. Looking at social entrepreneurship through the lens offered in this book will provide the field with new insights and inspiration. Bravo!Í _ Peter Brinckerhoff, author of Smart Stewardship for Nonprofits: Making the Right Decision in Good Times and Bad and Social Entrepreneurship: The Art of Mission-Based Venture Development ïSocial Entrepreneurship in the Age of Atrocities deftly outlines how young global peace entrepreneurs are successfully fostering smart and agile solutions to some of the worldÍs most intractable problems. Gone are the tired images of doves and peace signs, rightfully replaced with laptops and smart phones. This is a must read for all young leaders who strive to have real impact in their careers, as well as the old guard if they care not to be left behind by the winds of change.Í _ Cameron M. Chisholm, Founder and President, International Peace & Security Institute ïIn an age of austerity, with governments and international organizations limited in their capacity to address atrocities, Dr. Zachary KaufmanÍs book is a timely reminder of the power of social entrepreneurs to effect critical change. But this is no romantic account of the ability of inspired individuals to make a difference after mass conflict. As an insidersÍ view of entrepreneurship, this book gives a warts-and-all account of the personal, political, social, and economic challenges that must be overcome and the energy, risk-taking, and good fortune required to achieve even modest results. Highlighting the crucial work of social entrepreneurs, this collection also provides a necessary critique of the failures of governments and international bodies such as the UN to respond coherently to the challenges of post-conflict societies.Í _ Dr. Phil Clark, Lecturer in Comparative and International Politics, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London; Co-Founder, Oxford Transitional Justice Research, University of Oxford; Author, The Gacaca Courts, Post-Genocide Justice and Reconciliation in Rwanda: Justice Without Lawyers; Co-Editor, After Genocide: Transitional Justice, Post-Conflict Reconstruction, and Reconciliation in Rwanda and Beyond ïSocial Entrepreneurship in the Age of Atrocities is a bold work of definition and analyses. It presents both concepts and histories _ focused on individuals and groups _ in response to mass violence and atrocities. This significant study, edited by Zachary Kaufman, is a work of clarification and inspiration.Í _ Dr. Judith S. Goldstein, Founder and Executive Director, Humanity in Action ïThis book is nothing less than an antidote against despondency. In and of itself an innovation, Dr. Zachary KaufmanÍs collection of personal narratives by change agents reveals a pattern of how people are bringing light to areas where there seems to be nothing but darkness. The remarkably simple recipe of these social entrepreneurs is to take a good dose of caring, add an innovative solution, and finally knead the project through the phases of iterative testing and growth until impact is achieved. Finally we have in this book an addition to the ever-growing library of literature on human rights and atrocities that is not a call to arms or a cry of accusatory indignation, but a cheerful invitation to roll up oneÍs sleeves.Í _ Dr. Fernande Raine, Social Innovation Leader, Innosight; former Senior Team Member, Ashoka; former management consultant, McKinsey & Company; former Executive Director, Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University ïDr. Zachary Kaufman provides powerful lessons for anyone committed to preventing atrocities, ending conflicts, building peace, and fostering systematic and sustainable positive social change. The compelling and honest first-hand accounts by leading social entrepreneurs working in diverse sectoral areas help ground the field by providing unique insight into the many opportunities, successes, and challenges encountered through the difficult task of change making. This powerful text will inspire many young people and others to take action and work hard in pursuing innovative ways to address some of the most complex, seemingly intractable problems facing the world today. This book should be required reading for anyone seeking to positively impact the world, one step at a time.Í _ Dr. Craig Zelizer, Associate Director, Conflict Resolution Program, Georgetown University; Founder, Peace and Collaborative Development Network ïZachary KaufmanÍs new book expands the term social entrepreneur to include human rights advocates _ in this instance, young people from the Global North, who have chosen to speak out, stand up, and intervene in the complex contexts of war, atrocity, and civil conflict. KaufmanÍs provocative book includes case studies that will help challenge prevailing definitions of this emerging field as it explores how, where, and why social entrepreneurs are engaging with the intersection of geo-politics, international law, and social change.Í _ Kavita N. Ramdas, Executive Director, Program on Social Entrepreneurship, Stanford University; former President & CEO, Global Fund for Women Social Entrepreneurship in the Age of Atrocities provides crucial insight into social entrepreneurship from visionaries in the field as well as other experienced practitioners and renowned theorists. While this book focuses on social entrepreneurship as it relates to genocide and other atrocities, the experiences and lessons learned also apply to additional critical social, economic, legal and political problems such as healthcare, development, education and literacy. The authors in this book address the clear need for further examination of social entrepreneurship. They discuss the challenges, obstacles and opportunities of the field and lend new insight to the concept, history and methodologies of social entrepreneurship. The book profiles case studies based on some of the most innovative and effective social enterprises addressing atrocities, including the National Vision for Sierra Leone, Asylum Access, the Kigali Public Library, Indego Africa, Generation Rwanda, Orphans Against AIDS, Americans for Informed Democracy, and Children of Abraham. Social Entrepreneurship in the Age of Atrocities will inform, instruct and build the community of social entrepreneurs. This unique, essential collection of first-hand accounts is an inspiring and informative addition to the evolving social entrepreneurship literature. It will be of particular interest to social entrepreneurs; students, scholars and practitioners of business, management, public policy, social policy and development studies; anyone with a philanthropic mindset; and all those who are invested in creating and maintaining a socially responsible, accountable world.

The Great Surge

The Ascent of the Developing World

Author: Steven Radelet

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476764786

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 368

View: 443

The untold story of the global poor today: A distinguished expert and advisor to developing nations reveals how we’ve reduced poverty, increased incomes, improved health, curbed violence, and spread democracy—and how to ensure the improvements continue. We live today at a time of great progress for the global poor. Never before have so many people, in so many developing countries, made so much progress. Most people believe the opposite: that with a few exceptions like China and India, the majority of developing countries are hopelessly mired in deep poverty, led by inept dictators, and living with pervasive famine, widespread disease, constant violence, and little hope for change. But a major transformation is underway—and has been for two decades now. Since the early 1990s more than 700 million people have been lifted out of extreme poverty, six million fewer children die every year from disease, tens of millions more girls are in school, millions more people have access to clean water, and democracy—often fragile and imperfect—has become the norm in developing countries around the world. The Great Surge tells the remarkable story of this unprecedented economic, social, and political transformation. It shows how the end of the Cold War, the development of new technologies, globalization, courageous local leadership, and in some cases, good fortune, have combined to dramatically improve the fate of hundreds of millions of people in poor countries around the world. Most importantly, The Great Surge reveals how we can fight the changing tides of climate change, resource demand, economic and political mismanagement, and demographic pressures to accelerate the political, economic, and social development that has been helping the poorest of the poor around the world.

The Challenge of Climate Change

Which Way Now?

Author: Daniel P. Perlmutter,Robert L. Rothstein

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119958210

Category: Science

Page: 248

View: 2351

Global warming and climate change present complex interlocking issues of public policy, multilateral negotiation, and technological advancement. This book explores both the problems and the opportunities presented by international agreements, and examines the technological developments and policy goals that can be pursued to effect the changes necessary. Specific steps are proposed in the form of a list of priorities. This book represents a cooperative enterprise between two authors of different backgrounds - engineering and international relations - and is directed to an educated but non-professional lay audience without any formal training in either science or international relations. The points of view of negotiators from both developed and developing nations are presented and compared. Each topic is presented from both technical and policy perspectives as a means to evaluate the variety of proposals that have been offered as remedies to global warming. The text is supported by illustrations and tables where appropriate, including a list of References at the end of each chapter.