The Shaping of the Sussex Landscape

Author: Peter Brandon

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781906022167

Category: Human geography

Page: 96

View: 979

How did Sussex get to look like what it looks like today? What does its distinctive landscape tell us about how people lived and worked in the past? What impact have invasion, technology, war and, most importantly, sheep made on it? This book explores how today's landscape is the joint and ongoing creation of nature's long shift.

The Making of the British Landscape

Author: Nicholas Crane

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780753826676

Category:

Page: 384

View: 5588

Nicholas Crane's new book brilliantly describes the evolution of Britain's countryside and cities. It is part journey, part history, and it concludes with awkward questions about the future of Britain's landscapes. Nick Crane's story begins with the melting tongues of glaciers and the emergence of a gigantic game-park tentatively being explored by a vanguard of Mesolithic adventurers who have taken the long, northward hike across the land bridge from the continent. The Iron Age develops into a pre-Roman 'Golden Era' and Crane looks at what the Romans did (and didn't) contribute to the British landscape. Major landscape 'events' (Black Death, enclosures, urbanisation, recreation, etc.) are fully described and explored, and he weaves in the role played by geology in shaping our cities, industry and recreation, the effect of climate (and the Gulf Stream), and of global economics (the Lancashire valleys were formed by overseas markets). The co-presenter of BBC's COAST also covers the extraordinary benefits bestowed by a 6,000-mile coastline. The 12,000-year story of the British landscape culminates in the twenty-first century, which is set to be one of the most extreme centuries of change since the Ice Age.

The Making of the British Landscape

How We Have Transformed the Land, from Prehistory to Today

Author: Francis Pryor

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 014194336X

Category: History

Page: 832

View: 3492

This is the changing story of Britain as it has been preserved in our fields, roads, buildings, towns and villages, mountains, forests and islands. From our suburban streets that still trace out the boundaries of long vanished farms to the Norfolk Broads, formed when medieval peat pits flooded, from the ceremonial landscapes of Stonehenge to the spread of the railways - evidence of how man's effect on Britain is everywhere. In The Making of the British Landscape, eminent historian, archaeologist and farmer, Francis Pryor explains how to read these clues to understand the fascinating history of our land and of how people have lived on it throughout time. Covering both the urban and rural and packed with pictures, maps and drawings showing everything from how we can still pick out Bronze Age fields on Bodmin Moor to how the Industrial Revolution really changed our landscape, this book makes us look afresh at our surroundings and really see them for the first time.

The Discovery of Sussex

Author: Peter Brandon

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781860776168

Category: Sussex (England)

Page: 288

View: 909

There is a greater difference between life in Sussex today and life one hundred years ago than there was between the times of our great-grandparents and of Queen Elizabeth, for in 1900 Sussex away from the seaside resorts had more in common with the Sussex of 1700 than today's county. Horse power still set the pace of life and thistledown floated up from the spacious sheepwalks in high summer. Hazel and chestnut coppice was still cut regularly, men had not left off singing, and the bell-teams of wagon horses on the road were familiar sounds in what was called 'sleepy, snoozy, Sussex'. This book examines the social, cultural and environmental changes which went into the making of modern Sussex from the end of the 18th century, particularly those that resulted from the invasion of wideeyed Londoners as tourists and health-seekers, writers and artists, weekenders or permanent residents, in the half-century up to 1939. Those in favour of innovation and progress, who wanted to let things run their course, gave their active or tacit support to change, but there were others who abhorred the modern age and tried angrily to reverse the process. There were also those who fought on behalf of the countryside and resisted urbanisation by means of landscape protection, thus saving much of the county from bricks and mortar. Sussex became a foil to the metropolis on its doorstep, functioning as a re-discovered Eden in the guise of an undeclared national park, with values and lifestyles at variance with those of the capital city. The remarkable efflorescence of painting, writing, arts and crafts, domestic architecture, and landscape design and planning was deeply affected by the nostalgia for the countryside which accompanied the rapid and largely unplanned metropolitan growth. Writers and promoters of tourism created a rural ideology designed to meet the strains and stresses of the new urban mode of existence.

The South Downs

Author: Peter Brandon

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781860770692

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 4911

The South Downs has throughout history been a focus of English popular culture. With chalkland, their river valleys and scarp-foot the Downs have been shaped for over millennia by successive generations of farmers, ranging from Europe’s oldest inhabitants right up until the 21st century. “... possibly the most important book to have been written on the South Downs in the last half-century ... The South Downs have found their perfect biographer.” Downs Country

The English Rural Landscape

Author: Joan Thirsk

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 828

From pre-history to the present day our landscape has been transformed by dramatic human disturbance, triggered by the rise and fall of populations and their need to be fed, housed, and employed. These changes have built-up layers of evidence which today present historians with exciting new insights about land use and rural communities of the past. In this groundbreaking new study Joan Thirsk and her team of distinguished contributors, many of whom live in the very landscape they so intimately describe, invite us to explore the historical richness of the English landscape. Each chapter synthesizes the very latest thinking and provides fresh perspectives on its specific subject. The first ten chapters in turn describe the characteristic features of the main regional landscape types, including fenlands, downlands, woodlands, marshlands, and moorlands, showing that, however physically scattered they may be, they have been moulded by successive generations to produce many uniting similarities.

History Beyond the Text

A Student’s Guide to Approaching Alternative Sources

Author: Sarah Barber,Corinna Peniston-Bird

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135688710

Category: History

Page: 210

View: 5444

Historians are increasingly looking beyond the traditional, and turning to visual, oral, aural, and virtual sources to inform their work. The challenges these sources pose require new skills of interpretation and require historians to consider alternative theoretical and practical approaches. In order to help historians successfully move beyond traditional text, Sarah Barber and Corinna Peniston-Bird bring together chapters from historical specialists in the fields of fine art, photography, film, oral history, architecture, virtual sources, music, cartoons, landscape and material culture to explain why, when and how these less traditional sources can be used. Each chapter introduces the reader to the source, suggests the methodological and theoretical questions historians should keep in mind when using it, and provides case studies to illustrate best practice in analysis and interpretation. Pulling these disparate sources together, the introduction discusses the nature of historical sources and those factors which are unique to, and shared by, the sources covered throughout the book. Taking examples from around the globe, this collection of essays aims to inspire practitioners of history to expand their horizons, and incorporate a wide variety of primary sources in their work.

Elite Women and the Agricultural Landscape, 1700–1830

Author: Briony McDonagh

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317145119

Category: Social Science

Page: 190

View: 9795

Social and economic histories of the long eighteenth century have largely ignored women as a class of landowners and improvers. 1700 to 1830 was a period in which the landscape of large swathes of the English Midlands was reshaped – both materially and imaginatively – by parliamentary enclosure and a bundle of other new practices. Outside the Midlands too, local landscapes were remodelled in line with the improving ideals of the era. Yet while we know a great deal about the men who pushed forward schemes for enclosure and sponsored agricultural improvement, far less is known about the role played by female landowners and farmers and their contributions to landscape change. Drawing on examples from across Georgian England, Elite Women and the Agricultural Landscape, 1700–1830 offers a detailed study of elite women’s relationships with landed property, specifically as they were mediated through the lens of their estate management and improvement. This highly original book provides an explicitly feminist historical geography of the eighteenth-century English rural landscape. It addresses important questions about propertied women’s role in English rural communities and in Georgian society more generally, whilst contributing to wider cultural debates about women’s place in the environmental, social and economic history of Britain. It will be of interest to those working in Historical and Cultural Geography, Social, Economic and Cultural History, Women’s Studies, Gender Studies and Landscape Studies.

Landscape of Dreams

The Gardens of Isabel & Julia Bannerman

Author: Isabel Bannerman,Julian Bannerman

Publisher: Pimpernel Press

ISBN: 9781910258262

Category: Gardening

Page: 296

View: 7883

Isabel and Julian Bannerman have been described as "mavericks in the grand manner, touched by genius" (Min Hogg, World of Interiors) and "the Bonnie and Clyde of garden design" (Ruth Guilding, The Bible of British Taste). Their approach to design, while rooted in history and the classical tradition, is fresh, eclectic and surprising. They designed the British 9/11 Memorial Garden in New York and have also designed gardens for the Prince of Wales at Highgrove and the Castle of Mey, Lord Rothschild at Waddesdon Manor, the Duke and Duchess of Norfolk at Arundel Castle in Sussex and John Paul Getty II at Wormsley in Buckinghamshire. The garden they made for themselves at Hanham Court near Bath was acclaimed by Gardens Illustrated as the top garden of 2009, ahead of Sissinghurst. When they moved from Hanham it was to the fairytale castle of Trematon overlooking Plymouth Sound, where they have created yet another magical garden. Landscape of Dreams celebrates the imaginative and practical process of designing, making and planting all of these gardens, and many more.

A Landscape Legacy

Author: John Brookes

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781910258934

Category:

Page: 208

View: 2590

It is no exaggeration to say that John Brookes transformed twentieth-century garden design, not only in his native Britain but throughout the world. He fundamentally changed the way people think about their gardens. In his first book, Room Outside, in 1969, he wrote, A garden is essentially a place for use by people . . . not a static picture created by plants . . . plants provide the props, the colour and texture, but the garden is the stage and its design should be determined by the uses it is intended to fulfil. Today, nearly fifty years on, he emphasizes the importance of reconciling nature and the character of a landscape with the needs and visions of the people living in it. Over those fifty years he has designed gardens - and taught garden design - in the United States, Canada and South America, in Russia and Japan, in Iran and Kashmir, and all over Europe - always consulting the vernacular of an area, its materials and how they are used, as well as its plants . Now, in A Landscape Legacy John Brookes tells the story of his life and work and reflects on how his thinking about garden design, and design generally, has developed.

Great Gardens of Britain

Author: Helena Attlee

Publisher: Frances Lincoln

ISBN: 9780711231344

Category: Gardening

Page: 144

View: 1740

Britain is famous all over the world for its gardens. In this book Helena Attlee focuses on twenty of the finest gardens in the country. Her choice encompasses a rich selection of sites all over England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, ranging from famous eighteenth-century landscapes such as Stourhead to quirky modern gardens such as Charles Jencks' Garden of Cosmic Speculation in the Scottish borders. Her lively text provides a brief history of each garden combined with a vivid account of its main features. Alex Ramsay's dazzling photographs reveal the gardens at their best. Gardens include: Crathes (Inverness), Crarae (Argyll & Bute), Garden of Cosmic Speculation (Dumfries), Little Sparta (Lanarkshire), Alnwick (Northumberland), Levens (Cumbria), Scampston (Yorkshire), Mount Stewart (Co. Down), Bodnant (Clwyd), Powis Castle (Powys), Stourhead (Wiltshire), Hidcote (Gloucestershire), Great Dixter (Sussex), East Rushton (Norfolk), Beth Chatto's Garden (Essex), Kew (London), Wisley (Surrey), Sissinghurst (Kent), Eden Project (Cornwall), Tresco (Scilly Isles).

A Literary History of Women's Writing in Britain, 1660–1789

Author: Susan Staves

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139458582

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 1351

Drawing on three decades of feminist scholarship bent on rediscovering lost and abandoned women writers, Susan Staves provides a comprehensive history of women's writing in Britain from the Restoration to the French Revolution. This major work of criticism also offers fresh insights about women's writing in all literary forms, not only fiction, but also poetry, drama, memoir, autobiography, biography, history, essay, translation and the familiar letter. Authors celebrated in their own time and who have been neglected, and those who have been revalued and studied, are given equal attention. The book's organisation by chronology and its attention to history challenge the way we periodise literary history. Each chapter includes a list of key works written in the period covered, as well as a narrative and critical assessment of the works. This magisterial work includes a comprehensive bibliography and list of prevalent editions of the authors discussed.

Landscape Photographer of the Year: Collection 11

Author: Charlie Waite

Publisher: Landscape Photographer of the

ISBN: 9780749579074

Category: Photography

Page: 224

View: 2439

The Landscape Photographer of the Year competition is the brainchild of Charlie Waite, one of today's most respected landscape photographers. With AA Publishing, he created this prestigious competition and award with a total prize fund exceeding �20,000, coupled with an exhibition in London showcasing the best of the competition. The full-color book showcasing the best entries has been hugely successful in its first 10 years. Like the others before it, the 11th edition features both classic shots of verdant rural countryside and stark urban landscapes capturing the beauty and diversity of 21st century Britain.

The Outdoor Room

Author: Jamie Durie,Simon Kenny

Publisher: Allen & Unwin

ISBN: 9781741750218

Category: House & Home

Page: 202

View: 5683

Now in paperback: the second spectacular full-colour garden design book from Jamie Durie, host of the hugely successful Backyard Blitz and The Block.

Gardens in the Modern Landscape

A Facsimile of the Revised 1948 Edition

Author: Christopher Tunnard

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812222911

Category: Architecture

Page: 208

View: 6289

Between 1937 and 1938, garden designer Christopher Tunnard published a series of articles in the British Architectural Review that rejected the prevailing English landscape style. Inspired by the principles of Modernist art and Japanese aesthetics, Tunnard called for a "new technique" in garden design that emphasized an integration of form and purpose. "The functional garden avoids the extremes both of the sentimental expressionism of the wild garden and the intellectual classicism of the 'formal' garden," he wrote; "it embodies rather a spirit of rationalism and through an aesthetic and practical ordering of its units provides a friendly and hospitable milieu for rest and recreation." Tunnard's magazine pieces were republished in book form as Gardens in the Modern Landscape in 1938, and a revised second edition was issued a decade later. Taken together, these articles constituted a manifesto for the modern garden, its influence evident in the work of such figures as Lawrence Halprin, Philip Johnson, and Edward Larrabee Barnes. Long out of print, the book is here reissued in a facsimile of the 1948 edition, accompanied by a contextualizing foreword by John Dixon Hunt. Gardens in the Modern Landscape heralded a sea change in the evolution of twentieth-century design, and it also anticipated questions of urban sprawl, historic preservation, and the dynamic between the natural and built environments. Available once more to students, practitioners, and connoisseurs, it stands as a historical document and an invitation to continued innovative thought about landscape architecture.

The Summer Before the War

A Novel

Author: Helen Simonson

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0679644644

Category: Fiction

Page: 512

View: 7986

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “A novel to cure your Downton Abbey withdrawal . . . a delightful story about nontraditional romantic relationships, class snobbery and the everybody-knows-everybody complications of living in a small community.”—The Washington Post The bestselling author of Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand returns with a breathtaking novel of love on the eve of World War I that reaches far beyond the small English town in which it is set. NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE WASHINGTON POST AND NPR East Sussex, 1914. It is the end of England’s brief Edwardian summer, and everyone agrees that the weather has never been so beautiful. Hugh Grange, down from his medical studies, is visiting his Aunt Agatha, who lives with her husband in the small, idyllic coastal town of Rye. Agatha’s husband works in the Foreign Office, and she is certain he will ensure that the recent saber rattling over the Balkans won’t come to anything. And Agatha has more immediate concerns; she has just risked her carefully built reputation by pushing for the appointment of a woman to replace the Latin master. When Beatrice Nash arrives with one trunk and several large crates of books, it is clear she is significantly more freethinking—and attractive—than anyone believes a Latin teacher should be. For her part, mourning the death of her beloved father, who has left her penniless, Beatrice simply wants to be left alone to pursue her teaching and writing. But just as Beatrice comes alive to the beauty of the Sussex landscape and the colorful characters who populate Rye, the perfect summer is about to end. For despite Agatha’s reassurances, the unimaginable is coming. Soon the limits of progress, and the old ways, will be tested as this small Sussex town and its inhabitants go to war. Praise for The Summer Before the War “What begins as a study of a small-town society becomes a compelling account of war and its aftermath.”—Woman’s Day “This witty character study of how a small English town reacts to the 1914 arrival of its first female teacher offers gentle humor wrapped in a hauntingly detailed story.”—Good Housekeeping “Perfect for readers in a post–Downton Abbey slump . . . The gently teasing banter between two kindred spirits edging slowly into love is as delicately crafted as a bone-china teacup. . . . More than a high-toned romantic reverie for Anglophiles—though it serves the latter purpose, too.”—The Seattle Times “[Helen Simonson’s] characters are so vivid, it’s as if a PBS series has come to life. There’s scandal, star-crossed love and fear, but at its heart, The Summer Before the War is about loyalty, love and family.”—AARP: The Magazine “This luminous story of a family, a town, and a world in their final moments of innocence is as lingering and lovely as a long summer sunset.”—Annie Barrows, author of The Truth According to Us and co-author of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society “Simonson is like a Jane Austen for our day and age—she is that good—and The Summer Before the War is nothing short of a treasure.”—Paula McLain, author of The Paris Wife and Circling the Sun