The Supreme Court

Author: Lawrence Baum

Publisher: CQ Press

ISBN: 1483376133

Category: Political Science

Page: 264

View: 6460

The Supreme Court, Twelfth Edition, examines all major aspects of the highest court in the nation, from the selection of justices and agenda creation to the decision-making process and the Court’s impact on government and U.S. society. Delving deeply into personalities and procedures, author Lawrence Baum provides a balanced explanation of the Court’s actions and the behavior of its justices as he reveals its complexity, reach, and influence. This new edition gives particular attention to current developments such as the impact of political polarization on the Court, the justices’ increasingly public roles, and recent rulings on same-sex marriage and health care.

Decision

How the Supreme Court Decides Cases

Author: Bernard Schwartz

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195118006

Category: Law

Page: 288

View: 6474

Explains how the United States Supreme Court works, including how it selects and works on cases

Murphy on Evidence

Author: Richard Glover,Peter Murphy

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199669872

Category: Law

Page: 738

View: 3898

Murphy on Evidence is a leading text for undergraduates and those studying for professional law exams. It bridges the gap between academic and practical treatments of the law of evidence, combining detailed analysis with a wealth of practical information about how the law is applied in the courtroom, illustrated through two realistic case studies.

The Supreme Court Compendium

Data, Decisions, and Developments

Author: Lee Epstein,Jeffrey A. Segal,Harold J. Spaeth,Thomas G. Walker

Publisher: CQ Press

ISBN: 148337663X

Category: Law

Page: 872

View: 7289

The Supreme Court Compendium provides historical and statistical information on the Supreme Court: its institutional development; caseload; decision trends; the background, nomination, and voting behavior of its justices; its relationship with public, governmental, and other judicial bodies; and its impact. With over 180 tables and figures, this new edition is intended to capture the full retrospective picture through the 2013-2014 term of the Roberts Court and the momentous decisions handed down within the last four years, including United States v. Windsor, National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, and Shelby County v. Holder.

A History of the Supreme Court

Author: the late Bernard Schwartz

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199774668

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 9126

When the first Supreme Court convened in 1790, it was so ill-esteemed that its justices frequently resigned in favor of other pursuits. John Rutledge stepped down as Associate Justice to become a state judge in South Carolina; John Jay resigned as Chief Justice to run for Governor of New York; and Alexander Hamilton declined to replace Jay, pursuing a private law practice instead. As Bernard Schwartz shows in this landmark history, the Supreme Court has indeed travelled a long and interesting journey to its current preeminent place in American life. In A History of the Supreme Court, Schwartz provides the finest, most comprehensive one-volume narrative ever published of our highest court. With impeccable scholarship and a clear, engaging style, he tells the story of the justices and their jurisprudence--and the influence the Court has had on American politics and society. With a keen ability to explain complex legal issues for the nonspecialist, he takes us through both the great and the undistinguished Courts of our nation's history. He provides insight into our foremost justices, such as John Marshall (who established judicial review in Marbury v. Madison, an outstanding display of political calculation as well as fine jurisprudence), Roger Taney (whose legacy has been overshadowed by Dred Scott v. Sanford), Oliver Wendell Holmes, Louis Brandeis, Benjamin Cardozo, and others. He draws on evidence such as personal letters and interviews to show how the court has worked, weaving narrative details into deft discussions of the developments in constitutional law. Schwartz also examines the operations of the court: until 1935, it met in a small room under the Senate--so cramped that the judges had to put on their robes in full view of the spectators. But when the new building was finally opened, one justice called it "almost bombastically pretentious," and another asked, "What are we supposed to do, ride in on nine elephants?" He includes fascinating asides, on the debate in the first Court, for instance, over the use of English-style wigs and gowns (the decision: gowns, no wigs); and on the day Oliver Wendell Holmes announced his resignation--the same day that Earl Warren, as a California District Attorney, argued his first case before the Court. The author brings the story right up to the present day, offering balanced analyses of the pivotal Warren Court and the Rehnquist Court through 1992 (including, of course, the arrival of Clarence Thomas). In addition, he includes four special chapters on watershed cases: Dred Scott v. Sanford, Lochner v. New York, Brown v. Board of Education, and Roe v. Wade. Schwartz not only analyzes the impact of each of these epoch-making cases, he takes us behind the scenes, drawing on all available evidence to show how the justices debated the cases and how they settled on their opinions. Bernard Schwartz is one of the most highly regarded scholars of the Supreme Court, author of dozens of books on the law, and winner of the American Bar Association's Silver Gavel Award. In this remarkable account, he provides the definitive one-volume account of our nation's highest court.

The Constitution in the Supreme Court

The First Hundred Years, 1789-1888

Author: David P. Currie

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226131092

Category: Law

Page: 504

View: 4572

Currie's masterful synthesis of legal analysis and narrative history, gives us a sophisticated and much-needed evaluation of the Supreme Court's first hundred years. "A thorough, systematic, and careful assessment. . . . As a reference work for constitutional teachers, it is a gold mine."—Charles A. Lofgren, Constitutional Commentary

The Supreme Court in United States History

Author: Charles Warren

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN: 1616405171

Category: Law

Page: 554

View: 3841

The Supreme Court in United States History is a three-volume history of the U.S. Supreme Court, detailing its establishment, the major cases reviewed and decided by the Court, the historical events surrounding cases and decisions, and the effects that Supreme Court decisions had on the public. Author Charles Warren often references newspaper and magazine articles and letters in an attempt to capture the spirit of the times. Written with one eye on the Court and one eye on people, The Supreme Court in United States History was "an attempt to revivify the important cases decided by the Court and to picture the Court itself from year to year in its contemporary setting." Volume III describes Supreme Court History from 1856-1918, including the Dred Scott, Booth, Milligan, and Slaughterhouse Cases, The Civil War and Reconstruction, the reign of Chief Justices Chase, Waite, Fuller, and White, The Fourteenth Amendment and Civil Rights Acts, and the expansion of judicial powers. CHARLES WARREN (1868-1954) was an American legal historian and lawyer. Warren graduated from Harvard University and Harvard Law School, and received his Doctorate from Columbia University. In 1894, he founded the Immigration Restriction League with fellow Harvard graduates Prescott Hall and Robert DeCourcy Ward. He authored several legal history books, including A History of the American Bar, The Supreme Court in United States History, and The Making of the Constitution, and won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1923. Warren was the Assistant Attorney General from 1914 to 1918 during Woodrow Wilson's Presidency and drafted the Espionage Act of 1917.

A First Amendment Profile of the Supreme Court

Author: Craig Smith

Publisher: University of Delaware

ISBN: 1611493625

Category: Political Science

Page: 194

View: 2489

A First Amendment Profile of the Supreme Court focuses on the nine justices of the United States Supreme Court and determines their frames for assessing First Amendment cases. In each of the chapters, a justice will be profiled in terms of his or her claims during the nomination hearings and the positions they have taken in significant Supreme Court decisions. The object of these chapters is to provide a rhetorical frame that each of these justices would find appealing regarding First Amendment case law.

The Supreme Court and American Democracy

Case Studies on Judicial Review and Public Policy

Author: Earl E. Pollock

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0313365253

Category: Law

Page: 419

View: 6227

Topically arranged casebook of U.S. Supreme Court decisions with extensive commentary dissects the Court's decisions on current "hot-button" national policy issues.

The Supreme Court and the Presidency

Struggles for Supremacy

Author: Julie Novkov

Publisher: CQ Press

ISBN: 1452234175

Category: Law

Page: 472

View: 7574

The Supreme Court and the Presidency: Struggles for Supremacy This newest edition to The Supreme Court’s Power in American Politics series explores and analyzes the dynamic alliances and tensions between the nation’s chief executive and the Court over time. Through primary source and other documents and insightful narratives, this work discusses appointments, prerogative governance, and the role of time and regimes in the complex scheme of checks and balances. Featured topics include: Major theories of constitutional interpretation and their application to the exercise of executive power The political dynamics in the relationship between the three branches of federal government The evolution of executive authority and the struggle over the legislative veto Precedents for treaty-making and executive agreements with foreign governments Executive and legislative relations and powers in times of war and national emergency, particularly after 9/11 The president’s authority as commander-in-chief Historical controversies of executive privilege and censure and impeachment Executive authority to issue pardons Appendix with comparative data about conventional and Court periodization

Meine geliebte Welt

Author: Sonia Sotomayor

Publisher: C.H.Beck

ISBN: 3406659489

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 349

View: 416

Aufgewachsen in der Bronx, Puertoricanerin, die Kindheit prekär, der Vater Alkoholiker, die Mutter überfordert – Sonia Sotomayor war es nicht gerade in die Wiege gelegt, eines Tages Richterin am höchsten Gericht der Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika zu werden. Mit einem großen Herzen und viel Humor erzählt diese Ausnahmefrau von ihrem Weg, aber nicht um sich dabei auf die Schulter zu klopfen, sondern um anderen Menschen mit ihrer eigenen Geschichte Mut zu machen. Ein hinreißendes, ansteckendes Buch über das Trotzdem und über die – wirklich wichtigen – Dinge des Lebens. „’Nach der Lektüre werden mich die Leser nach menschlichen Kriterien beurteilen’, schreibt Sonia Sotomayor. Wir, die wir in diesem Fall die Jury sind, finden sie einfach unwiderstehlich.“ Washingtonian „Überwältigende und stark geschriebene Memoiren zum Thema Identität und Persönlichkeitsfindung ... Offenherzig, scharf beobachtet und vor allem tief empfunden.“ The New York Times „Eine Frau, die weiß, wo sie herkommt und die die Kraft hat, uns dorthin mitzunehmen.“ The New York Times Book Review

Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Transformation of the Supreme Court

Author: Stephen K. Shaw,William D. Pederson,Frank J. Williams

Publisher: M.E. Sharpe

ISBN: 9780765610331

Category: History

Page: 271

View: 6084

Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed ten justices to the U.S. Supreme Court - more than any president except Washington - and during his presidency from 1933 to 1945, the Court gained more visibility, underwent greater change, and made more landmark decisions than it had in its previous 150 years of existence. FDR challenged, confronted, and ultimately transformed the Supreme Court from a conservative, anti-interventionist institution opposed to government involvement in the economy to a liberal, activist Court that expanded government powers, protected civil liberties, and promoted civil rights. This collection of ten essays examines FDR's influence on the Supreme Court and the Court's growing influence on American life during his presidency. Subjects include the court-packing fight of 1937, the impact of the New Deal on the Court, key FDR appointments (Hugo Black, Felix Frankfurter, and William O. Douglas), and the Roosevelt Court's enduring legacy.

Freedom of Expression in the Supreme Court

The Defining Cases

Author: Terry Eastland

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780847697106

Category: Law

Page: 397

View: 3018

In Freedom of Expression in the Supreme Court, Terry Eastland brings together the Court's leading First Amendment cases, some 60 in all, starting with Schenck v. United States (1919) and ending with Reno v. American Civil Liberties Union (1998). Complete with a comprehensive introduction, pertinent indices and a useful bibliography, Freedom of Expression in the Supreme Court offers the general and specialized reader alike a thorough treatment of the Court's understanding on the First Amendment's speech, press, assembly, and petition clauses.

The U.S. Supreme Court

A Very Short Introduction

Author: Linda Greenhouse

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN: 0199754543

Category: History

Page: 126

View: 4782

A Supreme Court reporter offers an introduction to one of the pillars of American government, focusing on the people and traditions of the U.S. Supreme Court and examining many individual Supreme Court cases.

“Race,” Rights and the Law in the Supreme Court of Canada

Historical Case Studies

Author: James W. St.G. Walker

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 0889205663

Category: Political Science

Page: 464

View: 2503

Four cases in which the legal issue was “race” — that of a Chinese restaurant owner who was fined for employing a white woman; a black man who was refused service in a bar; a Jew who wanted to buy a cottage but was prevented by the property owners’ association; and a Trinidadian of East Indian descent who was acceptable to the Canadian army but was rejected for immigration on grounds of “race” — drawn from the period between 1914 and 1955, are intimately examined to explore the role of the Supreme Court of Canada and the law in the racialization of Canadian society. With painstaking research into contemporary attitudes and practices, Walker demonstrates that Supreme Court Justices were expressing the prevailing “common sense” about “race” in their legal decisions. He shows that injustice on the grounds of “race” has been chronic in Canadian history, and that the law itself was once instrumental in creating these circumstances. The book concludes with a controversial discussion of current directions in Canadian law and their potential impact on Canada’s future as a multicultural society.