The Stripping of the Altars

Traditional Religion in England, C.1400-c.1580

Author: Eamon Duffy

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300108286

Category: Religion

Page: 654

View: 8866

Recreating lay people's experience of the religion of the pre-Reformation church, this text argues that late-medieval Catholicism was neither decadent nor decayed, but was a strong & vigorous tradition, & that the Reformation represented a violent rupture from a popular & thoroughly respectable religious system. Previous ed.: 1992.

The Stripping of the Altars

Traditional Religion in England, 1400?1580, Second Edition

Author: Eamon Duffy

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300197764

Category: Religion

Page: 666

View: 1849

This prize-winning account of the pre-Reformation church recreates lay people’s experience of religion in fifteenth-century England. Eamon Duffy shows that late medieval Catholicism was neither decadent nor decayed, but was a strong and vigorous tradition, and that the Reformation represented a violent rupture from a popular and theologically respectable religious system. For this edition, Duffy has written a new Preface reflecting on recent developments in our understanding of the period. From reviews of the first edition: “A magnificent scholarly achievement [and] a compelling read.”—Patricia Morrison, Financial Times “Deeply imaginative, movingly written, and splendidly illustrated. . . . Duffy’s analysis . . . carries conviction.”—Maurice Keen, New York Review of Books “This book will afford enjoyment and enlightenment to layman and specialist alike.”—Peter Heath, Times Literary Supplement “[An] astonishing and magnificent piece of work.”—Edward T. Oakes, Commonweal

The Voices of Morebath

Reformation and Rebellion in an English Village

Author: Eamon Duffy

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300098259

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 6506

The religious upheavals of the 16th century that transformed English rural life were captured by Sir Christopher Trychay, the priest of Morebath, Devon, who recorded parish meetings between 1520 and 1574. Unlike most parish records, Trychay's records are full of names, incidental details, opinions and prejudices. Interspersed throughout Duffy's engaging narrative, itself packed with detail, are extracts from Trychay's records, with modern English translations. These record life in a small, piously Catholic parish and the effects of enforced protestantism, the disastrous West Country Prayer Book Rebellion of 1549 and Elizabeth's taxation.

Marking the Hours

English People and Their Prayers 1240-1570

Author: Eamon Duffy

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300117141

Category: History

Page: 201

View: 8864

Discussing the book of hours, this work examines surviving copies of the personal prayer books, which were used for private, domestic devotions, and in which people commonly left traces of their lives. It teases out clues to the private thoughts and public contexts of their owners.

Reformation Divided

Catholics, Protestants and the Conversion of England

Author: Eamon Duffy

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472934377

Category: Religion

Page: 448

View: 8303

Published to mark the 500th anniversary of the events of 1517, Reformation Divided explores the impact in England of the cataclysmic transformations of European Christianity in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The religious revolution initiated by Martin Luther is usually referred to as 'The Reformation', a tendentious description implying that the shattering of the medieval religious foundations of Europe was a single process, in which a defective form of Christianity was replaced by one that was unequivocally benign, 'the midwife of the modern world'. The book challenges these assumptions by tracing the ways in which the project of reforming Christendom from within, initiated by Christian 'humanists' like Erasmus and Thomas More, broke apart into conflicting and often murderous energies and ideologies, dividing not only Catholic from Protestant, but creating deep internal rifts within all the churches which emerged from Europe's religious conflicts. The book is in three parts: In 'Thomas More and Heresy', Duffy examines how and why England's greatest humanist apparently abandoned the tolerant humanism of his youthful masterpiece Utopia, and became the bitterest opponent of the early Protestant movement. 'Counter-Reformation England' explores the ways in which post-Reformation English Catholics accommodated themselves to a complex new identity as persecuted religious dissidents within their own country, but in a European context, active participants in the global renewal of the Catholic Church. The book's final section 'The Godly and the Conversion of England' considers the ideals and difficulties of radical reformers attempting to transform the conventional Protestantism of post-Reformation England into something more ardent and committed. In addressing these subjects, Duffy shines new light on the fratricidal ideological conflicts which lasted for more than a century, and whose legacy continues to shape the modern world.

The Late Medieval English Church

Vitality and Vulnerability Beford the Break with Rome

Author: G.W. Bernard

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300182589

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 1390

The later medieval English church is invariably viewed through the lens of the Reformation that transformed it. But in this bold and provocative book historian George Bernard examines it on its own terms, revealing a church with vibrant faith and great energy, but also with weaknesses which reforming bishops worked to overcome. Bernard emphasises royal control over the church. He examines the challenges facing bishops and clergy, and assesses the depth of lay knowledge and understanding of the teachings of the church, highlighting the practice of pilgrimage. He reconsiders anti-clerical sentiment and the extent and significance of heresy. He shows that the Reformation was not inevitable: the late medieval church was much too full of vitality. But Bernard also argues that alongside that vitality, and often closely linked to it, were vulnerabilities that made the break with Rome and the dissolution of the monasteries possible. The result is a thought-provoking study of a church and society in transformation.

Saints, Sacrilege and Sedition

Religion and Conflict in the Tudor Reformations

Author: Eamon Duffy

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1472909178

Category: England

Page: 320

View: 4704

Eamon Duffy publishes a book on the broad sweep of English Reformation history, including a study of Late Medieval religion and society.

Faith of Our Fathers

Reflections on Catholic Tradition

Author: Eamon Duffy

Publisher: Continuum International Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780826474797

Category: Religion

Page: 187

View: 2390

Publisher description: In Faith of our fathers, Duffy considers the range of Catholic belief and practice, from prayer for the dead and veneration of the Eucharist, to the place of Mary and the authority of the Pope. In the process he explores the ways in which religious tradition can be a vital Christian resource in the turbulent modern world.

Saints and Sinners

A History of the Popes; Fourth Edition

Author: Eamon Duffy

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300207085

Category: Religion

Page: 500

View: 9425

This engrossing book encompasses the extraordinary history of the papacy, from its beginnings to the present day. This new edition covers the unprecedented resignation of Benedict XVI and the election of the first Argentinian pope. Praise for the earlier editions: “Duffy enlivens the long march through church history with anecdotes that bring the different pontiffs to life. . . . Saints and Sinners is a remarkable achievement.”—Piers Paul Read, The Times (London) “A distinguished text . . . offering plenty of historical facts and sobering, valuable judgments.”—Henry Chadwick, New York Times Book Review “Will fascinate anyone wishing to better understand the history of the Catholic Church and the forces that have shaped the role of the papacy.”—Gloria J. Tysl, Christian Century

English Reformations

Religion, Politics, and Society Under the Tudors

Author: Christopher Haigh

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0198221622

Category: History

Page: 367

View: 6629

English Reformations takes a refreshing new approach to the study of the Reformation in England. Christopher Haigh's lively and readable study disproves any facile assumption that the triumph of Protestantism was inevitable, and goes beyond the surface of official political policy to explore the religious views and practices of ordinary English people. With the benefit of hindsight, other historians have traced the course of the Reformation as a series of events inescapably culminating in the creation of the English Protestant establishment. Haigh sets out to recreate the sixteenth century as a time of excitement and insecurity, with each new policy or ruler causing the reversal of earlier religious changes. This is a scholarly and stimulating book, which challenges traditional ideas about the Reformation and offers a powerful and convincing alternative analysis.

The English Reformation Revised

Author: Christopher Haigh

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521336314

Category: History

Page: 229

View: 4994

Twenty years ago, historians thought they understood the Reformation in England. Professor A. G. Dickens's elegant The English Reformation was then new, and highly influential: it seemed to show how national policy and developing reformist allegiance interacted to produce an acceptable and successful Protestant Reformation. But, since then, the evidence of the statute book, of Protestant propagandists and of heresy trials has come to seem less convincing, Neglected documents, especially the records of diocesan administration and parish life, have been explored, new questions have been asked - and many of the answers have been surprising. Some of the old certainties have been demolished, and many of the assumptions of the old interpretation of the Reformation have been undermined, in a wide-ranging process of revision. But the fruits of the new 'revisionism' are still buried in technical academic journals, difficult for students and teachers to find and to use. There is no up-to-date textbook, no comprehensive new survey, to challenge the orthodoxies enshrined in older works. This volume seeks to fulfill two crucial needs for students of Tudor England. First, it brings together some of the most readable of the recent innovative essays and articles into a single book. Second, it seeks to show how a new 'revisionist' interpretation of the English Reformation can be constructed, and examines its strengths and weaknesses. In short, it is an alternative to a new textbook survey - until someone has time (and courage) to write one. The new Introduction sets out the framework for a new understanding of the Reformation, and shows how already published work can be fitted into it. The nine essays (one printed here for the first time) provide detailed studies of particular problems in Reformation history, and general surveys of the progress of religious change. The new Conclusion tries to plug some of the remaining gaps, and suggests how the Reformation came to divide the English nation. It is a deliberately controversial collection, to be used alongside existing textbooks and to promote rethinking and debate.

Heretics and Believers

A History of the English Reformation

Author: Peter Marshall

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300226330

Category: Religion

Page: 480

View: 9146

A sumptuously written people’s history and a major retelling and reinterpretation of the story of the English Reformation Centuries on, what the Reformation was and what it accomplished remain deeply contentious. Peter Marshall’s sweeping new history—the first major overview for general readers in a generation—argues that sixteenth-century England was a society neither desperate for nor allergic to change, but one open to ideas of “reform” in various competing guises. King Henry VIII wanted an orderly, uniform Reformation, but his actions opened a Pandora’s Box from which pluralism and diversity flowed and rooted themselves in English life. With sensitivity to individual experience as well as masterfully synthesizing historical and institutional developments, Marshall frames the perceptions and actions of people great and small, from monarchs and bishops to ordinary families and ecclesiastics, against a backdrop of profound change that altered the meanings of “religion” itself. This engaging history reveals what was really at stake in the overthrow of Catholic culture and the reshaping of the English Church.

Ten Popes Who Shook the World

Author: Eamon Duffy

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300176880

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 160

View: 9562

The Bishops of Rome have been Christianity's most powerful leaders for nearly two millennia, and their influence has extended far beyond the purely spiritual. The popes have played a central role in the history of Europe and the wider world, not only shouldering the spiritual burdens of their ancient office, but also in contending with - and sometimes precipitating - the cultural and political crises of their times. In an acclaimed series of BBC radio broadcasts Eamon Duffy explored the impact of ten popes he judged to be among 'the most influential in history'. With this book, readers may now also enjoy Duffy's portraits of ten exceptional men who shook the world. The book begins with St Peter, the Rock upon whom the Catholic Church was built, and follows with Leo the Great (fifth century), Gregory the Great (sixth century), Gregory VII (eleventh century), Innocent III (thirteenth century), Paul III (sixteenth century), and Pius IX (nineteenth century). Among twentieth-century popes, Duffy examines the lives and contributions of Pius XII, who was elected on the eve of the Second World War, the kindly John XXIII, who captured the world's imagination, and John Paul II, the first non-Italian pope in 450 years. Each of these ten extraordinary individuals, Duffy shows, shaped their own worlds, and in the process, helped to create ours.

Fires of Faith

Catholic England under Mary Tudor

Author: Eamon Duffy

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300160453

Category: Religion

Page: 280

View: 442

The reign of Mary Tudor has been remembered as an era of sterile repression, when a reactionary monarch launched a doomed attempt to reimpose Catholicism on an unwilling nation. Above all, the burning alive of more than 280 men and women for their religious beliefs seared the rule of “Bloody Mary” into the protestant imagination as an alien aberration in the onward and upward march of the English-speaking peoples. In this controversial reassessment, the renowned reformation historian Eamon Duffy argues that Mary's regime was neither inept nor backward looking. Led by the queen's cousin, Cardinal Reginald Pole, Mary’s church dramatically reversed the religious revolution imposed under the child king Edward VI. Inspired by the values of the European Counter-Reformation, the cardinal and the queen reinstated the papacy and launched an effective propaganda campaign through pulpit and press. Even the most notorious aspect of the regime, the burnings, proved devastatingly effective. Only the death of the childless queen and her cardinal on the same day in November 1558 brought the protestant Elizabeth to the throne, thereby changing the course of English history.

Beliefs and the Dead in Reformation England

Author: Peter Marshall

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191542911

Category: History

Page: 356

View: 3367

This is the first comprehensive study of one of the most important aspects of the Reformation in England: its impact on the status of the dead. Protestant reformers insisted vehemently that between heaven and hell there was no 'middle place' of purgatory where the souls of the departed could be assisted by the prayers of those still living on earth. This was no remote theological proposition, but a revolutionary doctrine affecting the lives of all sixteenth-century English people, and the ways in which their Church and society were organized. This book illuminates the (sometimes ambivalent) attitudes towards the dead to be discerned in pre-Reformation religious culture, and traces (up to about 1630) the uncertain progress of the 'reformation of the dead' attempted by Protestant authorities, as they sought both to stamp out traditional rituals and to provide the replacements acceptable in an increasingly fragmented religious world. It also provides detailed surveys of Protestant perceptions of the afterlife, of the cultural meanings of the appearance of ghosts, and of the patterns of commemoration and memory which became characteristic of post-Reformation England. Together these topics constitute an important case-study in the nature and tempo of the English Reformation as an agent of social and cultural transformation. The book speaks directly to the central concerns of current Reformation scholarship, addressing questions posed by 'revisionist' historians about the vibrancy and resilience of traditional religious culture, and by 'post-revisionists' about the penetration of reformed ideas. Dr Marshall demonstrates not only that the dead can be regarded as a significant 'marker' of religious and cultural change, but that a persistent concern with their status did a great deal to fashion the distinctive appearance of the English Reformation as a whole, and to create its peculiarities and contradictory impulses.

The Autobiography of a Hunted Priest

Author: John Gerard

Publisher: Ignatius Press

ISBN: 1586174509

Category: Religion

Page: 395

View: 1665

Truth is stranger than fiction. And nowhere in literature is it so apparent as in this classic work, "The Autobiography of a Hunted Priest." This autobiography of a Jesuit priest in Elizabethan England is a most remarkable document and John Gerard, its author, a most remarkable priest in a time when to be a Catholic in England courted imprisonment and torture; to be a priest was treason by act of Parliament. Smuggled into England after his ordination and dumped on a Norfolk beach at night, Fr. Gerard disguised himself as a country gentleman and traveled about the country saying Mass, preaching and ministering to the faithful in secret always in constant danger. The houses in which he found shelter were frequently raided by priest hunters; priest-holes, hide-outs and hair-breadth escapes were part of his daily life. He was finally caught and imprisoned, and later removed to the infamous Tower of London where he was brutally tortured. The stirring account of his escape, by means of a rope thrown across the moat, is a daring and magnificent climax to a true story which, for sheer narrative power and interest, far exceeds any fiction. Here is an accurate and compelling picture of England when Catholics were denied their freedom to worship and endured vicious persecution and often martyrdom. But more than the story of a single priest, "The Autobiography of a Hunted Priest" epitomizes the constant struggle of all human beings through the ages to maintain their freedom. It is a book of courage and of conviction whose message is most timely for our age.

Light and Shadows

Church History Amid Faith, Fact and Legend

Author: Walter Brandmüller

Publisher: Ignatius Press

ISBN: 1586172735

Category: Religion

Page: 286

View: 7103

The Crusades, the Spanish Inquisition, the Reformation, and the Renaissance popes conjure in the imagination a corrupt Roman Catholic clergy hungry for wealth and power. In this insightful, well researched work, the Vatican's chief historian, Fr. Walter Brandmuller, takes a thoughtful and understanding look at these and other important chapters in Church history. Without denying, or flinching at, the human capacity for folly, failure, and evil, Brandmuller moves beyond the caricatures and legends that often substitute for real history to reveal a Church, both human and divine, fulfilling its mission in every time and place. His goal is not to whitewash any of these past events or issues, but rather to illuminate them, and bring to them a more in-depth, comprehensive historical understanding on the basis of their causes, circumstances and effects. "Now let us take into consideration Church history from the theological viewpoint, highlighting another important aspect. Its essential duty, in fact, turns out to be the complex mission to investigate and clarify that process of reception and transmission, of paraleacute;psis and of paragrave;dosis, through which was substantiated, in the course of the ages, the Church's raison d'ecirc;tre. Indeed, it is beyond a doubt that the Church can draw inspiration for her choices by drawing on her centuries-old treasury of experience and memory." -Pope Benedict VXI, Address to the members of the Pontifical Committee for Historical Sciences, March 7, 2008

Cities of God

The Religion of the Italian Communes, 1125-1325

Author: Augustine Thompson

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271046273

Category: Religion

Page: N.A

View: 2819


Medieval Church Architecture

Author: Jon Cannon

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 074781533X

Category: Architecture

Page: 96

View: 9275

Britain is a treasure trove of medieval architecture. Almost every village and town in the land has a church that was built during the period, whose history is legible ? to those who know how to look ? in every arch, capital, roof vault, and detail of window tracery. By learning how to identify the stylistic phases that resulted from shifts in architectural fashion, it is possible to date each part of a church to within a decade or two; this book introduces all the key features of each succeeding style, from Anglo-Saxon and Norman through to the three great gothic styles, Early English, Decorated and Perpendicular. It will be indispensable to anyone who enjoys exploring medieval churches, and who wants to understand and appreciate their beauty more deeply.