The Story So Far

What We Know About the Business of Digital Journalism

Author: Bill Grueskin,Ava Seave,Lucas Graves

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231500548

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 146

View: 6781

Bill Grueskin, Ava Seave, and Lucas Graves spent close to a year tracking the reporting of on-site news organizations some of which were founded over a century ago and others established only in the past year or two and found in their traffic and audience engagement patterns, allocation of resources, and revenue streams ways to increase the profits of digital journalism. In chapters covering a range of concerns, from advertising models and alternative platforms to the success of paywalls, the benefits and drawbacks to aggregation, and the character of emerging news platforms, this volume identifies which digital media strategies make money, which do not, and which new approaches look promising. The most comprehensive analysis to date of digital journalism's financial outlook, this text confronts business challenges both old and new, large and small, suggesting news organizations embrace the unique opportunities of the internet rather than adapt web offerings to legacy business models. The authors ultimately argue that news organizations and their audiences must learn to accept digital platforms and their constant transformation, which demand faster and more consistent innovation and investment.

The Story So Far

What We Know About the Business of Digital Journalism

Author: Bill Grueskin,Ava Seave,Lucas Graves

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231160275

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 146

View: 5592

Can digital journalism be profitable? What's making money, what isn't, and why? Columbia University faculty members Bill Grueskin, academic dean of the Journalism School, and Ava Seave, principal at Quantum Media and adjunct professor at the Business School, addresses these questions about the financial state of digital journalism. The Story So Far offers the most comprehensive analysis to date of the business challenges that large and small, old and new for-profit news organizations face with their digital ventures. Grueskin, Seave, and Lucas Graves spent several months reporting on-site at news organizations—some that were founded over a century ago and others created in the past year or two. Based on that body of data, they examine how news organizations allocate resources, explore what patterns are emerging in revenue streams, and draw conclusions about how companies might generate revenue more effectively. The book is divided into nine chapters covering everything from advertising models at a diverse array of news organizations, to alternative platforms, new revenue streams and audience engagement. The authors argue that news organizations must do more to embrace the unique attributes of the Internet rather than trying to adapt Web offerings to legacy business models. The authors suggest that news organizations and their audiences "regard digital platforms as being in a constant state of transformation, one that demands a faster and more consistent pace of innovation and investment." Among their recommendations: Digital platforms should not simply repurpose existing news content. They should feature unique, high-value content designed specifically for digital media. Media companies should redefine the relationship between audience and advertising. Journalists must better understand their existing and potential audiences, and strive to ensure deeper loyalties. Media companies ought to rethink their relationships with advertisers and gain a fuller appreciation for how advertisers now reach their customers via social media, new-media ads and search engine optimization. News and marketing companies should move beyond the impression-based pricing systems that dominate online advertising, and forge new models that integrate digital ads and social-media outreach. Media companies must restore content value to digital advertising and move beyond the decade-old relics that convey little information or appeal to consumers. News organizations must balance vigilance about theft of content with the realization that most aggregators operate within the bounds of copyright law. They should accept the fact that this generates value for readers, and develop thoughtful approaches to understanding what topics best lend themselves to aggregation. Integration of a legacy division—news content or ad sales—with new media is not for everyone. Larger enterprises should consider creating separate digital staffs, particularly on the business side. Any news site that adopts a pay scheme now should have very limited expectations for its success—at least on the Web. Requiring digital readers to pay may help to slow circulation losses, but that is hardly a long-term solution. A pay plan merged with an ambitious strategy to improve users’ experience on mobile platforms has a much better chance to succeed.

Deciding What’s True

The Rise of Political Fact-Checking in American Journalism

Author: Lucas Graves

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231542224

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 320

View: 6439

Over the past decade, American outlets such as PolitiFact, FactCheck.org, and the Washington Post's Fact Checker have shaken up the political world by holding public figures accountable for what they say. Cited across social and national news media, these verdicts can rattle a political campaign and send the White House press corps scrambling. Yet fact-checking is a fraught kind of journalism, one that challenges reporters' traditional roles as objective observers and places them at the center of white-hot, real-time debates. As these journalists are the first to admit, in a hyperpartisan world, facts can easily slip into fiction, and decisions about which claims to investigate and how to judge them are frequently denounced as unfair play. Deciding What's True draws on Lucas Graves's unique access to the members of the newsrooms leading this movement. Graves vividly recounts the routines of journalists at three of these hyperconnected, technologically innovative organizations and what informs their approach to a story. Graves also plots a compelling, personality-driven history of the fact-checking movement and its recent evolution from the blogosphere, reflecting on its revolutionary remaking of journalistic ethics and practice. His book demonstrates the ways these rising organizations depend on professional networks and media partnerships yet have also made inroads with the academic and philanthropic worlds. These networks have become a vital source of influence as fact-checking spreads around the world.

Journalism After Snowden

The Future of the Free Press in the Surveillance State

Author: Emily Bell,Taylor Owen

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231540671

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 256

View: 9061

Edward Snowden's release of classified NSA documents exposed the widespread government practice of mass surveillance in a democratic society. The publication of these documents, facilitated by three journalists, as well as efforts to criminalize the act of being a whistleblower or source, signaled a new era in the coverage of national security reporting. The contributors to Journalism After Snowden analyze the implications of the Snowden affair for journalism and the future role of the profession as a watchdog for the public good. Integrating discussions of media, law, surveillance, technology, and national security, the book offers a timely and much-needed assessment of the promises and perils for journalism in the digital age. Journalism After Snowden is essential reading for citizens, journalists, and academics in search of perspective on the need for and threats to investigative journalism in an age of heightened surveillance. The book features contributions from key players involved in the reporting of leaks of classified information by Edward Snowden, including Alan Rusbridger, former editor-in-chief of The Guardian; ex-New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson; legal scholar and journalist Glenn Greenwald; and Snowden himself. Other contributors include dean of Columbia Graduate School of Journalism Steve Coll, Internet and society scholar Clay Shirky, legal scholar Cass Sunstein, and journalist Julia Angwin. Topics discussed include protecting sources, digital security practices, the legal rights of journalists, access to classified data, interpreting journalistic privilege in the digital age, and understanding the impact of the Internet and telecommunications policy on journalism. The anthology's interdisciplinary nature provides a comprehensive overview and understanding of how society can protect the press and ensure the free flow of information.

The Art of Making Magazines

On Being an Editor and Other Views from the Industry

Author: Victor S. Navasky,Evan Cornog

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231131372

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 179

View: 2491

Provides anecdotes and analysis covering a variety of issues in magazine publishing, including writing and editing articles, incorporating art and design, copyediting, and advertising.

Media Management in the Age of Giants

Business Dynamics of Journalism. Second Edition.

Author: Dennis F. Herrick

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 0826351646

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 416

View: 2816

The emergence of giant media corporations has created a new era in mass communications. The world of media giants—with a focus on the bottom line—makes awareness of business and financial issues critical for everyone in the industry. This timely new edition of a popular and successful textbook introduces basic business concepts, terminology, history, and management theories in the context of contemporary events. It includes up-to-date information on technology and addresses the major problem facing media companies today: How can the news regain profitability in the digital age? Focusing on newspaper, television, and radio companies, Herrick fills his book with real-life examples, interviews with media managers, and case studies. In a time when all the rules are changing because of digital technology, conglomeration, and shifting consumer habits, this text is a vital tool for students and working journalists.

The Best Business Writing 2013

Author: Dean Starkman,Martha Hamilton,Ryan Chittum,Felix Salmon

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231160755

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 568

View: 4185

An anthology Malcolm Gladwell has called "riveting and indispensable," The Best Business Writing is a far-ranging survey of business's dynamic relationship with politics, culture, and life. This year's selections include John Markoff ( New York Times) on innovations in robot technology and the decline of the factory worker; Evgeny Morozov ( New Republic) on the questionable value of the popular TED conference series and the idea industry behind it; Paul Kiel ( ProPublica) on the ripple effects of the ongoing foreclosure crisis; and the infamous op-ed by Greg Smith, published in the New York Times, announcing his break with Goldman Sachs over its trading practices and corrupt corporate ethos. Jessica Pressler ( New York) delves into the personal and professional rivalry between Tory and Christopher Burch, former spouses now competing to dominate the fashion world. Peter Whoriskey ( Washington Post) exposes the human cost of promoting pharmaceuticals off-label. Charles Duhigg and David Barboza ( New York Times) investigate Apple's unethical labor practices in China. Max Abelson ( Bloomberg) reports on Wall Street's amusing reaction to the diminishing annual bonus. Mina Kimes ( Fortune) recounts the grisly story of a company's illegal testing -- and misuse -- of a medical device for profit, and Jeff Tietz ( Rolling Stone) composes one of the most poignant and comprehensive portraits of the financial crisis's dissolution of the American middle class.

Just a Journalist

On the Press, Life, and the Spaces Between

Author: Linda Greenhouse

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674980336

Category: Journalistic ethics

Page: 169

View: 7687

A Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter who covered the Supreme Court for The New York Times, Linda Greenhouse trains an autobiographical lens on a moment of transition in U.S. journalism. Calling herself "an accidental activist," she raises urgent questions about the role of journalists as citizens and participants in the world around them.

Bad News

How America 's Business Press Missed the Story of the Century (Large Print 16pt)

Author: Anya Schiffrin

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN: 145960864X

Category: Financial crises

Page: 396

View: 8618

"There are three twenty-four-hour financial networks. All their slogans are like, Ẁe know what's going on on Wall Street.' But then you turn it on during the crisis, and they're like, Ẁe don't know what's going on.' It'd be like turning on the Weather Channel in a hurricane and they're just doing this: [shuddering] Ẁhy am I wet?! What's happening to me? And it's so windy!'" -Jon Stewart.

Out of Print

Newspapers, Journalism and the Business of News in the Digital Age

Author: George Brock

Publisher: Kogan Page

ISBN: 9780749466510

Category: BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

Page: 242

View: 2486

News and journalism are in the midst of upheaval: shifts such as declining print subscriptions and rising website visitor numbers are forcing assumptions and practices to be rethought from first principles. The internet is not simply allowing faster, wider distribution of material: digital technology is demanding transformative change. Out of Print analyzes the role and influence of newspapers in the digital age and explains how current theory and practice have to change to fully exploit developing opportunities.In Out of Print George Brock guides readers through the history, present state and future of journalism, highlighting how and why journalism needs to be rethought on a global scale and remade to meet the demands and opportunities of new conditions. He provides a unique examination of every key issue, from the phone-hacking scandal and Leveson Inquiry to the impact of social media on news and expectations. He presents an incisive, authoritative analysis of the role and influence of journalism in the digital age.

The Watchdog That Didn’t Bark

The Financial Crisis and the Disappearance of Investigative Journalism

Author: Dean Starkman

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231536283

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 368

View: 9386

In this sweeping, incisive post mortem, Dean Starkman exposes the critical shortcomings that softened coverage in the business press during the mortgage era and the years leading up to the financial collapse of 2008. He locates the roots of the problem in the origin of business news as a market messaging service for investors in the early twentieth century. This access-dependent strain of journalism was soon opposed by the grand, sweeping work of the muckrakers. Propelled by the innovations of Bernard Kilgore, the great postwar editor of the Wall Street Journal, these two genres merged when mainstream American news organizations institutionalized muckraking in the 1960s, creating a powerful guardian of the public interest. Yet as the mortgage era dawned, deep cultural and structural shifts—some unavoidable, some self-inflicted—eroded journalism's appetite for its role as watchdog. The result was a deafening silence about systemic corruption in the financial industry. Tragically, this silence grew only more profound as the mortgage madness reached its terrible apogee from 2004 through 2006. Starkman frames his analysis in a broad argument about journalism itself, dividing the profession into two competing approaches—access reporting and accountability reporting—which rely on entirely different sources and produce radically different representations of reality. As Starkman explains, access journalism came to dominate business reporting in the 1990s, a process he calls "CNBCization," and rather than examining risky, even corrupt, corporate behavior, mainstream reporters focused on profiling executives and informing investors. Starkman concludes with a critique of the digital-news ideology and corporate influence, which threaten to further undermine investigative reporting, and he shows how financial coverage, and journalism as a whole, can reclaim its bite.

Follow the Story

How to Write Successful Nonfiction

Author: James B. Stewart

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439127565

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 256

View: 4246

An indispensable guide to nonfiction writing from the Columbia Journalism School professor and Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist behind the bestsellers Blind Eye, Blood Sport, and Den of Thieves. In Follow the Story, bestselling author and journalist James B. Stewart teaches you the techniques of compelling narrative writing, from nonfiction books to articles, feature stories, or memoirs. Stewart provides concrete directions for conceiving, reporting, structuring, and writing nonfiction—techniques that he has used in his own successful books and stories. By using examples from his own work, Stewart illustrates systematically a way of thinking about and executing stories, a method that has helped numerous reporters and Columbia students become better writers. Follow the Story examines in detail: How an idea is conceived How to “sell” ideas to editors and publishers How to report the nonfiction story Six models that can be used for any nonfiction story How to structure the narrative story How to write introductions, endings, dialogue, and description How to introduce and develop characters How to use literary devices Pitfalls to avoid Learn from this book a clear way of looking at the world with the alert curiosity that is the first indispensable step toward good writing.

Can Journalism Survive?

An Inside Look at American Newsrooms

Author: David M. Ryfe

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 074566413X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 230

View: 3460

Journalists have failed to respond adequately to the challenge of the Internet, with far-reaching consequences for the future of journalism and democracy. This is the compelling argument set forth in this timely new text, drawing on the most extensive ethnographic fieldwork in American newsrooms since the 1970s. David Ryfe argues that journalists are unable or unwilling to innovate for a variety of reasons: in part because habits are sticky and difficult to dislodge; in part because of their strategic calculation that the cost of change far exceeds its benefit; and in part because basic definitions of what journalism is, and what it is for, anchor journalism to tradition even when journalists prefer to change. The result is that journalism is unraveling as an integrated social field; it may never again be a separate and separable activity from the broader practice of producing news. One thing is certain: whatever happens next, it will have dramatic consequences for the role journalism plays in democratic society and perhaps will transform its basic meaning and purpose. Can Journalism Survive? is essential and provocative reading for all concerned with the future of journalism and society.

Restless Genius

Barney Kilgore, The Wall Street Journal, and the Invention of Modern Journalism

Author: Richard J. Tofel

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 9781429967112

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 6679

The story of the man who transformed The Wall Street Journal and modern media In 1929, Barney Kilgore, fresh from college in small-town Indiana, took a sleepy, near bankrupt New York financial paper—The Wall Street Journal—and turned it into a thriving national newspaper that eventually was worth $5 billion to Rupert Murdoch. Kilgore then invented a national weekly newspaper that was a precursor of many trends we see playing out in journalism now. Tofel brings this story of a little-known pioneer to life using many previously uncollected newspaper writings by Kilgore and a treasure trove of letters between Kilgore and his father, all of which detail the invention of much of what we like best about modern newspapers. By focusing on the man, his journalism, his foresight, and his business acumen, Restless Genius also sheds new light on the Depression and the New Deal. At a time when traditional newspapers are under increasing threat, Barney Kilgore's story offers lessons that need constant retelling.

The Vanishing Newspaper [2nd Ed]

Saving Journalism in the Information Age

Author: Philip Meyer

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 082621858X

Category: History

Page: 245

View: 1281

"In this edition, Meyer's analysis of the correlation between newspaper quality and profitability is updated and applied to recent developments in the newspaper industry. Meyer argues that understanding the relationship between quality and profit is central to sustaining journalistic excellence and preserving journalism's unique social functions." -- Provided by the publisher.

Coloring the News

How Political Correctness Has Corrupted American Journalism

Author: William McGowan

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781893554603

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 291

View: 7652

Argues that journalists, because of their liberal ideolgies and their fear of offending minority groups, get stories wrong or ignore stories worthy of coverage.

Regret the Error

How Media Mistakes Pollute the Press and Imperil Free Speech

Author: Craig Silverman,Jeff Jarvis

Publisher: Sterling Publishing Company, Inc.

ISBN: 9781402765643

Category: Social Science

Page: 366

View: 8030

Winner of the National Press Club's Arthur Rowse Award for Press Criticism! From Craig Silverman, proprietor of www.RegretTheError.com, comes a lively journey through the history of media mistakes via a chronicle of funny, shocking, and often disturbing journalistic slip-ups. The errors—running the gamut from hilarious to tragic—include “Fuzzy Numbers” (when numbers and math undermine reporting) “Obiticide” (printing the obituary of a living person), and “Unintended Consequences” (typos and misidentifications that create a new, incorrect reality). While some of the errors are laugh-out-loud funny, the book also offers a serious investigation of contemporary journalism's lack of accountability to the public, and a rousing call to arms for all news organizations to mend their ways and reclaim the role of the press as honest voice of the people.

Iphigenia in Forest Hills

Anatomy of a Murder Trial

Author: Janet Malcolm

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780300181708

Category: History

Page: 155

View: 5261

Examines in detail the trial of a young physician who was accused of hiring an assassin to kill her husband in the presence of their 4-year-old daughter and looks at the many issues surrounding events that played out in a court located in a Bukharan-Jewish community in Forest Hills, Queens, New York. By the author of Two Lives: Gertrude and Alice.

Informing the News

Author: Thomas E. Patterson

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0345806611

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 256

View: 3252

As the journalist Walter Lippmann noted nearly a century ago, democracy falters “if there is no steady supply of trustworthy and relevant news.” Today’s journalists are not providing it. Too often, reporters give equal weight to facts and biased opinion, stir up small controversies, and substitute infotainment for real news. Even when they get the facts rights, they often misjudge the context in which they belong. Information is the lifeblood of a healthy democracy. Public opinion and debate suffer when citizens are misinformed about current affairs, as is increasingly the case. Though the failures of today’s communication system cannot be blamed solely on the news media, they are part of the problem, and the best hope for something better. Patterson proposes “knowledge-based journalism” as a corrective. Unless journalists are more deeply informed about the subjects they cover, they will continue to misinterpret them and to be vulnerable to manipulation by their sources. In this book, derived from a multi-year initiative of the Carnegie Corporation and the Knight Foundation, Patterson calls for nothing less than a major overhaul of journalism practice and education. The book speaks not only to journalists but to all who are concerned about the integrity of the information on which America’s democracy depends.