The Story Book of Science

Author: Jean Henri Fabre

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1625581793

Category: Science

Page: 307

View: 7713

Fabre had many scholarly achievements. He was a popular teacher, physicist, chemist, and botanist. However, he is probably best known for his findings in the field of entomology, the study of insects, and is considered by many to be the father of modern entomology. Much of his enduring popularity is due to his marvelous teaching ability and his manner of writing about the lives of insects in biographical form.

The Oxford Book of Science Fiction Stories

Author: Tom Shippey

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780192803818

Category: Fiction

Page: 587

View: 7543

A collection of classic science fiction short stories features tales by H. G. Wells, Arthur C. Clark, Frederik Pohl, Clifford Simak, Brian Aldiss, Ursala K. LeGuin, and many others. Edited by the author of The Road to Middle-Earth. 20,000 first printing.

Proust and the Squid

The Story and Science of the Reading Brain

Author: Maryanne Wolf

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062010638

Category: Science

Page: 336

View: 4138

"Human beings were never born to read," writes Tufts University cognitive neuroscientist and child development expert Maryanne Wolf. Reading is a human invention that reflects how the brain rearranges itself to learn something new. In this ambitious, provocative book, Wolf chronicles the remarkable journey of the reading brain not only over the past five thousand years, since writing began, but also over the course of a single child's life, showing in the process why children with dyslexia have reading difficulties and singular gifts. Lively, erudite, and rich with examples, Proust and the Squid asserts that the brain that examined the tiny clay tablets of the Sumerians was a very different brain from the one that is immersed in today's technology-driven literacy. The potential transformations in this changed reading brain, Wolf argues, have profound implications for every child and for the intellectual development of our species.

Toms River

A Story of Science and Salvation

Author: Dan Fagin

Publisher: Bantam

ISBN: 055380653X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 538

View: 6778

A Newsday investigative reporter presents a narrative account of the 1971 industrial waste dumping incident in Toms River, New Jersey, that led to a cluster of childhood cancers and culminated in decades of legal fights, a record settlement and an unprecedented government study linking pollution to illness. 15,000 first printing.

Whitewash

The Story of a Weed Killer, Cancer, and the Corruption of Science

Author: Carey Gillam

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN: 1610918320

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 320

View: 5909

"Reads like a mystery novel as Gillam skillfully uncovers Monsanto's secretive strategies."—Erin Brockovich "A damning picture...Gillam expertly covers a contentious front." —Publishers Weekly "A must-read." —Booklist "Hard-hitting, eye-opening narrative." —Kirkus It’s the herbicide on our dinner plates, a chemical so pervasive it’s in the air we breathe, our water, our soil, and even found increasingly in our own bodies. Known as Monsanto’s Roundup by consumers, and as glyphosate by scientists, the world’s most popular weed killer is used everywhere from backyard gardens to golf courses to millions of acres of farmland. For decades it’s been touted as safe enough to drink, but a growing body of evidence indicates just the opposite, with research tying the chemical to cancers and a host of other health threats. In Whitewash, veteran journalist Carey Gillam uncovers one of the most controversial stories in the history of food and agriculture, exposing new evidence of corporate influence. Gillam introduces readers to farm families devastated by cancers which they believe are caused by the chemical, and to scientists whose reputations have been smeared for publishing research that contradicted business interests. Readers learn about the arm-twisting of regulators who signed off on the chemical, echoing company assurances of safety even as they permitted higher residues of the herbicide in food and skipped compliance tests. And, in startling detail, Gillam reveals secret industry communications that pull back the curtain on corporate efforts to manipulate public perception. Whitewash is more than an exposé about the hazards of one chemical or even the influence of one company. It’s a story of power, politics, and the deadly consequences of putting corporate interests ahead of public safety.

Crucible of Science

The Story of the Cori Laboratory

Author: John H. Exton

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199861072

Category: Science

Page: 226

View: 400

Examines the careers of Carl and Gerty Cori, and the other eminent scientists who trained in their laboratory

Inferior

How Science Got Women Wrong - and the New Research That's Rewriting the Story

Author: Angela Saini

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807071706

Category: SCIENCE

Page: 213

View: 5364

For hundreds of years it was common sense: women were the inferior sex. Their bodies were weaker, their minds feebler, their role subservient. Science has continued to tell us that men and women are fundamentally different. But a huge wave of research is now revealing that women are as strong, powerful, strategic, and smart as anyone else. Saini takes readers on a journey to uncover science's failure to understand women and to show how women's bodies and minds are finally being rediscovered.

The Wonder Book of Chemistry

Author: Jean-Henri Fabre

Publisher: Blurb

ISBN: 9781389521294

Category: Science

Page: 260

View: 3046

Translated by Florence Constable Bicknell. A wondrous introduction to the world of chemistry, designed specifically for younger readers with the intention of arousing their interest in science. Using everyday objects found around the house or in the local store, this book is set as a storyline in which an "Uncle Paul" teaches his two nephews the secrets behind building an artificial volcano; how to set metals on fire; the flammable properties of water; how to make a fire hotter; how to make soap bubbles rise; how to make invisible ink; the science behind effervescent wines, ciders, and beer; how plants feed on carbon, water, and air-and much more. From the translator's preface: "The personal, biographical interest of the book is not to be overlooked. The boys Jules and Emile are the author's own children; faithfully portrayed even to the names they bear. In his captivating fashion the man of vast learning makes himself at once teacher and comrade to his young hearers, and we learn that 'his chemistry lessons especially had a great success.' "With apparatus of his own devising and of the simplest kind he could perform a host of elementary experiments, the apparatus as a rule consisting of the most ordinary materials, such as a common flask or bottle, an old mustard-pot, a tumbler, a goose-quill or a pipe-stem. "A series of astonishing phenomena amazed their wondering eyes. He made them see, touch, taste, handle, and smell, and always 'the hand assisted the word, ' always 'the example accompanied the precept, ' for no one more fully valued the profound maxim, so neglected and misunderstood, that 'to see is to know.' "Though living creatures necessarily claimed the naturalist's first affections, he nonetheless 'animates even the simple elementary bodies, celebrating the marvelous activities of the air, the violence of chlorin, the metamorphoses of carbon, the miraculous bridals of phosphorus, ' and the 'splendors which accompany the birth of a drop of water.'"

Women in Science

50 Fearless Pioneers who Changed the World

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1607749769

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 127

View: 8231

A charmingly illustrated gift book profiling 50 famous women scientists from the ancient Greek mathematician, philosopher, and astronomer, Hypatia, to Marie Curie, a physicist and chemist.

The Story of Western Science: From the Writings of Aristotle to the Big Bang Theory

Author: Susan Wise Bauer

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393243273

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 4219

A riveting road map to the development of modern scientific thought. In the tradition of her perennial bestseller The Well-Educated Mind, Susan Wise Bauer delivers an accessible, entertaining, and illuminating springboard into the scientific education you never had. Far too often, public discussion of science is carried out by journalists, voters, and politicians who have received their science secondhand. The Story of Western Science shows us the joy and importance of reading groundbreaking science writing for ourselves and guides us back to the masterpieces that have changed the way we think about our world, our cosmos, and ourselves. Able to be referenced individually, or read together as the narrative of Western scientific development, the book's twenty-eight succinct chapters lead readers from the first science texts by Hippocrates, Plato, and Aristotle through twentieth-century classics in biology, physics, and cosmology. The Story of Western Science illuminates everything from mankind's earliest inquiries to the butterfly effect, from the birth of the scientific method to the rise of earth science and the flowering of modern biology. Each chapter recommends one or more classic books and provides entertaining accounts of crucial contributions to science, vivid sketches of the scientist-writers, and clear explanations of the mechanics underlying each concept. The Story of Western Science reveals science to be a dramatic undertaking practiced by some of history's most memorable characters. It reminds us that scientific inquiry is a human pursuit—an essential, often deeply personal, sometimes flawed, frequently brilliant way of understanding the world. The Story of Western Science is an "entertaining and unique synthesis" (Times Higher Education), a "fluidly written" narrative that "celebrates the inexorable force of human curiosity" (Wall Street Journal), and a "bright, informative resource for readers seeking to understand science through the eyes of the men and women who shaped its history" (Kirkus). Previously published as The Story of Science.

The Book of Why

The New Science of Cause and Effect

Author: Judea Pearl,Dana Mackenzie

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465097618

Category: Computers

Page: 432

View: 5639

A Turing Award-winning computer scientist and statistician shows how understanding causality has revolutionized science and will revolutionize artificial intelligence "Correlation is not causation." This mantra, chanted by scientists for more than a century, has led to a virtual prohibition on causal talk. Today, that taboo is dead. The causal revolution, instigated by Judea Pearl and his colleagues, has cut through a century of confusion and established causality--the study of cause and effect--on a firm scientific basis. His work explains how we can know easy things, like whether it was rain or a sprinkler that made a sidewalk wet; and how to answer hard questions, like whether a drug cured an illness. Pearl's work enables us to know not just whether one thing causes another: it lets us explore the world that is and the worlds that could have been. It shows us the essence of human thought and key to artificial intelligence. Anyone who wants to understand either needs The Book of Why.

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

50th Anniversary Edition

Author: Thomas S. Kuhn

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226458148

Category: Science

Page: 264

View: 3002

A good book may have the power to change the way we see the world, but a great book actually becomes part of our daily consciousness, pervading our thinking to the point that we take it for granted, and we forget how provocative and challenging its ideas once were—and still are. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions is that kind of book. When it was first published in 1962, it was a landmark event in the history and philosophy of science. Fifty years later, it still has many lessons to teach. With The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Kuhn challenged long-standing linear notions of scientific progress, arguing that transformative ideas don’t arise from the day-to-day, gradual process of experimentation and data accumulation but that the revolutions in science, those breakthrough moments that disrupt accepted thinking and offer unanticipated ideas, occur outside of “normal science,” as he called it. Though Kuhn was writing when physics ruled the sciences, his ideas on how scientific revolutions bring order to the anomalies that amass over time in research experiments are still instructive in our biotech age. This new edition of Kuhn’s essential work in the history of science includes an insightful introduction by Ian Hacking, which clarifies terms popularized by Kuhn, including paradigm and incommensurability, and applies Kuhn’s ideas to the science of today. Usefully keyed to the separate sections of the book, Hacking’s introduction provides important background information as well as a contemporary context. Newly designed, with an expanded index, this edition will be eagerly welcomed by the next generation of readers seeking to understand the history of our perspectives on science.

The Greatest Science Stories Never Told

100 tales of invention and discovery to astonish, bewilder, and stupefy

Author: Rick Beyer

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0061626961

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 8360

100 tales of invention and discovery to astonish, bewilder, & stupefy Meet the angry undertaker who gave us the push-button phone. Discover how modesty led to the invention of the stethoscope. Find out why Albert Einstein patented a refrigerator. Learn how a train full of trumpeters made science history. Did you know about: The frustrated fashion designer who created the space suit? The gun-toting newspaperman who invented the parking meter? The midnight dreams that led to a Nobel Prize? They're so good, you can't read just one!

Lab Girl

Author: Hope Jahren

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1101874945

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 5531

Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography A New York Times 2016 Notable Book National Best Seller Named one of TIME magazine’s "100 Most Influential People" An Amazon Top 20 Best Book of 2016 A Washington Post Best Memoir of 2016 A TIME and Entertainment Weekly Best Book of 2016 An illuminating debut memoir of a woman in science; a moving portrait of a longtime friendship; and a stunningly fresh look at plants that will forever change how you see the natural world Acclaimed scientist Hope Jahren has built three laboratories in which she’s studied trees, flowers, seeds, and soil. Her first book is a revelatory treatise on plant life—but it is also so much more. Lab Girl is a book about work, love, and the mountains that can be moved when those two things come together. It is told through Jahren’s remarkable stories: about her childhood in rural Minnesota with an uncompromising mother and a father who encouraged hours of play in his classroom’s labs; about how she found a sanctuary in science, and learned to perform lab work done “with both the heart and the hands”; and about the inevitable disappointments, but also the triumphs and exhilarating discoveries, of scientific work. Yet at the core of this book is the story of a relationship Jahren forged with a brilliant, wounded man named Bill, who becomes her lab partner and best friend. Their sometimes rogue adventures in science take them from the Midwest across the United States and back again, over the Atlantic to the ever-light skies of the North Pole and to tropical Hawaii, where she and her lab currently make their home. Jahren’s probing look at plants, her astonishing tenacity of spirit, and her acute insights on nature enliven every page of this extraordinary book. Lab Girl opens your eyes to the beautiful, sophisticated mechanisms within every leaf, blade of grass, and flower petal. Here is an eloquent demonstration of what can happen when you find the stamina, passion, and sense of sacrifice needed to make a life out of what you truly love, as you discover along the way the person you were meant to be.

The Story of Science

Einstein Adds a New Dimension

Author: Joy Hakim

Publisher: Smithsonian Inst Press

ISBN: 9781588341624

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 468

View: 4672

Take a journey through time with an author who understands the politics, intrigue, and human nature of science inquiry. Be prepared to spend hours of delightful reading learning about everything you wanted to know about the quantum world, physics, and relativity.

The Science of Story

Brand Is a Reflection of Culture

Author: Adam Fridman,Hank Ostholthoff

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780999876503

Category: Branding (Marketing)

Page: 222

View: 649

When you think about an impactful story, what comes to mind? Is it a novel on a rainy afternoon, or a magical fairytale to your imaginative children before bed? Can you think of a story you were told along your path and how it has shaped your perception or values still to this moment? The reality is that we tell stories everyday. They are the vehicles of soulful information. They emotionalize the information and create connection. They show our commonalities, humanity, and identify our shared beliefs. Ultimately guiding how we conduct ourselves in every interaction and decision. The Science of Story is the field guide for every business leader, marketer, HR professional, and every individual that is looking to transform and grow their organization. Not only are these conversations impactful to businesses of any size or industry, but they have also guided the subsequent research that followed. Learn more about how to take your career or company to the next level with this modern handbook full of ways to implement best practices from top business leaders across the globe. From behind the scenes purpose transformations to practical examples and everything in between, this book uncovers what it takes to build a purpose-driven, enlightened workforce.