The Splintered Empires

The Eastern Front 1917–21

Author: Prit Buttar

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472819861

Category: History

Page: 488

View: 8779

At the beginning of 1917, the three empires fighting on the Eastern Front were reaching their breaking points, but none was closer than Russia. After the February Revolution, Russia's ability to wage war faltered and her last desperate gamble, the Kerensky Offensive, saw the final collapse of her army. This helped trigger the Bolshevik Revolution and a crippling peace, but the Central Powers had no opportunity to exploit their gains and, a year later, both the German and Austro-Hungarian empires surrendered and disintegrated. Concluding his acclaimed series on the Eastern Front in World War I, Prit Buttar comprehensively details not only these climactic events, but also the 'successor wars' that raged long after the armistice of 1918. New states rose from the ashes of empire, and war raged as German forces sought to keep them under the aegis of the Fatherland. These unresolved tensions between the former Great Powers and the new states would ultimately lead to the rise of Hitler and a new, terrible world war only two decades later.

Collision of Empires

The War on the Eastern Front in 1914

Author: Prit Buttar

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 178200971X

Category: History

Page: 488

View: 9474

Although the myriad of alliances and suspicions that existed between the Russian, German, and Austro-Hungarian empires in the early 20th century proved to be one of the primary triggers for the outbreak of the First World War, much of the actual fighting between these three nations has been largely forgotten in the West. Whilst battles such as Ypres, the Somme, and Passchendaele have been inscribed deeply on the public consciousness, with the exception of perhaps Tannenberg, the conflicts in the East do not hold the same recognition. In his new book, Prit Buttar seeks to correct this imbalance with a magisterial account of the chaos and destruction that reigned when three powerful empires collided. His harrowing narrative is driven by first-hand accounts and new, detailed archival research to create a dynamic retelling of the tumultuous events of the first year of the war, examining the battles of the Masurian Lakes and Tannenberg in East Prussia, followed by the Russo-Austrian clashes in Galicia, the failed German advance towards Warsaw, and the vicious fighting in the Carpathian mountains. Buttar reveals how delays in adapting to a modern war and inadequacies in supply and support arrangements, combined with a failure to plan for a long war, left the Central Powers struggling to keep up with events, and having to come to terms with the dreaded reality of a war on two fronts while Russia was driven towards revolution. A war that was initially seen by all three powers as a welcome opportunity to address both internal and external issues would ultimately bring about the downfall of them all.

Battleground Prussia

The Assault on Germany's Eastern Front 1944–45

Author: Prit Buttar

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 178096465X

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 417

The terrible months between the arrival of the Red Army on German soil and the final collapse of Hitler's regime were like no other in the Second World War. The Soviet Army's intent to take revenge for the horror that the Nazis had wreaked on their people produced a conflict of implacable brutality in which millions perished. From the great battles that marked the Soviet conquest of East and West Prussia to the final surrender in the Vistula estuary, this book recounts in chilling detail the desperate struggle of soldiers and civilians alike. These brutal campaigns are brought vividly to life by a combination of previously untold testimony and astute strategic analysis recognising a conflict of unprecedented horror and suffering.

Russia's Last Gasp

The Eastern Front 1916Â?17

Author: Prit Buttar

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472812786

Category: History

Page: 488

View: 1073

In Russia's Last Gasp, Prit Buttar looks at one of the bloodiest campaigns launched in the history of warfare Â? the Brusilov Offensive, sometimes known as the June Advance. The assault was intended to ease the pressure on Russia's British and French allies by diverting German troops from the Western Front and knocking Austria-Hungary out of the war. Russia's dismal military performance in the preceding years was forgotten, as the Brusilov Offensive was quickly characterised by innovative tactics, including the use of shock troops, a strategy that German armies would later adapt to great effect. Drawing on first-hand accounts and detailed archival research, this is a dramatic retelling of the final years of the war on the Eastern Front, in which the Russian Army claimed military success but at a terrible cost.

Germany Ascendant

The Eastern Front 1915

Author: Prit Buttar

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472813553

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 1806

The massive offensives on the Eastern Front during 1915 are often overshadowed by the events in Western Europe, but the scale and ferocity of the clashes between Imperial Germany, Hapsburg Austria-Hungary and Tsarist Russia were greater than anything seen on the Western Front and ultimately as important to the final outcome of the war. Now, with the work of internationally renowned Eastern Front expert Prit Buttar, this story of the unknown side of World War I is finally being told. In Germany Ascendant, Buttar examines the critical events of 1915, as the German GorliceÂ?Tarnow Offensive triggered the collapse of Russian forces, coming tantalizingly close to knocking Russia out of the war altogether. Throughout the year, German dominance on the Eastern Front grew Â? but stubborn Russian resistance forced the continuation of a two-front war that would drain Germany's reserves of men and equipment. Packed with first-hand accounts and incredible new information, this is a staggeringly ambitious history of some of the most important moments of World War I.

The Eastern Front 1914-1917

Author: Norman Stone

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141938854

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 821

'Without question one of the classics of post-war historical scholarship, Stone's boldly conceived and brilliantly executed book opened the eyes of a generation of young British historians raised on tales of the Western trenches to the crucial importance of the Eastern Front in the First World War' Niall Ferguson 'Scholarly, lucid, entertaining, based on a thorough knowledge of Austrian and Russian sources, it sharply revises traditional assumptions about the First World War.' Michael Howard

On a Knife's Edge

The Ukraine, November 1942–March 1943

Author: Prit Buttar

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472828356

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 5880

Late in 1942, the situation on the Eastern Front underwent a swift and sudden change. Trapped in the ruins of a devastated city, Friedrich von Paulus' Sixth Army faced the prospect of death or imprisonment at the hands of Soviet forces. With such a significant proportion of the Wehrmacht's combat forces isolated in Stalingrad, the German position looked ready to crumble, whilst the powerful Soviet counteroffensive threatened to bring about the collapse of the entire Front. Yet, in a startling recovery led by one of the Wehrmacht's greatest commanders, Erich von Manstein, the German front line was rebuilt, and the weaknesses of the Red Army were revealed under the pressure of an impressively mobile campaign, which played strongly to German strengths. Written by one of the world's leading experts on the Eastern Front, On a Knife's Edge is a story of brilliant generalship, lost opportunities and survival in the harshest theatre of war.

Other First World War

The Blood-Soaked Eastern Front

Author: Douglas Boyd

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 0750957867

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 3824

A challenge to the conventional Western Front bias of World War I history, a must-have for any war historianUnlike the stalemate of the trenches in Flanders, the little-known eastern front of World War I was a war of movement that caused 12 million casualties, including female combatants. It spanned thousands of miles, from the Baltic to the Black and Caspian seas, before spreading north to the Arctic and east to the Pacific, embroiling several thousand British Empire and U.S. soldiers in secret operations in the far North, Siberia, and Ukraine. After the war, Britain and France rebuilt themselves and the U.S. was unaffected. In the east, this savage conflict of atrocities destroyed all the belligerents: the German, Austro-Hungarian, Ottoman, and Russian empires. Berlin ended the eastern front hostilities prematurely at Brest-Litovsk, having covertly financed and promoted the Bolshevik Revolution. This unleashed a "rainbow of death" with the Red Army using famine, poison gas, and concentration camps against the Green, Blue, and Black armies. This remarkable story of war and attrition is brought to life by personal accounts from all sides.

Case Red

The Collapse of France

Author: Robert Forczyk

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 147282444X

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 4014

Even after the legendary evacuation from Dunkirk in June 1940 there were still large British formations fighting the Germans alongside their French allies. After mounting a vigorous counterattack at Abbeville and then conducting a tough defence along the Somme, the British were forced to conduct a second evacuation from the ports of Le Havre, Cherbourg, Brest and St Nazaire. While France was in its death throes, politicians and soldiers debated what to do – flee to England or North Africa, or to seek an armistice. Case Red captures the drama of the final three weeks of military operations in France in June 1940, and explains the great impact it had on the course of relations between Britain and France during the remainder of the war. It also addresses the military, political and human drama of France's collapse in June 1940, and how the windfall of captured military equipment, fuel and industrial resources enhanced the Third Reich's ability to attack its next foe – the Soviet Union.

Between Giants

Author: Prit Buttar

Publisher: Ottawa

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 810

With the exception of Poland, no region or territory suffered more greatly during World War II than the Baltic States. Caught between the giants of the Soviet Union and the Third Reich, Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia became pawns in the desperate battle for control of Eastern Europe throughout the course of World War II. This is a story of conquest and exploitation, of death and deportation and the fight for survival both by countries and individuals. The three states were repeatedly occupied -- by the Soviet Union in 1939, by Germany in 1941, and again by the Soviet Union in 1944-45. In each case, local government organizations and individuals were forced to choose between supporting the occupying forces or forming partisan units. Many would be caught up in the bitter fighting in the region and, in particular, in the huge battles for the Courland bridgehead during Operation Bagration when hundreds of thousands of soldiers would fight and die in the last year of the war....

The White War

Life and Death on the Italian Front 1915-1919

Author: Mark Thompson

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0786744383

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 728

In May 1915, Italy declared war on the Habsburg Empire. Nearly 750,000 Italian troops were killed in savage, hopeless fighting on the stony hills north of Trieste and in the snows of the Dolomites. To maintain discipline, General Luigi Cadorna restored the Roman practice of decimation, executing random members of units that retreated or rebelled. With elegance and pathos, historian Mark Thompson relates the saga of the Italian front, the nationalist frenzy and political intrigues that preceded the conflict, and the towering personalities of the statesmen, generals, and writers drawn into the heart of the chaos. A work of epic scale, The White War does full justice to the brutal and heart-wrenching war that inspired Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms.

Instrument of War

The German Army 1914–18

Author: Dennis Showalter

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472813014

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 3623

Drawing on more than a half-century of research and teaching, Dennis Showalter presents a fresh perspective on the German Army during World War I. Showalter surveys an army at the heart of a national identity, driven by – yet also defeated by – warfare in the modern age, which struggled to capitalize on its victories and ultimately forgot the lessons of its defeat. Exploring the internal dynamics of the German Army and detailing how the soldiers coped with the many new forms of warfare, Showalter shows how the army's institutions responded to, and how Germany itself was changed by war. Detailing the major campaigns on the Western and Eastern fronts and the forgotten war fought in the Middle East and Africa, this comprehensive volume, now publishing in paperback, examines the army's operational strategy, the complexities of campaigns of movement versus static trench warfare, and the effects of changes in warfare.

So Close to Home: A True Story of an American Family's Fight for Survival During World War II

Author: Michael J. Tougias,Alison O'Leary

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 1681771713

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 6955

A true story of men and women pitted against the sea during World War II—and an unforgettable portrait of the determination of the human spirit. On May 19, 1942, a U-boat in the Gulf of Mexico stalked its prey fifty miles from New Orleans. Captained by twenty nine-year-old Iron Cross and King's Cross recipient Erich Wu¨rdemann, the submarine set its sights on the freighter Heredia with sixty-two souls on board. Most aboard were merchant seamen, but there were also a handful of civilians, including the Downs family: Ray and Ina, and their two children, eight-year-old Sonny and eleven-year-old Lucille. Fast asleep in their berths, the Downs family had no idea that two torpedoes were heading their way. When the ship exploded, chaos ensued—and each family member had to find their own path to survival. Including original, unpublished material from Commander Wu¨rdemann’s war diary, the story provides balance and perspective by chronicling the daring mission of the U-boat—and its commander’s decision-making—in the Gulf of Mexico. An inspiring historical narrative, So Close to Home tells the story of the Downs family as they struggle against sharks, hypothermia, drowning, and dehydration in their effort to survive the aftermath of this deadly attack off the American coast.

The Butcher's Trail

How the Search for Balkan War Criminals Became the World's Most Successful Manhunt

Author: Julian Borger

Publisher: Other Press, LLC

ISBN: 1590516052

Category: Political Science

Page: 400

View: 4296

Written with a thrilling narrative pull, The Butcher's Trail chronicles the pursuit and capture of the Balkan war criminals indicted by the International Criminal Tribunal in The Hague. Borger recounts how Radovan Karadzic and Ratko Mladic - both now on trial in The Hague - were finally tracked down, and describes the intrigue behind the arrest of Slobodan Milosevic, the Yugoslav president who became the first head of state to stand before an international tribunal for crimes perpetrated in a time of war.

Shattering Empires

The Clash and Collapse of the Ottoman and Russian Empires 1908–1918

Author: Michael A. Reynolds

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139494120

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 9884

The break-up of the Ottoman empire and the disintegration of the Russian empire were watershed events in modern history. The unravelling of these empires was both cause and consequence of World War I and resulted in the deaths of millions. It irrevocably changed the landscape of the Middle East and Eurasia and reverberates to this day in conflicts throughout the Caucasus and Middle East. Shattering Empires draws on extensive research in the Ottoman and Russian archives to tell the story of the rivalry and collapse of two great empires. Overturning accounts that portray their clash as one of conflicting nationalisms, this pioneering study argues that geopolitical competition and the emergence of a new global interstate order provide the key to understanding the course of history in the Ottoman-Russian borderlands in the twentieth century. It will appeal to those interested in Middle Eastern, Russian, and Eurasian history, international relations, ethnic conflict, and World War I.

Death of the USS Thresher

The Story Behind History's Deadliest Submarine Disaster

Author: Norman Polmar

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0762766131

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 1845

On the morning of April 10, 1963, the world's most advanced submarine was on a test dive off the New England coast when she sent a message to a support ship a thousand feet above her on the surface: experiencing minor problem . . . have positive angle . . . attempting to blow . . . Then came the sounds of air under pressure and a garbled message: . . . test depth . . . Last came the eerie sounds that experienced navy men knew from World War II: the sounds of a submarine breaking up and compartments collapsing.When she first went to sea in April of 1961, the U.S. nuclear submarine Thresher was the most advanced submarine at sea, built specifically to hunt and kill Soviet submarines. In The Death of the USS Thresher, renowned naval and intelligence consultant Norman Polmar recounts the dramatic circumstances surrounding her implosion, which killed all 129 men on board, in history's first loss of a nuclear submarine. This revised edition of Polmar's 1964 classic is based on interviews with the Thresher's first command officer, other submarine officers, and the designers of the submarine. Polmar provides recently declassified information about the submarine, and relates the loss to subsequent U.S. and Soviet nuclear submarine sinkings, as well as to the escape and rescue systems developed by the Navy in the aftermath of the disaster. The Death of the USS Thresher is a must-read for the legions of fans who enjoyed the late Peter Maas's New York Times best-seller The Terrible Hours.

Fall of the Double Eagle

The Battle for Galicia and the Demise of Austria-Hungary

Author: John R. Schindler

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 1612347657

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 8209

"Examination of the Battle for Galicia (23 August-11 September 1914), the most historically and strategically consequential of the Great War's three opening campaigns"--

Human Smoke

The Beginnings of World War II, the End of Civilization

Author: Nicholson Baker

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416572465

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 5364

A study of the decades leading up to World War II profiles the world leaders, politicians, business people, and others whose personal politics and ideologies provided an inevitable barrier to the peace process and whose actions led to the outbreak of war.

Serbia and the Balkan Front, 1914

The Outbreak of the Great War

Author: James Lyon

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472580052

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 2762

Winner of the 2015 Norman B. Tomlinson, Jr. Book Prize Serbia and the Balkan Front, 1914 is the first history of the Great War to address in-depth the crucial events of 1914 as they played out on the Balkan Front. James Lyon demonstrates how blame for the war's outbreak can be placed squarely on Austria-Hungary's expansionist plans and internal political tensions, Serbian nationalism, South Slav aspirations, the unresolved Eastern Question, and a political assassination sponsored by renegade elements within Serbia's security services. In doing so, he portrays the background and events of the Sarajevo Assassination and the subsequent military campaigns and diplomacy on the Balkan Front during 1914. The book details the first battle of the First World War, the first Allied victory and the massive military humiliations Austria-Hungary suffered at the hands of tiny Serbia, while discussing the oversized strategic role Serbia played for the Allies during 1914. Lyon challenges existing historiography that contends the Habsburg Army was ill-prepared for war and shows that the Dual Monarchy was in fact superior in manpower and technology to the Serbian Army, thus laying blame on Austria-Hungary's military leadership rather than on its state of readiness. Based on archival sources from Belgrade, Sarajevo and Vienna and using never-before-seen material to discuss secret negotiations between Turkey and Belgrade to carve up Albania, Serbia's desertion epidemic, its near-surrender to Austria-Hungary in November 1914, and how Serbia became the first belligerent to openly proclaim its war aims, Serbia and the Balkan Front, 1914 enriches our understanding of the outbreak of the war and Serbia's role in modern Europe. It is of great importance to students and scholars of the history of the First World War as well as military, diplomatic and modern European history.