Kamehameha

The Rise of a King

Author: David Eyre

Publisher: Kamehameha Schools Press

ISBN: 9780873363228

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 224

View: 9168

"A work of historical fiction based on Hawaiian sources and years of research. The stories shed new light on Kamehameha's upbringing and his lifelong quest to unify the Hawaiian Islands"--Jacket.

The Rise of a King

Author: DeWitt C. Tremaine

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781420846652

Category: Fiction

Page: 500

View: 8023

Follow along as the author relates his experiences from the time he enlists in the Army Air Force in 1942, thru training as an Aviation Cadet and finally as the pilot-in-command of a B-17 Flying Fortress as the 8th Air Force mounts its attack against Hitler's Germany. Enjoy moments of humor, live incidents of aviation suspense and feel the sorrow of tragic times.

The Rise of a King

Kamehameha Set

Author: David Kawika Eyre,Imaikalani Kalahele

Publisher: Kamehameha Schools Press

ISBN: 9780873362245

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 202

View: 388


A Gangster's Revenge 3

The Rise of a King

Author: Aryanna

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781948878326

Category: Fiction

Page: 198

View: 4979

A GANGSTER'S REVENGE 3 gives you the old and the new with loyalty and life being the things up for grabs. Along the way many shall perish as they contest THE RISE OF A KING.

Against All Odds

Rise of a King

Author: Lionel Lindsey

Publisher: Lionel Lindsey/43952 Entertainment

ISBN: 9780692469156

Category:

Page: 298

View: 768

Against All Odds: Rise of A king gives a riveting account of Linz and his crew the 4 kings as they navigate their way thru the merciless streets of Pittsburgh, Pa. As they attempt to rise to the top and be seated amongst the steel city's elite players in the game. Although the love of money & it's evil twin power is evident, it's the strong desire of revenge that truly motivates them.

King of the World

Muhammed Ali and the Rise of an American Hero

Author: David Remnick

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0804173621

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 5005

With an Introduction by Salman Rushdie On the night in 1964 that Muhammad Ali (then known as Cassius Clay) stepped into the ring with Sonny Liston, he was widely regarded as an irritating freak who danced and talked way too much. Six rounds later Ali was not only the new world heavyweight boxing champion: He was "a new kind of black man" who would shortly transform America's racial politics, its popular culture, and its notions of heroism. No one has captured Ali--and the era that he exhilarated and sometimes infuriated--with greater vibrancy, drama, and astuteness than David Remnick, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Lenin's Tomb (and editor of The New Yorker). In charting Ali's rise from the gyms of Louisville, Kentucky, to his epochal fights against Liston and Floyd Patterson, Remnick creates a canvas of unparalleled richness. He gives us empathetic portraits of wisecracking sportswriters and bone-breaking mobsters; of the baleful Liston and the haunted Patterson; of an audacious Norman Mailer and an enigmatic Malcolm X. Most of all, King of the World does justice to the speed, grace, courage, humor, and ebullience of one of the greatest athletes and irresistibly dynamic personalities of our time. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Dancing with the King

The Rise and Fall of the King Country, 1864–1885

Author: Michael Belgrave

Publisher: Auckland University Press

ISBN: 1775589390

Category: History

Page: 436

View: 8781

After the battle of Orakau in 1864 and the end of the war in the Waikato, Tawhiao, the second Maori King, and his supporters were forced into an armed isolation in the Rohe Potae, the King Country. For the next twenty years, the King Country operated as an independent state – a land governed by the Maori King where settlers and the Crown entered at risk of their lives. Dancing with the King is the story of the King Country when it was the King's country, and of the negotiations between the King and the Queen that finally opened the area to European settlement. For twenty years, the King and the Queen's representatives engaged in a dance of diplomacy involving gamesmanship, conspiracy, pageantry and hard headed politics, with the occasional act of violence or threat of it. While the Crown refused to acknowledge the King's legitimacy, the colonial government and the settlers were forced to treat Tawhiao as a King, to negotiate with him as the ruler and representative of a sovereign state, and to accord him the respect and formality that this involved. Colonial negotiators even made Tawhiao offers of settlement that came very close to recognising his sovereign authority. Dancing with the King is a riveting account of a key moment in New Zealand history as an extraordinary cast of characters – Tawhiao and Rewi Maniapoto, Donald McLean and George Grey – negotiated the role of the King and the Queen, of Maori and Pakeha, in New Zealand.

Midwifery, Obstetrics and the Rise of Gynaecology

The Uses of a Sixteenth-Century Compendium

Author: Helen King

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351917684

Category: History

Page: 238

View: 9749

The Gynaeciorum libri, the 'Books on [the diseases of] women,' a compendium of ancient and contemporary texts on gynaecology, is the inspiration for this intensive exploration of the origins of a subfield of medicine. This collection was first published in 1566, with a second edition in 1586/8 and a third, running to 1097 folio pages, in 1597. While examining the origins of the compendium, Helen King here concentrates on its reception, looking at a range of different uses of the book in the history of medicine from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century. Looking at the competition and collaboration among different groups of men involved in childbirth, and between men and women, she demonstrates that arguments about history were as important as arguments about the merits of different designs of forceps. She focuses on the eighteenth century, when the 'man-midwife' William Smellie found his competence to practise challenged on the grounds of his allegedly inadequate grasp of the history of medicine. In his lectures, Smellie remade the 'father of medicine', Hippocrates, as the 'father of midwifery'. The close study of these texts results in a fresh perspective on Thomas Laqueur's model of the defeat of the one-sex body in the eighteenth century, and on the origins of gynaecology more generally. King argues that there were three occasions in the history of western medicine on which it was claimed that women's difference from men was so extensive that they required a separate branch of medicine: the fifth century BC, and the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries. By looking at all three occasions together, and by tracing the links not only between ancient Greek ideas and their Renaissance rediscovery, but also between the Renaissance compendium and its later owners, King analyzes how the claim of female 'difference' was shaped by specific social and cultural conditions. Midwifery, Obstetrics and the Rise of Gynaecology makes a genuine contribution not only to the history of medicine and its subfield of gynaecology, but also to gender and cultural studies.

The Once and Future King

The Rise of Crown Government in America

Author: F. H. Buckley

Publisher: Encounter Books

ISBN: 1594037949

Category: Political Science

Page: 416

View: 334

This remarkable book shatters just about every myth surrounding American government, the Constitution, and the Founding Fathers, and offers the clearest warning about the alarming rise of one-man rule in the age of Obama. Most Americans believe that this country uniquely protects liberty, that it does so because of its Constitution, and that for this our thanks must go to the Founders, at their Convention in Philadelphia in 1787. F. H. Buckley’s book debunks all these myths. America isn’t the freest country around, according to the think tanks that study these things. And it’s not the Constitution that made it free, since parliamentary regimes are generally freer than presidential ones. Finally, what we think of as the Constitution, with its separation of powers, was not what the Founders had in mind. What they expected was a country in which Congress would dominate the government, and in which the president would play a much smaller role. Sadly, that’s not the government we have today. What we have instead is what Buckley calls Crown government: the rule of an all-powerful president. The country began in a revolt against one king, and today we see the dawn of a new kind of monarchy. What we have is what Founder George Mason called an “elective monarchy,” which he thought would be worse than the real thing. Much of this is irreversible. Constitutional amendments to redress the balance of power are extremely unlikely, and most Americans seem to have accepted, and even welcomed, Crown government. The way back lies through Congress, and Buckley suggests feasible reforms that it might adopt, to regain the authority and respect it has squandered.

The King's Three Faces

The Rise and Fall of Royal America, 1688-1776

Author: Brendan McConville

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807838861

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 9616

Reinterpreting the first century of American history, Brendan McConville argues that colonial society developed a political culture marked by strong attachment to Great Britain's monarchs. This intense allegiance continued almost until the moment of independence, an event defined by an emotional break with the king. By reading American history forward from the seventeenth century rather than backward from the Revolution, McConville shows that political conflicts long assumed to foreshadow the events of 1776 were in fact fought out by factions who invoked competing visions of the king and appropriated royal rites rather than used abstract republican rights or pro-democratic proclamations. The American Revolution, McConville contends, emerged out of the fissure caused by the unstable mix of affective attachments to the king and a weak imperial government. Sure to provoke debate, The King's Three Faces offers a powerful counterthesis to dominant American historiography.

The Rise and Fall of the Sugar King

A History of Williamsburg, Brooklyn 1844-1909

Author: Geoffrey Owen Cobb

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781978415461

Category:

Page: 350

View: 2156

The history of Williamsburg, Brooklyn and the rise of the American sugar industry are so intertwined that it is impossible to separate them. The Havemeyer family built the world's largest sugar refinery that would be renamed Domino, but also constructed a sugar empire that made Henry Havemeyer one of the richest and most powerful men in America. This book chronicles Henry Havemeyer's ascent and reign as the "Sugar King" of the United States. It is a tale of greed, crime, wealth, power and corruption, but it is also the story of Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The Rise and Fall of the Sugar King, based on extensive historical research, recounts the lives of a half dozen Williamsburg residents during the years from 1844 to 1909.

The Rise and Fall of a Dragon King

Author: Lynn Abbey

Publisher: Wizards of the Coast

ISBN: 9780786904761

Category: Fantasy games

Page: 310

View: 6075

The much-feared sorcerer-king of Urik, Hamanu joins a plot to force a transmutation that will allow him to avoid his own corruption but that will destroy all of Urik in the process. Original. 65,000 first printing.

Once a King, Always a King

The Unmaking of a Latin King

Author: Reymundo Sanchez

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 156976235X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 6108

This riveting sequel to "My Bloody Life" traces Reymundo Sanchez's struggle to create a "normal" life outside the Latin Kings, one of the nation's most notorious street gangs, and to move beyond his past. Sanchez illustrates how the Latin King motto "once a king, always a king" rings true and details the difficulty and danger of leaving that life behind. Filled with heart-pounding scenes of his backslide into drugs, sex, and violence, Once a King, Always a King recounts how Sanchez wound up behind bars and provides an engrossing firsthand account of how the Latin Kings are run from inside the prison system. Harrowing testaments to Sanchez's determination to rebuild his life include his efforts to separate his family from gang life and his struggle to adapt to marriage and the corporate world. Despite temptations, nightmares, regressions into violence, and his own internal demons, Sanchez makes an uneasy peace with his new life. This raw, powerful, and brutally honest memoir traces the transformation of an accomplished gangbanger into a responsible citizen.

King Energy

The Rise and Fall of an Industrial Empire Gone Awry

Author: Bruce Raphael

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 059500427X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 728

View: 9846

The modern energy industry grew out of the rubble of the Middle Ages and the American Civil War. It quickly grew into a bewildering assemblage not only of mines, fields, pipelines, utilities and their overlapping directorates but of public and private policies and intrigues throughout the world, one broad enough in scale to rival the most powerful democracies in determining the ultimate fates of nations. Its priorities set the stage for the Cold War and the nuclear arms race. If the industrys rise to power was unexpected by the traditional establishments of nation and state, its crash was equally breathtaking, involving actors and players in unexpected locales and venues, from backyard inventors to the concrete canyons of Wall Street. King Energy is the story of the companies and personalities that defined the 20th Century and set the stage for the economic, political and social agendas leading up to the new millennium.

The Rise of Neoliberalism in Advanced Capitalist Economies

A Materialist Analysis

Author: M. Howard,J.E. King

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 023058392X

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 3889

In this unique and dramatic account of the rise of neoliberalism Howard and King consider the major features of historical materialism, the factors which resulted in 19th and 20th century thinkers incorrectly predicting the long-term decline of the market, and the prospects for a reversal of neoliberalism in the 21st century.

Rise of the King

Companion Codex, II

Author: R.A. Salvatore

Publisher: Wizards of the Coast

ISBN: 0786965517

Category: Fiction

Page: 368

View: 3254

In the second book of the Companions Codex, the latest series in R.A. Salvatore’s New York Times best-selling saga of dark elf Drizzt Do’Urden, the orcs of Many Arrows decide to take advantage of the chaos wrought by the Sundering to reignite a blood feud first brought to life in the phenomenal best seller The Thousand Orcs.

The Tailor-King

The Rise and Fall of the Anabaptist Kingdom of Muenster

Author: Anthony Arthur

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 142997043X

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 5456

He was only a Dutch tailor's apprentice, but from 1534 to 1535, Jan van Leyden led a radical sect of persecuted Anabaptists to repeated triumphs over the combined powers of church and state. Revered by his followers as the new David, the charismatic young leader pronounced the northern German city of Muenster a new Zion and crowned himself king. He expropriated all private property, took sixteen wives (supposedly emulating the biblical patriarchs), and in a deadly reign of terror, executed all who opposed him. As the long siege of Muenster resulted in starvation, thousands fled Jan's deadly kingdom while others waited behind the double walls and moats for the apocalyptic final attack by the Prince-Bishop's hired armies, supported by all the rulers of Europe. With the sudden rise to power of a compelling personality and the resulting violent threat to ordered society, Jan van Leyden's distant story strangely echoes the many tragedies of the twentieth century. More than just a fascinating human drama from the past, The Tailor-King also offers insight into our own troubled times.