The Racial Imaginary

Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind

Author: Claudia Rankine,Beth Loffreda,Max King Cap

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781934200797

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 285

View: 3663

Frank, fearless letters from poets of all colors, genders, classes about the material conditions under which their art is made.

The End of the Alphabet

Poems

Author: Claudia Rankine

Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic

ISBN: 0802198538

Category: Poetry

Page: 113

View: 494

These poems—intrepid, obsessive, and erotic—tell the story of a woman's attempt to overcome despair. Claudia Rankine, whose first collection was the prize-winning Nothing in Nature is Private, creates a transfixing testimonial to a woman facing her own disease. Drawing on voices from Jane Eyre to Lady MacBeth, Rankine welds the cerebral and the spiritual, the sensual and the grotesque, courting paradox into the center of her voice.

Letters to America

Contemporary American Poetry on Race

Author: Jim Daniels

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 9780814325421

Category: Poetry

Page: 230

View: 4572

A collection of poems that explore the issues surrounding race relations in American society, told from the experience of Black, Native American, Asian, Arabic, Hispanic, and white cultures.

Citizen

An American Lyric

Author: Claudia Rankine

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141981784

Category: Poetry

Page: 192

View: 6332

WINNER OF THE LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE FOR POETRY WINNER OF THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FOR POETRY In this moving, critical and fiercely intelligent collection of prose poems, Claudia Rankine examines the experience of race and racism in Western society through sharp vignettes of everyday discrimination and prejudice, and longer meditations on the violence - whether linguistic or physical - which has impacted the lives of Serena Williams, Zinedine Zidane, Mark Duggan and others. Awarded the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry in America after becoming the first book in the prize's history to be a finalist in both the poetry and criticism categories, Citizen weaves essays, images and poetry together to form a powerful testament to the individual and collective effects of racism in an ostensibly "post-race" society.

The White Card

A Play

Author: Claudia Rankine

Publisher: Graywolf Press

ISBN: 155597886X

Category: Drama

Page: 96

View: 7381

A play about the imagined fault line between black and white lives by Claudia Rankine, the author of Citizen The White Card stages a conversation that is both informed and derailed by the black/white American drama. The scenes in this one-act play, for all the characters’ disagreements, stalemates, and seeming impasses, explore what happens if one is willing to stay in the room when it is painful to bear the pressure to listen and the obligation to respond. —from the introduction by Claudia Rankine Claudia Rankine’s first published play, The White Card, poses the essential question: Can American society progress if whiteness remains invisible? Composed of two scenes, the play opens with a dinner party thrown by Virginia and Charles, an influential Manhattan couple, for the up-and-coming artist Charlotte. Their conversation about art and representations of race spirals toward the devastation of Virginia and Charles’s intentions. One year later, the second scene brings Charlotte and Charles into the artist’s studio, and their confrontation raises both the stakes and the questions of what—and who—is actually on display. Rankine’s The White Card is a moving and revelatory distillation of racial divisions as experienced in the white spaces of the living room, the art gallery, the theater, and the imagination itself.

A Sense of Regard

Essays on Poetry and Race

Author: Laura McCullough

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820347612

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 305

View: 1037

"McCullough has collected the voices of living poets and scholars in thoughtful and considered exfoliation of the confluence of poetry and race in our time: the difficulties, the nuances, the unexamined, the feared, the questions, and the quarrels across aesthetic camps and biases. The book brings together essays by a range of writers and academics whose work varies in style from personal accounts and lyrical essays to challenging criticisms. McCullough believes this approach allows for more avenues and angles of exploration on this complex topic. She has also strived to be as inclusive as possible, to reach past the black/white perception of race and offer essays from numerous racial backgrounds. The anthology covers many issues that cross racial and ethnic borders and is divided into sections based on these issues: Americanism, the experience of unsilencing and crossing borders, interrogating whiteness, and language itself"--

The Poetry of the Americas

From Good Neighbors to Countercultures

Author: Harris Feinsod

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190682000

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 416

View: 476

"This book narrates exchanges between English- and Spanish-language poets in the American hemisphere from the late 1930s through the rise of the 1960s. It doing so, it contributes to a crucial current of humanistic inquiry: the effort to write a cosmopolitan literary history adequate to the age of globalization. Building on correspondence and manuscripts from collections in Europe and the Americas, the book first traces the material contours of an evolving literary network that exceeds the conventional model of "the two Americas." These relations depend on changing contexts: an era of state-sponsored transnationalism, from the wartime intensification of Good Neighbor diplomacy, to the Cold War cultural policy programs of the Alliance for Progress in the 1960s; a prosperous market for translations of Latin American poetry in the US; and a growing alternative print sphere of bilingual vanguard journals such as El Corno Emplumado (Mexico City, 1962-1969). As the book articulates these histories of exchange, it also theorizes how poets employ the resources of language to transform popular images of the hemisphere from a locus of political conflict into a venue of supranational cultural citizenship. Feinsod describes how inter-Americanism was enacted through diplomatic structures of literary address, multilingual writing, and appeals to a shared indigenous heritage through the genre of the meditation on ruins. By tracing the coevolution of midcentury poetry with the geopolitics of the hemisphere, the book expands existing literary histories of the period through revelatory comparative readings supported by archival findings"--

Coachella

Author: Sheila Ortiz Taylor

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826318435

Category: Fiction

Page: 187

View: 3656

This desert mystery novel, set in Palm Springs in 1983, is from one of Chicana literature's finest writers.

Break Every Rule

Essays on Language, Longing, & Moments of Desire

Author: Carole Maso

Publisher: Counterpoint Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 191

View: 3364

In this groundbreaking work of ecstatic criticism, Carole Maso shows why she has risen, over the past fifteen years, as one of the brightest stars in the literary firmament. Ever refusing to be marginalized or categorized by genre, Maso is an incisive, compassionate writer who deems herself daughter of William Carlos Williams, a pioneer in combining poetry and fiction with criticism, journalism, and the visual arts. She is daughter, too, of Allen Ginsberg, who also came from Paterson, New Jersey. Known for her audacity, whether exploring language and memory or the development of the artistic soul, Maso here gives us a form-challenging collection, intelligent, and persuasive.

Don't Let Me Be Lonely

An American Lyric

Author: Claudia Rankine

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780141984179

Category:

Page: 192

View: 813

"Here, available for the first time in the UK, is the book in which Claudia Rankine first developed the 'American Lyric' form which makes her Forward Prize-winning collection Citizenso distinctive- an original combination of poetry, lyric essay, photography and visual art, virtuosically deployed. Don't Let Me Be Lonelyis Rankine's meditation on the self bewildered by race riots, terrorism, medicated depression and television's ubiquitous influence. Written during George W. Bush's presidency in an America still reeling from the 9/11 attacks and charging headlong into war in Iraq, this is an early 21st-century work of great wit, intelligence and depth of feeling, with urgent lessons for the present."

On the teaching of creative writing

responses to a series of questions

Author: Wallace Earle Stegner

Publisher: Dartmouth College

ISBN: 9780874518436

Category: Education

Page: 72

View: 3321

A concise, inspirational discourse by one of America's finest writers, on the difficulties, rewards, and importance of teaching creative writing.

All American Boys

Author: Jason Reynolds,Brendan Kiely

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1481463330

Category: JUVENILE FICTION

Page: 316

View: 8245

When sixteen-year-old Rashad is mistakenly accused of stealing, classmate Quinn witnesses his brutal beating at the hands of a police officer who happens to be the older brother of his best friend. Told through Rashad and Quinn's alternating viewpoints.

Kindred

Author: Octavia Butler

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807083704

Category: Fiction

Page: 264

View: 7169

Dana, a modern black woman, is celebrating her twenty-sixth birthday with her new husband when she is snatched abruptly from her home in California and transported to the antebellum South. Rufus, the white son of a plantation owner, is drowning, and Dana has been summoned to save him. Dana is drawn back repeatedly through time to the slave quarters, and each time the stay grows longer, more arduous, and more dangerous until it is uncertain whether or not Dana's life will end, long before it has a chance to begin.

Black Skin, White Masks

Author: Frantz Fanon

Publisher: Pluto Press (UK)

ISBN: 9780745328485

Category: Black race

Page: 186

View: 9578

The explosion will not happen today. It is too soon ... or too late.First published in English in 1968, Frantz Fanon's seminal text was immediately acclaimed as a classic of black liberationalist writing. Fanon's descriptions of the feelings of inadequacy and dependence experienced by people of colour in a white world are as salient and as compelling as ever. Fanon identifies a devastating pathology at the heart of Western culture, a denial of difference, that persists to this day. His writings speak to all who continue the struggle for political and cultural liberation in our troubled times.

Whitewalling: Art, Race & Protest in 3 Acts

Author: Aruna D'Souza

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781943263141

Category: Art

Page: 160

View: 7617

In 2017, the Whitney Biennial included a painting by a white artist, Dana Schutz, of the lynched body of a young black child, Emmett Till. In 1979, anger brewed over a show at New York's Artists Space entitled The Nigger Drawings. In 1969, the Metropolitan Museum of Art's exhibition Harlem on My Mind did not include a single work by a black artist. In all three cases, black artists and writers and their allies organized vigorous responses using the only forum available to them: public protest. Whitewalling: Art, Race & Protest in 3 Acts reflects on these three incidents in the long and troubled history of art and race in America. It lays bare how the art world--no less than the country at large--has persistently struggled with the politics of race, and the ways this struggle has influenced how museums, curators and artists wrestle with notions of free speech and the specter of censorship. Whitewalling takes a critical and intimate look at these three "acts" in the history of the American art scene and asks: when we speak of artistic freedom and the freedom of speech, who, exactly, is free to speak? Aruna D'Souza writes about modern and contemporary art, food and culture; intersectional feminisms and other forms of politics; how museums shape our views of each other and the world; and books. Her work appears regularly in 4Columns.org, where she is a member of the editorial advisory board, as well as in publications including the Wall Street Journal, ARTnews, Garage, Bookforum, Momus and Art Practical. D'Souza is the editor of the forthcoming Making it Modern: A Linda Nochlin Reader.

African Americans and Jungian Psychology

Leaving the Shadows

Author: Fanny Brewster

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 131735186X

Category: Psychology

Page: 136

View: 4717

African Americans and Jungian Psychology: Leaving the Shadows explores the little-known racial relationship between the African diaspora and C.G. Jung’s analytical psychology. In this unique book, Fanny Brewster explores the culture of Jungian psychology in America and its often-difficult relationship with race and racism. Beginning with an examination of how Jungian psychology initially failed to engage African Americans, and continuing to the modern use of the Shadow in language and imagery, Brewster creates space for a much broader discussion regarding race and racism in America. Using Jung’s own words, Brewster establishes a timeline of Jungian perspectives on African Americans from the past to the present. She explores the European roots of analytical psychology and its racial biases, as well as the impact this has on contemporary society. The book also expands our understanding of the negative impact of racism in American psychology, beginning a dialogue and proposing how we might change our thinking and behaviors to create a twenty-first-century Jungian psychology that recognizes an American multicultural psyche and a positive African American culture. African Americans and Jungian Psychology: Leaving the Shadows explores the positive contributions of African culture to Jung’s theories and will be essential reading for analytical psychologists, academics and students of Jungian and post-Jungian studies, African American studies, and American studies.

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

Author: Maya Angelou

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 030747772X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 6441

Sent by their mother to live with their devout, self-sufficient grandmother in a small Southern town, Maya and her brother, Bailey, endure the ache of abandonment and the prejudice of the local “powhitetrash.” At eight years old and back at her mother’s side in St. Louis, Maya is attacked by a man many times her age–and has to live with the consequences for a lifetime. Years later, in San Francisco, Maya learns about love for herself and the kindness of others, her own strong spirit, and the ideas of great authors (“I met and fell in love with William Shakespeare”) will allow her to be free instead of imprisoned. Poetic and powerful, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is a modern American classic that will touch hearts and change minds for as long as people read. From the Paperback edition.

Converging Territories

Author: Lalla Essaydi,Amanda Carlson

Publisher: powerHouse Books

ISBN: 9781576872567

Category: Photography

Page: 32

View: 7100

According to Islamic tradition, men dominate the public sphere and women are expected to remain indoors at most times. In photographer Lalla Essaydi’s native Morocco this confinement has been further used as a punishment for those who transgress the rules of gender conduct. A practice only recently abandoned, women were at times even required to spend periods as long as a month inside otherwise uninhabited homes. In an exploration into her home country and her childhood Essaydi reverses the meaning of these spaces in Converging Territories, using them as a place where women are seen, not hidden. Essaydi’s subjects are given a voice not only through their actions, but also through the written word. The women pose after long sessions during which Essaydi covers their clothing and few areas of exposed skin, as well as the rooms themselves, with Islamic calligraphy. The rebelliousness of this act is added to by the fact that the words are drawn with henna—a form of adornment considered “women’s work.” In a seeming contrast, the calligraphy used is a sacred Islamic art form that was once inaccessible to women. As an artist living and educated in the West, Essaydi explores her past and family with this highly personal work. Meanwhile, her images reflect the complex female identities found in Morocco and other Muslim societies—and give women the opportunity to engage in the emerging culture of Islamic feminism.