The Quaker City, Or, The Monks of Monk Hall

A Romance of Philadelphia Life, Mystery, and Crime

Author: George Lippard

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9780870239717

Category: Fiction

Page: 582

View: 9682

America's best-selling novel in its time, The Quaker City, published in 1845, is a sensational exposé of social corruption, personal debauchery, and the sexual exploitation of women in antebellum Philadelphia. This new edition, with an introduction by David S. Reynolds, brings back into print this important work by George Lippard (1822-1854), a journalist, freethinker, and labor and social reformer.

Die Erfindung der Flügel

Roman

Author: Sue Monk Kidd

Publisher: btb Verlag

ISBN: 364115149X

Category: Fiction

Page: 496

View: 3110

Zwei Frauen, die die Welt verändern Die elfjährige Sarah, wohlbehütete Tochter reicher Gutsbesitzer, erhält in Charleston ein ungewöhnliches Geburtstagsgeschenk – die zehnjährige Hetty »Handful«, die ihr als Dienstmädchen zur Seite stehen soll. Dass Sarah dem schwarzen Mädchen allerdings das Lesen beibringt, hatten ihre Eltern nicht erwartet. Und dass sowohl Sarah als auch Hetty sich befreien wollen aus den Zwängen ihrer Zeit, natürlich auch nicht. Doch Sarah ahnt: Auf sie wartet eine besondere Aufgabe im Leben. Obwohl sie eine Frau ist. Handful ihrerseits sehnt sich nach einem Stück Freiheit. Denn sie weiß aus den märchenhaften Geschichten ihrer Mutter: Einst haben alle Menschen Flügel gehabt ...

The Killers

A Narrative of Real Life in Philadelphia

Author: George Lippard

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780812223743

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 256

View: 2495

The Killers is a tale of gang violence, revenge, kidnapping, racial and ethnic conflict, international intrigue, and working-class triumph. Based on the real-life events of a Philadelphia race riot, this long-out-of-print sensational novella showcases the political and literary interests of its author, bestselling novelist George Lippard.

Sie schufen Amerika

die Gründergeneration von John Adams bis George Washington

Author: Joseph J. Ellis

Publisher: C.H.Beck

ISBN: 9783406528293

Category:

Page: 372

View: 7788


A Greene Country Towne

Philadelphia’s Ecology in the Cultural Imagination

Author: Alan C. Braddock,Laura Turner Igoe

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 0271078928

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 8023

An unconventional history of Philadelphia that operates at the threshold of cultural and environmental studies, A Greene Country Towne expands the meaning of community beyond people to encompass nonhuman beings, things, and forces. By examining a diverse range of cultural acts and material objects created in Philadelphia—from Native American artifacts, early stoves, and literary works to public parks, photographs, and paintings—through the lens of new materialism, the essays in A Greene Country Towne ask us to consider an urban environmental history in which humans are not the only protagonists. This collection reimagines the city as a system of constantly evolving constituents and agencies that have interacted over time, a system powerfully captured by Philadelphia artists, writers, architects, and planners since the seventeenth century. In addition to the editors, contributors to this volume are Maria Farland, Nate Gabriel, Andrea L. M. Hansen, Scott Hicks, Michael Dean Mackintosh, Amy E. Menzer, Stephen Nepa, John Ott, Sue Ann Prince, and Mary I. Unger.

The Cambridge Companion to the Literature of the American Renaissance

Author: Christopher N. Phillips

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108372813

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 2026

The American Renaissance has been a foundational concept in American literary history for nearly a century. The phrase connotes a period, as well as an event, an iconic turning point in the growth of a national literature and a canon of texts that would shape American fiction, poetry, and oratory for generations. F. O. Matthiessen coined the term in 1941 to describe the years 1850–1855, which saw the publications of major writings by Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman. This Companion takes up the concept of the American Renaissance and explores its origins, meaning, and longevity. Essays by distinguished scholars move chronologically from the formative reading of American Renaissance authors to the careers of major figures ignored by Matthiessen, including Stowe, Douglass, Harper, and Longfellow. The volume uses the best of current literary studies, from digital humanities to psychoanalytic theory, to illuminate an era that reaches far beyond the Civil War and continues to shape our understanding of American literature.

Truth's Ragged Edge

The Rise of the American Novel

Author: Philip F. Gura

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1429951346

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 6452

From the acclaimed cultural historian Philip F. Gura comes Truth's Ragged Edge, a comprehensive and original history of the American novel's first century. Grounded in Gura's extensive consideration of the diverse range of important early novels, not just those that remain widely read today, this book recovers many long-neglected but influential writers—such as the escaped slave Harriet Jacobs, the free black Philadelphian Frank J. Webb, and the irrepressible John Neal—to paint a complete and authoritative portrait of the era. Gura also gives us the key to understanding what sets the early novel apart, arguing that it is distinguished by its roots in "the fundamental religiosity of American life." Our nation's pioneering novelists, it turns out, wrote less in the service of art than of morality. This history begins with a series of firsts: the very first American novel, William Hill Brown's The Power of Sympathy, published in 1789; the first bestsellers, Susanna Rowson's Charlotte Temple and Hannah Webster Foster's The Coquette, novels that were, like Brown's, cautionary tales of seduction and betrayal; and the first native genre, religious tracts, which were parables intended to instruct the Christian reader. Gura shows that the novel did not leave behind its proselytizing purpose, even as it evolved. We see Catharine Maria Sedgwick in the 1820s conceiving of A New-England Tale as a critique of Puritanism's harsh strictures, as well as novelists pushing secular causes: George Lippard's The Quaker City, from 1844, was a dark warning about growing social inequality. In the next decade certain writers—Hawthorne and Melville most famously—began to depict interiority and doubt, and in doing so nurtured a broader cultural shift, from social concern to individualism, from faith in a distant god to faith in the self. Rich in subplots and detail, Gura's narrative includes enlightening discussions of the technologies that modernized publishing and allowed for the printing of novels on a mass scale, and of the lively cultural journals and literary salons of early nineteenth-century New York and Boston. A book for the reader of history no less than the reader of fiction, Truth's Ragged Edge—the title drawn from a phrase in Melville, about the ambiguity of truth—is an indispensable guide to the fascinating, unexpected origins of the American novel.

Writers of the American Renaissance

An A-to-Z Guide

Author: Denise D. Knight

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313321405

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 458

View: 8508

A-Z entries detail the lives, works, and critical reception of more than 70 American writers of the 19th century.

The Gun and the Pen

Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and the Fiction of Mobilization

Author: Keith Gandal

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199313989

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 3314

Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and William Faulkner stand as the American voice of the Great War. But was it warfare that drove them to write? Not according to Keith Gandal, who argues that the authors' famous postwar novels were motivated not by their experiences of the horrors of war but rather by their failure to have those experiences. These 'quintessential' male American novelists of the 1920s were all, for different reasons, deemed unsuitable as candidates for full military service or command. As a result, Gandal contends, they felt themselves emasculated--not, as the usual story goes, due to their encounters with trench warfare, but because they got nowhere near the real action. Bringing to light previously unexamined Army records, including new information about the intelligence tests, The Gun and the Pen demonstrates that the authors' frustrated military ambitions took place in the forgotten context of the unprecedented U.S. mobilization for the Great War, a radical effort to transform the Army into a meritocratic institution, indifferent to ethnic and class difference (though not to racial difference). For these Lost Generation writers, the humiliating failure vis-?-vis the Army meant an embarrassment before women and an inability to compete successfully in a rising social order, against a new set of people. The Gun and the Pen restores these seminal novels to their proper historical context and offers a major revision of our understanding of America's postwar literature.

Encyclopedia of Gothic Literature

Author: Mary Ellen Snodgrass

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 1438109113

Category: Gothic revival (Literature)

Page: 497

View: 452

Presents an alphabetical reference guide detailing the lives and works of authors associated with Gothic literature.

New Essays on Poe's Major Tales

Author: Kenneth Silverman

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN: 9780521422437

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 134

View: 5773

In his introduction to New Essays on Poe's Major Tales Kenneth Silverman sets forth Poe's theory of the tale, and examines recurrent motifs in his fiction. The essays that follow present a variety of critical approaches and illuminate different facets of Poe's complex imagination, concentrating on such famous tales as The Cask of Amontillado, The Fall of the House of Usher, The Black Cat, and The Murders in the Rue Morgue. In interpreting one or a few of Poe's classic tales, the critics also illuminate such broader issues as his depiction of women, his theory of knowledge, his understanding of perversity, his relation to popular culture, and his preoccupation with death.

Reforming Men and Women

Gender in the Antebellum City

Author: Bruce Dorsey

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801472886

Category: History

Page: 299

View: 8706

Before the Civil War, the public lives of American men and women intersected most frequently in the arena of religious activism. Bruce Dorsey broadens the field of gender studies, incorporating an analysis of masculinity into the history of early American religion and reform. His is a holistic account that reveals the contested meanings of manhood and womanhood among antebellum Americans, both black and white, middle class and working class.Urban poverty, drink, slavery, and Irish Catholic immigration—for each of these social problems that engrossed Northern reformers, Dorsey examines the often competing views held by male and female activists and shows how their perspectives were further complicated by differences in class, race, and generation. His primary focus is Philadelphia, birthplace of nearly every kind of benevolent and reform society and emblematic of changes occurring throughout the North. With an especially rich history of African-American activism, the city is ideal for Dorsey's exploration of race and reform.Combining stories of both ordinary individuals and major reformers with an insightful analysis of contemporary songs, plays, fiction, and polemics, Dorsey exposes the ways race, class, and ethnicity influenced the meanings of manhood and womanhood in nineteenth-century America. By linking his gendered history of religious activism with the transformations characterizing antebellum society, he contributes to a larger quest: to engender all of American history.

Washington and His Generals, "1776"

The Legends of the American Revolution

Author: George Lippard

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 0271045655

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 516

View: 6205

Published posthumously on the occasion of America's centennial celebration, George Lippard's Washington and His Generals, &“1776&” compiles into a single volume his five popular books of Revolutionary-era historical fiction. The first book, &“The Battle-Day of Germantown,&” features Lippard's hometown and George Washington's intricate and ultimately overcomplicated assault on the British during the Philadelphia campaign of the American Revolution.&“The Wissahikon,&” the second book, depicts the defecting of a Tory to the rebel cause after witnessing General William Howe's failed attempt to bribe a pious George Washington following the British capture of Philadelphia. In &“Benedict Arnold,&” the infamous treachery of the treasonous Continental Army general is the subject. With &“The Battle of the Brandywine,&” Lippard recounts the American despair over the September 11, 1777, battle that drove back the Continental forces, leaving the capital in Philadelphia under British occupation. The collection ends with the fifth book, &“The Fourth of July, 1776,&” his imagined version of the day that inspired most of Lippard's patriotic writing. It includes the often quoted &"Speech of the Unknown&" given by an anonymous revolutionary, which in the book provided the final impetus for the delegates to sign the Declaration of Independence.

Das Haus der vergessenen Bücher

Author: Christopher Morley

Publisher: Hoffmann und Campe

ISBN: 3455170102

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 9364

New York, 1919. Roger Mifflin hat seine größte Leidenschaft, das Lesen, zum Beruf gemacht. In seinem Antiquariat in Brooklyn findet man ihn dort, wo der Tabakrauch am dichtesten ist. Unterstützt wird er von seiner ebenso patenten wie resoluten Ehefrau und seinem Hund Bock - Bock wie Boccaccio. Bücher sind Mifflins Leben. Von Werbemaßnahmen für sein Geschäft will er allerdings nichts wissen, und so lässt er den jungen Aubrey Gilbert, angestellt bei der Grey Matter Agency, ziemlich abblitzen, als der ihm seine Dienste anbietet. Dennoch freunden sich die beiden an, und bald kommt Gilbert täglich ins Geschäft. Was auch an Mifflins neuer Hilfskraft liegen mag - der schönen Titania Chapman, deren Leben in Gefahr zu sein scheint. Und das gilt nicht nur für ihr Leben ...

Transatlantic Sensations

Author: Kristin N Huston,Professor Jennifer Phegley,Professor John Cyril Barton

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409479323

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 302

View: 4999

Bringing together sensation writing and transatlantic studies, this collection makes a convincing case for the symbiotic relationship between literary works on both sides of the Atlantic. Transatlantic Sensations begins with the 'prehistories' of the genre, looking at the dialogue and debate generated by the publication of sentimental and gothic fiction by William Godwin, Susanna Rowson, and Charles Brockden Brown.Thus establishing a context for the treatment of works by Louisa May Alcott, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Dion Boucicault, Wilkie Collins, Charles Dickens, George Lippard, Charles Reade, Harriet Beecher Stowe and George Thompson, the volumetakes up a wide range of sensational topics including sexuality, slavery, criminal punishment, literary piracy, mesmerism, and the metaphors of foreign literary invasion and diseased reading. Concluding essays offer a reassessment of the realist and domestic fiction of George Eliot, Charlotte Yonge, and Thomas Hardy in the context of transatlantic sensationalism, emphasizing the evolution of the genre throughout the century and mapping a new transatlantic lineage for this immensely popular literary form. The book's final essay examines an international kidnapping case that was a journalistic sensation at the turn of the twentieth century.