The Politics of Maternity Care

Services for Childbearing Women in Twentieth-century Britain

Author: Jo Garcia,Robert Kilpatrick

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: Medical

Page: 346

View: 3726

This concise volume examines the maternity care of British women, in both historical and social contexts. It includes authoritative information on such issues as the mother's control over childbirth, the changing role of the father, the development of midwifery, and the relationship between doctors and midwives.

The Politics of Maternity

Author: Rosemary Mander,Jo Murphy-Lawless

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136737073

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 240

View: 3615

The evidence surrounding the skills and approaches to support good birth has grown exponentially over the last two decades, but so too have the obstacles facing women and midwives who strive to achieve good birth. This new book critically explores the complex issues surrounding contemporary childbirth practices in a climate which is ever more medicalised amidst greater insecurity at broad social and political levels. The authors offer a rigorous, and thought-provoking, analysis of current clinical, managerial and policy-making environments, and how they have prevented sustaining the kind of progress we need. The Politics of Maternity explores the most hopeful developments such as the abundant evidence for one-to-one care for women, and sets these accounts against the background of changes in health service organisation and provision that block these approaches from becoming an everyday occurrence for women giving birth. The book sets out the case for renewed attention to the politics of childbirth and what this politics must entail if we are to give birth back to women. Designed to help professionals cope with the transition from education to the reality of the system within which they learn and practise, this inspiring book will help to assist them to function and care effectively in a changing health care environment.

The Politics of Pregnancy

Adolescent Sexuality and Public Policy

Author: Annette Lawson,Deborah L. Rhode

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300065480

Category: Social Science

Page: 348

View: 7178

Teenage pregnancy is widely viewed as a significant social problem. This book argues that much of the problem stems from inaccurate perceptions of what the problem is. The problem, according to the text, is not teenagers who want sex too soon but a society that offers too little, too late.

The Politics of Pregnancy

Policy Dilemmas in the Maternal-Fetal Relationship

Author: Janna C Merrick

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317952790

Category: Law

Page: 262

View: 4737

Here is a comprehensive overview and analysis of issues concerning the maternal-fetal relationship, from abortion to surrogate motherhood. Unlike many books which cover reproductive issues in general, this book focuses in-depth on one aspect of reproduction--the maternal-fetal relationship--to give readers a detailed study of the many issues involved. The Politics of Pregnancy discusses public policy dimensions of this relationship and posits new, critical political dilemmas. Many chapters in this unique book also provide significant clinical information as well as conceptual analysis. The Politics of Pregnancy offers great diversity in terms of the disciplinary backgrounds of the authors and their ideological perspectives. Authors come from many fields, including sociology, political science, pediatrics, ethics, and psychiatry, and provide diverse, sometimes opposing, analytical positions. Some of the topics they debate include: maternal substance use during pregnancy prenatal technology pregnancy and workplace hazards court-ordered obstetrical intervention fetal experimentation Readers interested in public and health care policy, nursing, feminism, pediatrics, or ethics, will find The Politics of Pregnancy to be a stimulating and thought-provoking book. This volume also makes an excellent discussion tool for graduate courses in these areas.

The Politics of Motherhood

British Writing and Culture, 1680-1760

Author: Toni Bowers

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521551748

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 262

View: 1841

Through detailed examination of a wide variety of novels, plays, sermons, songs, popular engravings, portraiture, and propaganda from the period, Toni Bowers examines the eighteenth-century social and cultural struggle to develop new ideals for virtuous motherhood. She shows how popular representations of mothers codified and enforced a private and domestic model of maternal excellence, and argues that contemporary Western culture is still limited by its commitment to the contradictory maternal ideals established in early-eighteenth-century discourse.

Race, Maternity, and the Politics of Birth Control in South Africa, 1910-39

Author: S. Klausen

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230511252

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 5301

Using original primary sources, this book uncovers and analyzes for the first time the politics of fertility and the battle over birth control in South Africa from 1910 (the year the country was formed) to 1945. It examines the nature and achievements of the South African birth-control movement in pre-apartheid South Africa, including the establishment of voluntary birth-control organizations in urban centres, the national birth-control coalition, and the clinic practices of the country's first birth-control clinics. The book spotlights important actors such as the birth controllers themselves, the women of all 'races' who utilized the clinics' services and the Department of Public Health, placing these within an international as well as national context.

The Politics of Parental Leave Policies

Children, Parenting, Gender and the Labour Market

Author: Sheila B. Kamerman,Peter Moss

Publisher: Policy Press

ISBN: 1847429033

Category: Medical

Page: 296

View: 7186

The politics of parental leave policies addresses how and why, and by whom, particular policies are created and subsequently developed in particular countries. It examines the factors that bring about variations in leave policy, covering fifteen countries in Europe and beyond, and the European Union.

Material Discourses of Health and Illness

Author: Lucy Yardley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134773811

Category: Psychology

Page: 256

View: 1064

Material Discourses of Health and Illness applies discursive approaches to the field of health psychology, in stark contrast to the bio-medical model of health and illness. The discursive approach uses the person's experience and feelings as the central focus of interest, whereas the more traditional models regarded these as coincidental and relatively unimportant. The book provides an accessible and compelling introduction to social constructionist and discursive approaches to those with limited previous knowledge of socio-linguistic theory and research. It provides practical examples of how these approaches can be applied to the field of health psychology with a collection of sophisticated discursive analyses which demonstrate the distinctive contribution that can be made by psychologists to a field that has been largely dominated by sociologists and anthropologists.

The Wages of Sickness

The Politics of Health Insurance in Progressive America

Author: Beatrix Hoffman

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807860727

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 280

View: 3740

The Clinton administration's failed health care reform was not the first attempt to establish government-sponsored medical coverage in the United States. From 1915 to 1920, Progressive reformers led a spirited but ultimately unsuccessful crusade for compulsory health insurance in New York State. Beatrix Hoffman argues that this first health insurance campaign was a crucial moment in the creation of the American welfare state and health care system. Its defeat, she says, gave rise to an uneven and inegalitarian system of medical coverage and helped shape the limits of American social policy for the rest of the century. Hoffman examines each of the major combatants in the battle over compulsory health insurance. While physicians, employers, the insurance industry, and conservative politicians forged a uniquely powerful coalition in opposition to health insurance proposals, she shows, reformers' potential allies within women's organizations and the labor movement were bitterly divided. Against the backdrop of World War I and the Red Scare, opponents of reform denounced government-sponsored health insurance as "un-American" and, in the process, helped fashion a political culture that resists proposals for universal health care and a comprehensive welfare state even today.

Maternal Transition

A North-South Politics of Pregnancy and Childbirth

Author: Candace Johnson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317704592

Category: Political Science

Page: 230

View: 6385

What are the political dimensions that are revealed in women’s preferences for health care during pregnancy and childbirth? The answers to this question vary from one community to the next, and often from woman to the next, although the trends in the Global North and South are strikingly different. Employing three conceptual frames; medicalization, the public-private distinction, and intersectionality, Candace Johnson examines these differences through the narratives of women in Canada, the United States, Cuba, and Honduras. In Canada and the United States, women from privileged and marginalized social groups demonstrate the differences across the North-South divide, and women in Cuba and Honduras speak to the realities of severely constrained decision-making in developing countries. Each case study includes narratives drawn from in-depth interviews with women who were pregnant or who had recently had children. Johnson argues that women’s expressed preferences in different contexts reveal important details about the inequality that they experience in that context, in addition to as various elements of identity. Both inequality and identity are affected by the ways in which women experience the division between public and private lives – the life of the community and the life of the home and family – as well as the consequences of intersectionality – the combinations of various sources of disadvantage and women’s reactions to these, either in the form of resistance or compliance. The rigorous and highly original cross cultural and comparative research on health, gender, poverty and social context makes Maternal Transition an excellent contribution to global maternal health policy debates.

Born at Home: The Biological, Cultural and Political Dimensions of Maternity Care in the United States

Author: Melissa Cheyney

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 0495793663

Category: Social Science

Page: 160

View: 1255

This is a book about women who choose to give birth at home against the wishes and indeed the interests of established medicine. It focuses on conditions in the US. It places the issue within the context of the continuing health care crisis in this country and poses surprisingly traditional alternatives to the mechanized and impersonal care delivery that accompanies that crisis and indeed arises from it. BORN AT HOME is brief and inexpensive indeed free when bundled- and designed to be used in an introductory Anthropology class with a core textbook or in an upper division course alongside additional readings. It offers an intimate look at an emerging movement that runs counter to established medical practice and yet poses a viable alternative to that practice. The writing is direct and personal and filed with numerous individual accounts. It is designed to inspire discussion indeed to provoke controversy and yet set on sound scholarly principles. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Amid Social Contradictions

Towards a History of Social Work in Europe

Author: Gisela Hauss

Publisher: Barbara Budrich

ISBN: 3866491506

Category: Social Science

Page: 263

View: 2925

How does social work keep its balance between the requirements of its clients and its role as an agency of state and society? In historical analyses from various countries, international experts show how social work has succeeded in keeping conflicting demands at bay. Their contributions look at historical situations in Finland, Germany, Hungary, the Netherlands, Poland, the Republic of Ireland, Russia, the former Soviet Union, Switzerland, and the former Yugoslavia.òTable of contents include: Youth Care in Austria: The Politics of Child Removal * Professional Social Work after the Second World War Finland * Republic of Ireland * Hungarian Settlements * City Welfare and Eugenics: Case Studies from Switzerland * Care and Control in Soviet Social Policy in 1917-1930s * Helping the Mother to be "Soviet" * The Tradition of Social Work in Poland in the First Half of the 20th Century * Towards the History of Social Work Training in Germany * The Development of Professional Social Work in Switzerland * Professionalization of Social Work in Yugoslavia * A Communist World Organization in the Force Field between Governmental Oppression and Social Work for Political Prisoners * Power in Social Work in Socialism * Local Charity and Social Work in the Netherlands.

Inventing Maternity

Politics, Science, and Literature, 1650-1865

Author: Susan C. Greenfield,Carol Barash

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813158982

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 256

View: 7063

Not until the eighteenth century was the image of the tender, full-time mother invented. This image retains its power today. Inventing Maternity demonstrates that, despite its association with an increasingly standardized set of values, motherhood remained contested terrain. Drawing on feminist, cultural, and postcolonial theory, Inventing Maternity surveys a wide range of sources--medical texts, political tracts, religious doctrine, poems, novels, slave narratives, conduct books, and cookbooks. The first half of the volume, covering the mid-seventeenth to the late eighteenth centuries, considers central debates about fetal development, pregnancy, breastfeeding, and childbearing. The second half, covering the late eighteenth to the mid-nineteenth centuries, charts a historical shift to the regulation of reproduction as maternity is increasingly associated with infanticide, population control, poverty, and colonial, national, and racial instability. In her introduction, Greenfield provides a historical overview of early modern interpretations of maternity. She concludes with a consideration of their impact on current debates about reproductive rights and technologies, child custody, and the cycles of poverty.

Mothering Daughters

Novels and the Politics of Family Romance, Frances Burney to Jane Austen

Author: Susan C. Greenfield

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 0814338283

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 232

View: 3697

The rise of the novel and of the ideal nuclear family was no mere coincidence, argues Susan C. Greenfield in this fascinating look at the construction of modern maternity.

The Rise and Fall of National Women's Hospital

A History

Author: Linda Bryder

Publisher: Auckland University Press

ISBN: 1775587231

Category: Medical

Page: 336

View: 2900

Natural childbirth and rooming-in; artificial insemination and in vitro fertilisation; sterilisation and abortion: women's health and reproduction went through a revolution in the twentieth century as scientific advances confronted ethical and political dilemmas. In New Zealand, the major site for this revolution was National Women's Hospital. Established in Auckland in 1946, with a purpose-built building that opened in 1964, National Women's was the home of medical breakthroughs by Sir William (Bill) Liley and Sir Graham (Mont) Liggins; of the Lawson quintuplets and the 'glamorous gynaecologists'; and of scandals surrounding the so-called 'unfortunate experiment' and the neonatal chest physiotherapy inquiry. In this major history, Linda Bryder traces the evolution of National Women's in order to tell a wider story of reproductive health. She uses the varying perspectives of doctors, nurses, midwives, consumer groups and patients to show how together their dialogue shaped the nature of motherhood and women's health in twentieth-century New Zealand.

Performing Maternity in Early Modern England

Author: Kathryn M. Moncrief,Kathryn Read McPherson

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9780754661177

Category: History

Page: 247

View: 1312

The essays in Performing Maternity in Early Modern England explore maternity's textual and cultural representation, performative aspects and practical consequences from 1540-1690. They emphasize that the embodied, repeated and public nature of maternity defines it as inherently performative and ultimately central to the production of gender identity in the period.

Son Preference

Sex Selection, Gender and Culture in South Asia

Author: Navtej K. Purewal

Publisher: Berg

ISBN: 1847887538

Category: Social Science

Page: 160

View: 9132

The preference for male children transcends many societies and cultures, making it an issue of local and global dimensions. While son preference is not a new phenomenon and has existed historically in many parts of Asia, its contemporary expressions illustrate the gendered outcomes of social power relations as they interact and intersect with culture, economy and technologies. Son Preference brings together key debates on the subject of son preference by assessing existing work in the field and providing new insights through primary research. The book covers a broad range of social science discussions and draws upon textual and ethnographic material from India. Son Preference will be useful to students, scholars, activists and anyone interested in the issues surrounding gender inequity, sex selection and skewed sex ratios.

The Politics of Motherhood

Author: Jadwiga Pieper Mooney

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre

ISBN: 0822973618

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 2964

With the 2006 election of Michelle Bachelet as the first female president and women claiming fifty percent of her cabinet seats, the political influence of Chilean women has taken a major step forward. Despite a seemingly liberal political climate, Chile has a murky history on women's rights, and progress has been slow, tenuous, and in many cases, non-existent. Chronicling an era of unprecedented modernization and political transformation, Jadwiga E. Pieper Mooney examines the negotiations over women's rights and the politics of gender in Chile throughout the twentieth century. Centering her study on motherhood, Pieper Mooney explores dramatic changes in health policy, population paradigms, and understandings of human rights, and reveals that motherhood is hardly a private matter defined only by individual women or couples. Instead, it is intimately tied to public policies and political competitions on nation-state and international levels. The increased legitimacy of women's demands for rights, both locally and globally, has led to some improvements in gender equity. Yet feminists in contemporary Chile continue to face strong opposition from neoconservatism in the Catholic Church and a mixture of public apathy and legal wrangling over reproductive rights and health.

The Women's Joint Congressional Committee and the Politics of Maternalism, 1920-30

Author: Jan Wilson

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252092910

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 9269

The rise and fall of a feminist reform powerhouse This is the first comprehensive history of the Women's Joint Congressional Committee (WJCC), a large umbrella organization founded by former suffrage leaders in 1920 in order to coordinate organized women's reform. Encompassing nearly every major national women's organization of its time, the WJCC evolved into a powerful lobbying force for the legislative agendas of twelve million women, and was recognized by critics and supporters alike as "the most powerful lobby in Washington." Through a close examination of the WJCC's most consequential and contentious campaigns, Jan Doolittle Wilson demonstrates organized women's strategies and initial success in generating congressional and grassroots support for their far-reaching, progressive reforms. By using the WJCC as a lens through which to analyze women's political culture during the 1920s, the book also sheds new light on the initially successful ways women lobbied for social legislation, the inherent limitations of that process for pursuing class-based reforms, and the enormous difficulties faced by women trying to expand public responsibility for social welfare in the years following the Nineteenth Amendment's passage. A volume in the series Women in American History, edited by Anne Firor Scott, Susan Armitage, Susan K. Cahn, and Deborah Gray White