The Oxford Handbook of the Reception History of the Bible

Author: Michael Lieb,Emma Mason,Jonathan Roberts

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 019164918X

Category: Religion

Page: 742

View: 2556

In recent decades, reception history has become an increasingly important and controversial topic of discussion in biblical studies. Rather than attempting to recover the original meaning of biblical texts, reception history focuses on exploring the history of interpretation. In doing so it locates the dominant historical-critical scholarly paradigm within the history of interpretation, rather than over and above it. At the same time, the breadth of material and hermeneutical issues that reception history engages with questions any narrow understanding of the history of the Bible and its effects on faith communities. The challenge that reception history faces is to explore tradition without either reducing its meaning to what faith communities think is important, or merely offering anthologies of interesting historical interpretations. This major new handbook addresses these matters by presenting reception history as an enterprise (not a method) that questions and understands tradition afresh. The Oxford Handbook of the Reception History of the Bible consciously allows for the interplay of the traditional and the new through a two-part structure. Part I comprises a set of essays surveying the outline, form, and content of twelve key biblical books that have been influential in the history of interpretation. Part II offers a series of in-depth case studies of the interpretation of particular key biblical passages or books with due regard for the specificity of their social, cultural or aesthetic context. These case studies span two millennia of interpretation by readers with widely differing perspectives. Some are at the level of a group response (from Gnostic readings of Genesis, to Post-Holocaust Jewish interpretations of Job); others examine individual approaches to texts (such as Augustine and Pelagius on Romans, or Gandhi on the Sermon on the Mount). Several chapters examine historical moments, such as the 1860 debate over Genesis and evolution, while others look to wider themes such as non-violence or millenarianism. Further chapters study in detail the works of popular figures who have used the Bible to provide inspiration for their creativity, from Dante and Handel, to Bob Dylan and Dan Brown.

The Oxford Illustrated History of the Holy Land

Author: Robert G. Hoyland,H. G. M. Williamson

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 019872439X

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 8432

The Oxford Illustrated History of the Holy Land covers the 3,000 years which saw the rise of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam - and relates the familiar stories of the sacred texts with the fruits of modern scholarship. Beginning with the origins of the people who became the Israel of theBible, it follows the course of the ensuing millennia down to the time when the Ottoman Empire succumbed to British and French rule at the end of the First World War.Parts of the story, especially as known from the Bible, will be widely familiar. Less familiar are the ways in which modern research, both from archaeology and from other ancient sources, sometimes modify this story historically. Better understanding, however, enables us to appreciate crucialchapters in the story of the Holy Land, such as how and why Judaism developed in the way that it did from the earlier sovereign states of Israel and Judah and the historical circumstances in which Christianity emerged from its Jewish cradle. Later parts of the story are vital not only for the history of Islam and its relationships with the two older religions, but also for the development of pilgrimage and religious tourism, as well as the notions of sacred space and of holy books with which we are still familiar today. From the time ofNapoleon on, European powers came increasingly to develop both cultural and political interest in the region, culminating in the British and French conquests which carved out the modern states of the Middle East. Sensitive to the concerns of those for whom the sacred books of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are of paramount religious authority, the authors all try sympathetically to show how historical information from other sources, as well as scholarly study of the texts themselves, enriches ourunderstanding of the history of the region and its prominent position in the world's cultural and intellectual history.

The Oxford Handbook of Early Christian Studies

Author: Susan Ashbrook Harvey,David G. Hunter

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199271566

Category: Philosophy

Page: 1020

View: 4502

The Oxford Handbook of Early Christian Studies responds to and celebrates the explosion of research in this inter-disciplinary field over recent decades. It is thematically arranged to encompass history, literature, thought, practices, and material culture. Whilst the burgeoning of scholarly work has made it impossible for any one scholar to maintain expertise in every aspect of the discipline, this handbook seeks to aid both the new researcher in the field andthe scholar entering an unfamiliar sub-specialty. Each chapter orients readers to the current 'state of the question' in a given area, reflecting on key research issues to date, highlighting primarysources and giving suggestions as to the likely direction of future work. The Handbook takes the period 100 to 600 CE as a chronological span and examines the vast geographical area impacted by the early church, in Western and Eastern late antiquity.

Prophecy and the Prophets of the Old Testament

Author: John F. A. Sawyer

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 163

View: 9015

Taking a refreshingly original approach to a familiar topic, this authoritative study examines the Biblical prophets and Jewish and Christian interpretations of prophecy. Beginning with a broad discussion of the phenomena of prophecy and the prophetic literature, Sawyer explores the work of Old Testament prophets, ranging from Moses to Huldah and Daniel to Malachi. In marked contrast to other studies, he pays particular attention to legends about the prophets, both canonical and apocryphal, many of which have been considerably more influential in the history of Western civilization than the prophets' original words. He concludes with a chapter on Jewish, Christian and Muslim interpretation and the matter of the fulfillment of prophecy.

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible

Author: Michael D. Coogan

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195377370

Category: Bibles

Page: 1056

View: 6473

The two-volume Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible is a scholarly reference work with articles on each of the canonical books of the Bible, major apocryphal books of the New and Old Testaments, important non-canonical texts, and thematic essays on topics such as canonicity, textual criticism, and translation. The first in a series of in-depth biblical reference works, Books of the Bible will be available on DRS and in Oxford Biblical Studies Online.

The Oxford History of Christian Worship

Author: Geoffrey Wainwright

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195138864

Category: Religion

Page: 916

View: 887

A comprehensive history of the origins and development of Christian worship, from ancient times to the present day, provides a defintive study of the evolution of Christian liturgy, theology, church history, artistic influence, and social and cultural contexts, covering such topics as Russian Orthodoxy, Women in Worship, Liturgical Music, and the Apostolic Tradition.

The Oxford Companion to the Bible

Author: Bruce M. Metzger,Michael David Coogan

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199743919

Category: Religion

Page: 932

View: 8298

The Bible has had an immeasurable influence on Western culture, touching on virtually every aspect of our lives. It is one of the great wellsprings of Western religious, ethical, and philosophical traditions. It has been an endless source of inspiration to artists, from classic works such as Michaelangelo's Last Judgment, Handel's Messiah, or Milton's Paradise Lost, to modern works such as Thomas Mann's Joseph and His Brothers or Martin Scorsese's controversial Last Temptation of Christ. For countless generations, it has been a comfort in suffering, a place to reflect on the mysteries of birth, death, and immortality. Its stories and characters are an integral part of the repertoire of every educated adult, forming an enduring bond that spans thousands of years and embraces a vast community of believers and nonbelievers. The Oxford Companion to the Bible provides an authoritative one-volume reference to the people, places, events, books, institutions, religious belief, and secular influence of the Bible. Written by more than 250 scholars from some 20 nations and embracing a wide variety of perspectives, the Companion offers over seven hundred entries, ranging from brief identifications--who is Dives? where is Pisgah?--to extensive interpretive essays on topics such as the influence of the Bible on music or law. Ranging far beyond the scope of a traditional Bible dictionary, the Companion features, in addition to its many informative, factual entries, an abundance of interpretive essays. Here are extended entries on religious concepts from immortality, sin, and grace, to baptism, ethics, and the Holy Spirit. The contributors also explore biblical views of modern issues such as homosexuality, marriage, and anti-Semitism, and the impact of the Bible on the secular world (including a four-part article on the Bible's influence on literature). Of course, the Companion can also serve as a handy reference, the first place to turn to find factual information on the Bible. Readers will find fascinating, informative articles on all the books of the Bible--including the Apocrypha and many other ancient texts, such as the Dead Sea Scrolls, Pseudepigrapha, and the Mishrah. Virtually every figure who walked across the biblical stage is identified here, ranging from Rebekah, Rachel, and Mary, to Joseph, Barabbas, and Jesus. The Companion also offers entries that shed light on daily life in ancient Israel and the earliest Christian communities, with fascinating articles on feasts and festivals, clothing, medicine, units of time, houses, and furniture. Finally, there are twenty-eight pages of full-color maps, providing an accurate, detailed portrait of the biblical world. A vast compendium of information related to scriptures, here is an ideal complement to the Bible, an essential volume for every home and library, the first place to turn for information on the central book of Western culture.

Scribal Culture and the Making of the Hebrew Bible

Author: Karel Van der Toorn

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674032543

Category: Religion

Page: 401

View: 3915

The scribes of ancient Israel are indeed the main figures behind the Hebrew Bible, and this book tells their story for the first time. Drawing comparisons with the scribal practices of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, van der Toorn details the methods, assumptions, and material means that gave rise to biblical texts. Traditionally seen as the copycats of antiquity, the scribes emerge here as the literate elite who held the key to the production and the transmission of texts.

The Oxford Companion to Christian Thought

Author: Adrian Hastings,Alistair Mason,Hugh Pyper

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198600240

Category: Religion

Page: 777

View: 666

Entries explore the history of Christian thought from Catholic, Prostestant, and Orthodox perspectives, and discuss regional and national traditions, various denominations, theological topics, symbolism, and controversial issues.

How the Bible Came to Be

Author: John Barton

Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press

ISBN: 1611642434

Category: Religion

Page: 100

View: 3638

In a clear and concise way, John Barton describes the development of the Bible. He explains how the Bible came to be written and collected into the authoritative Scriptures of the Christian Church. Barton untangles the web of history and lets the reader appreciate the journey from spoken word to written word.

Ancient Israel

From Abraham to the Roman Destruction of the Temple

Author: Hershel Shanks

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781935335412

Category: Jews

Page: 411

View: 7825


The Oxford Bible Commentary

Author: John Muddiman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199277184

Category: Religion

Page: 1386

View: 5404

CD-ROM contains: Introductions and verse-by-verse commentaries to Genesis and Mark's Gospel -- Logos Library System.

Memories of Ancient Israel

An Introduction to Biblical History - Ancient and Modern

Author: Philip R. Davies

Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press

ISBN: 0664232884

Category: Religion

Page: 182

View: 2268

Recent years have seen an explosion of writing on the history of Israel, prompted largely by definitive archaeological surveys and attempts to write a genuine archaeological history of ancient Israel and Judah. This text is an incisive critique of and alternative proposal to these approaches to biblical history.

The Cambridge Companion to the Bible

Author: Howard Clark Kee,Eric M. Meyers,John Rogerson,Amy-Jill Levine,Anthony J. Saldarini

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521869973

Category: Religion

Page: 734

View: 6095

The Cambridge Companion to the Bible, Second Edition focuses on the ever-changing social and cultural contexts in which the biblical authors and their original readers lived. The authors of the first edition were chosen for their internationally recognized expertise in their respective fields: the history and literature of Israel; postbiblical Judaism; biblical archaeology; and the origins and early literature of Christianity. In this second edition, all of their chapters have been updated and thoroughly revised, with a view towards better investigating the social histories embedded in the biblical texts and incorporating the most recent archaeological discoveries from the Ancient Near East and Hellenistic worlds.

The King and the Land

A Geography of Royal Power in the Biblical World

Author: Stephen C. Russell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199361886

Category: Bible

Page: 280

View: 814

In The King and the Land, Stephen C. Russell offers a history of space and power in the biblical world by demonstrating how the monarchies in ancient Israel and Judah asserted their power over strategically important spaces such as privately-held lands, religious buildings,collectively-governed towns, and urban water systems. Case studies in the book treat Solomon's use of foreign architecture (1 Kings 5-8), David's dedication of land to Yahweh (2 Samuel 24), Jehu's decommissioning of Baal's temple (2 Kings 10), Absalom's navigation of the collective politics ofLevantine towns (2 Samuel 15), and Hezekiah's reshaping of the tunnels that supplied Jerusalem with water (2 Kings 20; 2 Chronicles 32). Steeped in archaeological and textual evidence, this book contextualizes Israelite and Judahite royal and tribal politics within broader patterns of ancient Near Eastern spatial power. By providing a historical investigation into the nature of power and physical space in the Iron Age Levant, thisbook also offers fresh literary readings of the biblical texts that anchor its theses.

Covenant

The History of a Biblical Idea

Author: Delbert R. Hillers

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801810114

Category: History

Page: 194

View: 3449

The familiar idea of a covenant between God and His people is central to much of the literature of the Old Testament. Through analyses of the style, content, and language of biblical and extra-biblical documents, Dr. Hillers renders the complex idea of covenant comprehensible to the layman as he provides insights into such ideas as the love of God and the knowledge of God--both of which are intimately connected with Israel's concept of covenant. (Biblical Studies)

The Oxford Handbook of Biblical Narrative

Author: Danna Nolan Fewell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199967725

Category: Religion

Page: 644

View: 3090

Comprised of contributions from scholars across the globe, The Oxford Handbook to Biblical Narrative is a state-of-the-art anthology, offering critical treatments of both the Bible's narratives and topics related to the Bible's narrative constructions. The Handbook covers the Bible's narrative literature, from Genesis to Revelation, providing concise overviews of literary-critical scholarship as well as innovative readings of individual narratives informed by a variety of methodological approaches and theoretical frameworks. The volume as a whole combines literary sensitivities with the traditional historical and sociological questions of biblical criticism and puts biblical studies into intentional conversation with other disciplines in the humanities. It reframes biblical literature in a way that highlights its aesthetic characteristics, its ethical and religious appeal, its organic qualities as communal literature, its witness to various forms of social and political negotiation, and its uncanny power to affect readers and hearers across disparate time-frames and global communities.