The Oxford History of Christian Worship

Author: Geoffrey Wainwright

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195138864

Category: Religion

Page: 916

View: 6340

A comprehensive history of the origins and development of Christian worship, from ancient times to the present day, provides a defintive study of the evolution of Christian liturgy, theology, church history, artistic influence, and social and cultural contexts, covering such topics as Russian Orthodoxy, Women in Worship, Liturgical Music, and the Apostolic Tradition.

The Oxford History of the Roman World

Author: John Boardman

Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks

ISBN: 9780192802033

Category: History

Page: 518

View: 2456

In less than fifty-three years, Rome subjected most of the known world to its rule. This authoritative and compelling work tells the story of the rise of Rome from its origins as a cluster of villages to the foundation of the Roman Empire by Augustus, to its consolidation in the first two centuries CE. It also discusses aspects of the later Empire and its influence on Western civilization, not least of which was the adoption of Christianity. Packed with fascinating detail and written by acknowledged experts in Roman history, the book expertly interweaves chapters on social and political history, the Emperors, art and architecture, and the works of leading Roman poets, historians, and philosophers. Reinforcing the book's historical framework are maps, diagrams, a useful chronology, and a full bibliography. Taken as a whole, this rich work offers an indispensable resource on the history of one of the world's greatest empires.

The Old Testament: A Very Short Introduction

Author: Michael D. Coogan

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN: 0195305051

Category: Bibles

Page: 140

View: 8105

This Very Short Introduction provides a short, accessible overview for general readers interested in learning more about the Old Testament and its interpretation. Coogan explores the significance of the history and literature of the Old Testament and describes how non-biblical evidence, such as archaeological data and texts, has illuminated the Old Testament in a larger context. Coogan discusses law in the Bible, particularly the Ten Commandments and the biblical understandings of prophecy, myth, exodus, death, and afterlife. Finally, Coogan discusses the enduring significance of the Old Testament.

The Old Testament: A Very Short Introduction

Author: Michael Coogan

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199885443

Category: Religion

Page: 160

View: 4933

Eminent biblical scholar Michael D. Coogan offers here a wide-ranging and stimulating exploration of the Old Testament, illuminating its importance as history, literature, and sacred text. Coogan explains the differences between the Bible of Jewish tradition (the "Hebrew Bible") and the Old Testament of Christianity, and also examines the different contents of the Bibles used by Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox Christians, and Protestants. He looks at the rise of modern biblical scholarship as well as the recovery of ancient Near Eastern literatures and their significance for biblical interpretation. Coogan explores the use of invented dialogue and historical fiction in the Old Testament, the presence of mythic elements in apparently historical accounts, and the relationship of ancient Israelite myths to those of their neighbors. The book considers the Old Testament's idea of divine justice, especially in Ecclesiastes and Job, and looks at notions of the afterlife in the ancient Near East and in ancient Israel. Coogan highlights the significance of the history and literature of the Old Testament and describes how non-biblical evidence, such as archaeological data and texts, has placed the Old Testament in a larger and more illuminating context. The book also discusses law and ritual in the Bible as well as the biblical understandings of prophecy. Here then is a marvelous overview of one of the great pillars of Western religion and culture, a book whose significance has endured for thousands of years and which remains vitally important today for Jews, Christians, and Muslims worldwide. About the Series: Oxford's Very Short Introductions offers concise and original introductions to a wide range of subjects--from Islam to Sociology, Politics to Classics, and Literary Theory to History. Not simply a textbook of definitions, each volume provides trenchant and provocative--yet always balanced and complete--discussions of the central issues in a given topic. Every Very Short Introduction gives a readable evolution of the subject in question, demonstrating how it has developed and influenced society. Whatever the area of study, whatever the topic that fascinates the reader, the series has a handy and affordable guide that will likely prove indispensable.

The Oxford Guide to People & Places of the Bible

Author: Bruce Manning Metzger,Michael David Coogan,Michael D. Coogan

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195176100

Category: Religion

Page: 374

View: 7274

Offering a wealth of reliable information, The Oxford Guide to People & Places of the Bible provides more than 300 articles that cover everyone from Adam and Eve to Jesus Christ and everywhere from the Garden of Eden to Golgotha and Gethsemane. Readers will find fascinating, informative entries on virtually every major figure who walked across the biblical stage. Here are Hebrew Bible figures such as Cain and Abel, Noah and Methuselah, Abraham and Isaac, David and Goliath, Solomon and Sheba, Moses and Aaron, Naomi and Ruth, and Samson and Delilah. The New Testament is likewise well covered, with pieces on Peter and Paul, John the Baptist and Mary Magdalene, the apostles (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John), Pontius Pilate and Judas Iscariot, and of course Jesus, Mary, and Joseph. Articles also define groups of people who figure in the Bible, such as Angels, Archangels, and Demons, the Magi, the Tribes of Israel, and Women. Entries on the significant places of the Bible, both ancient and modern, include kingdoms and countries (Egypt, Assyria, Mesopotamia) and cities (Bethlehem, Jerusalem, Sodom and Gomorrah), as well as geographical features such as the Sea of Galilee and Mount Hebron. The guide includes a detailed index for ease of use, and 14 pages of color maps, providing an accurate, detailed portrait of the biblical world. Here then is the first place to turn to find factual information on the people and places of Holy Scripture. Written by an international team of noted biblical experts, it is an essential addition to any family library as well as a useful, reliable resource for scholars and students.

The Oxford Dictionary of the Jewish Religion

Author: Adele Berlin

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199730040

Category: Reference

Page: 934

View: 2487

Hailed by Library Journal as the "best ready-reference access point to the Jewish religion," and as "essential" by CHOICE in its First Edition, The Oxford Dictionary of the Jewish Religion has been the go-to resource for students, scholars, and researchers in Judaic Studies since its 1997 publication. Now, The Oxford Dictionary of the Jewish Religion, Second Edition focuses on recent and changing rituals in the Jewish community that have come to the fore since the 1997 publication of the First Edition, including the growing trend of baby-naming ceremonies and the founding of gay/lesbian synagogues Under the editorship of Adele Berlin, nearly 200 internationally renowned scholars have created a new edition that incorporates updated bibliographies, biographies of 20th-century individuals who have shaped the recent thought and history of Judaism, and an index with alternate spellings of Hebrew terms. Entries from the previous edition have been be revised, new entries commissioned, and cross-references added, all to increase ease of navigation research. The Dictionary covers more than three millennia of Jewish religious thought, custom, law, and practice, from traditional approaches to Reform, Conservative, Reconstructionist, and post-denominational Judaism. Brief definitions and longer essays, all supplemented with bibliographies, enlighten readers about the major figures, folklore, and events in the history of Judaism throughout the world.

The Oxford History of Islam

Author: John L. Esposito

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199880417

Category: Religion

Page: 768

View: 7579

Lavishly illustrated with over 300 pictures, including more than 200 in full color, The Oxford History of Islam offers the most wide-ranging and authoritative account available of the second largest--and fastest growing--religion in the world. John L. Esposito, Editor-in-Chief of the four-volume Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern Islamic World, has gathered together sixteen leading scholars, both Muslim and non-Muslim, to examine the origins and historical development of Islam--its faith, community, institutions, sciences, and arts. Beginning in the pre-Islamic Arab world, the chapters range from the story of Muhammad and his Companions, to the development of Islamic religion and culture and the empires that grew from it, to the influence that Islam has on today's world. The book covers a wide array of subjects, casting light on topics such as the historical encounter of Islam and Christianity, the role of Islam in the Mughal and Ottoman empires, the growth of Islam in Southeast Asia, China, and Africa, the political, economic, and religious challenges of European imperialism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and Islamic communities in the modern Western world. In addition, the book offers excellent articles on Islamic religion, art and architecture, and sciences as well as bibliographies. Events in the contemporary world have led to an explosion of interest and scholarly work on Islam. Written for the general reader but also appealing to specialists, The Oxford History of Islam offers the best of that recent scholarship, presented in a readable style and complemented by a rich variety of illustrations.

The Oxford University Press

An Informal History

Author: Peter H. Sutcliffe

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199510849

Category: History

Page: 303

View: 4297

Oxford University Press is one of the oldest and best-known publishing houses in the world. This history, originally published to mark 500 years of printing in Oxford, traces the transformation of the Press from a lucrative Bible house into a great national and international publishing business. Great names in the early history of the Press, like Laud, Fell, and Blackstone, laid sound foundations, but as late as 1870 it was thought necessary to remind the Delegates that publishing bookswas not 'entirely beside their function'. Even in the 1890s there were still those prepared to censure the University for allowing its Press to publish the secular and profane literature of Spenser, Marlowe, and Shakespeare.

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church

Author: Frank Leslie Cross,Elizabeth A. Livingstone

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0192802909

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1800

View: 7573

Uniquely authoritative and wide-ranging in its scope, The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church is the indispensable one-volume reference work on all aspects of the Christian Church. It contains over 6,000 cross-referenced A-Z entries, and offers unrivalled coverage of all aspects of thisvast and often complex subject, from theology; churches and denominations; patristic scholarship; and the bible; to the church calendar and its organization; popes; archbishops; saints; and mystics. In this revision, innumerable small changes have been made to take into account shifts in scholarly opinion, recent developments, such as the Church of England's new prayer book (Common Worship), RC canonizations, ecumenical advances and mergers, and, where possible, statistics. A number of existingarticles have been rewritten to reflect new evidence or understanding, for example the Holy Sepulchre entry, and there are a few new articles, on Desmond Tutu and Padre Pio, for example. Perhaps most significantly, a great number of the bibliographies have been updated. Established since its first appearance in 1957 as an essential resource for ordinands, clergy, and members of religious orders; ODCC is an invaluable tool for academics, teachers, and students of church history and theology, as well as for the general reader. THEOLOGY- the development of doctrines throughout the ages, with their philosophical background and the different traditions of the major Churches- spirituality and heresy- history of the Reformation and Counter-ReformationPATRISTIC SCHOLARSHIP: Fathers of the Church, on whose work later theology is founded, are covered in detail, for example- the Nag Hammadi papyri and their significance for our understanding of Gnosticism- the problems of Marcarius of Egypt and Macarius/Simeon are explored- the recently discovered sermons of Augustine are mentioned, with their places of publication listedCHURCHES AND DENOMINATIONS- the beliefs and structures of both the mainstream and lesser-known denominations such as Amish, Muggletonians, Shakers, and Wee Frees- lengthy articles on the history of Christianity throughout the world, in countries such as Angola, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, the Philippines, Poland, Spain, the United States, Vietnam, and ZaireTHE CHURCH CALENDAR AND ORGANIZATION- feast and saints' days- Sacraments- church services, offices, rites, and practices- canon law including Catholic revision- councils and synods- religious ordersTHE BIBLE- individual Biblical Books- major figures from Abraham, Moses, and King David to St Paul and the Evangelists- schools of Biblical criticism and entries on their chief exponentsBIOGRAPHICAL ENTRIES- these are wide ranging and include saints, popes, patriarchs, and archbishops- emperors, kings, and other rulers- mystics, heretics, and reformers- theologians and philosophers, with a summary of their opinions- artists, poets, and musicians

The Oxford History of Byzantium

Author: Cyril Mango

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191500828

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 3828

The Oxford History of Byzantium is the only history to provide in concise form detailed coverage of Byzantium from its Roman beginnings to the fall of Constantinople and assimilation into the Turkish Empire. Lively essays and beautiful illustrations portray the emergence and development of a distinctive civilization, covering the period from the fourth century to the mid-fifteenth century. The authors - all working at the cutting edge of their particular fields - outline the political history of the Byzantine state and bring to life the evolution of a colourful culture. In AD 324, the Emperor Constantine the Great chose Byzantion, an ancient Greek colony at the mouth of the Thracian Bosphorous, as his imperial residence. He renamed the place 'Constaninopolis nova Roma', 'Constantinople, the new Rome' and the city (modern Istanbul) became the Eastern capital of the later Roman empire. The new Rome outlived the old and Constantine's successors continued to regard themselves as the legitimate emperors of Rome, just as their subjects called themselves Romaioi, or Romans long after they had forgotten the Latin language. In the sixteenth century, Western humanists gave this eastern Roman empire ruled from Constantinople the epithet 'Byzantine'. Against a backdrop of stories of emperors, intrigues, battles, and bishops, this Oxford History uncovers the hidden mechanisms - economic, social, and demographic - that underlay the history of events. The authors explore everyday life in cities and villages, manufacture and trade, machinery of government, the church as an instrument of state, minorities, education, literary activity, beliefs and superstitions, monasticism, iconoclasm, the rise of Islam, and the fusion with Western, or Latin, culture. Byzantium linked the ancient and modern worlds, shaping traditions and handing down to both Eastern and Western civilization a vibrant legacy.

The Oxford History of Protestant Dissenting Traditions - The Nineteenth Century

Author: Timothy Larsen,Michael Ledger-Lomas

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199683719

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 5313

The five-volume Oxford History of Dissenting Protestant Traditions series is governed by a motif of migration ("out-of-England"). It first traces organized church traditions that arose in England as Dissenters distanced themselves from a state church defined by diocesan episcopacy, the Book of Common Prayer, the Thirty-Nine Articles, and royal supremacy, but then follows those traditions as they spread beyond England -and also traces newer traditions that emerged downstream in other parts of the world from earlier forms of Dissent. Secondly, it does the same for the doctrines, church practices, stances toward state and society, attitudes toward Scripture, and characteristic patterns of organization that also originated in earlier English Dissent, but that have often defined a trajectory of influence independent ecclesiastical organizations. The Oxford History of Protestant Dissenting Traditions, Volume III considers the Dissenting traditions of the United Kingdom, the British Empire, and the United States in the nineteenth century. It provides an overview of the historiography on Dissent while making the case for seeing Dissenters in different Anglophone connections as interconnected and conscious of their genealogical connections. The nineteenth century saw the creation of a vast Anglo-world which also brought Anglophone Dissent to its apogee. Featuring contributions from a team of leading scholars, the volume illustrates that in most parts of the world the later nineteenth century was marked by a growing enthusiasm for the moral and educational activism of the state which plays against the idea of Dissent as a static, purely negative identity. This collection shows that Dissent was a political and constitutional identity, which was often only strong where a dominant Church of England existed to dissent against.

The Oxford Handbook of Theology, Sexuality, and Gender

Author: Adrian Thatcher

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199664153

Category: Religion

Page: 719

View: 9206

The Oxford Handbook of Theology, Sexuality, and Gender presents an unrivalled overview of the theological study of sexuality and gender. These topics are not merely contentious and pervasive: they have escalated in importance within theology. Theologians increasingly agree that even the very doctrine of God cannot be contemplated without a prior grappling with each. Featuring 41 newly-commissioned essays, written by some of the foremost scholars in the discipline, this authoritative collection presents and develops the latest thinking in these areas. Divided into eight thematic sections, the Handbook explores: methodological approaches; contributions from neighbouring disciplines; sexuality and gender in the Bible, and in the Christian tradition; controversies within the churches, and within four of the non-Christian faiths; and key concepts and issues. The final, extended section considers theology in relation to married people and families; gay and lesbian people; bisexual people; intersex and transgender people; disabled people; and to friends. This volume is an essential reference for students and scholars, which will also stimulate further research.

The Oxford History of Ireland

Author: R. F. Foster,Robert Fitzroy Foster

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780192802026

Category: History

Page: 346

View: 8613

Under the editorship of R. F. Foster, a team of distinguished Irish historians has produced a challenging assessment of Ireland's history, invaluable for the student and general reader alike. Their approach stresses the ancient, rooted nature of Irish culture, but also looks beyond receivedideas of Irish history to explore the patterns of fragmentation and change which have been characteristic of Ireland's past. The long-contested question of Irish identity and its relation to language is also fruitfully examined. The text of this book, originally published in The Oxford IllustratedHistory of Ireland, is usefully supplemented with a chronology of Irish history, maps, and suggestions for further reading.

The Oxford History of Anglicanism

Reformation and Identity C. 1520-1662

Author: Anthony Milton

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199639736

Category:

Page: 544

View: 6619

The Oxford History of Anglicanism is a major new and unprecedented international study of the identity and historical influence of one of the world's largest versions of Christianity. This global study of Anglicanism from the sixteenth century looks at how was Anglican identity constructed and contested at various periods since the sixteenth century; and what was its historical influence during the past six centuries. It explores not just the ecclesiastical and theological aspects of global Anglicanism, but also the political, social, economic, and cultural influences of this form of Christianity that has been historically significant in western culture, and a burgeoning force in non-western societies today. The chapters are written by international experts in their various historical fields which includes the most recent research in their areas, as well as original research. The series forms an invaluable reference for both scholars and interested non-specialists. Volume one of The Oxford History of Anglicanism examines a period when the nature of "Anglicanism" was still heavily contested. Rather than merely tracing the emergence of trends that we associate with later Anglicanism, the contributors instead discuss the fluid and contested nature of the Church of England's religious identity in these years, and the different claims to what should count as "Anglican" orthodoxy. After the introduction and narrative chapters explain the historical background, individual chapters then analyze different understandings of the early church and church history; variant readings of the meaning of the royal supremacy, the role of bishops and canon law, and cathedrals; the very diverse experiences of religion in parishes, styles of worship and piety, church decoration, and Bible usage; and the competing claims to "Anglican" orthodoxy of puritanism, "avant-garde conformity" and Laudianism. Also analyzed are arguments over the Church of England's confessional identity and its links with the foreign Reformed Churches, and the alternative models provided by English Protestant activities in Ireland, Scotland and North America. The reforms of the 1640s and 1650s are included in their own right, and the volume concludes that the shape of the Restoration that emerged was far from inevitable, or expressive of a settled "Anglican" identity.