The Complete Odes

Author: Pindar,Stephen Instone

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0192805533

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 186

View: 4583

The Greek poet Pindar (c. 518-428 BC) composed victory odes for winners in the ancient Games, including the Olympics. The Odes contain versions of some of the best known Greek myths and are also a valuable source for Greek religion and ethics. Verity's lucid translations are complemented by insights into competition, myth, and meaning. - ;'we can speak of no greater contest than Olympia' The Greek poet Pindar (c. 518-428 BC) composed victory odes for winners in the ancient Games, including the Olympics. He celebrated the victories of athletes competing in foot races, horse races, boxing, wrestling, all-in fighting and the pentathlon, and his Odes are fascinating not only for their poetic qualities, but for what they tell us about the Games. Pindar praises the victor by comparing him to mythical heroes and the gods, but also reminds the athlete of his human limitations. The Odes contain versions of some of the best known Greek myths, such as Jason and the Argonauts, and Perseus and Medusa, and are a valuable source for Greek religion and ethics. Pindar's startling use of language - striking metaphors, bold syntax, enigmatic expressions - makes reading his poetry a uniquely rewarding experience. Anthony Verity's lucid translations are complemented by an introduction and notes that provide insight into competition, myth, and meaning. -

Hesiod

The Homeric Hymns, and Homerica

Author: Hesiod

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 627

View: 776


Six Tragedies

Author: Lucius Annaeus Seneca,Emily Wilson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192807064

Category: Drama

Page: 240

View: 1333

This is a lively, readable and accurate verse translation of the six best plays by one of the most influential of all classical Latin writers. The volume includes Phaedra, Oedipus, Medea, Trojan Women, Hercules Furens, and Thyestes, together with an invaluable introduction and notes.

The Iliad

Author: Homer,

Publisher: First Avenue Editions

ISBN: 1467775606

Category: Poetry

Page: 654

View: 9212

The tenth and final year of the Trojan War comes to its climactic end in this infamous Greek epic. With the mighty Achilles brooding on the sidelines of the battle, the Greek army faces almost certain defeat. At the mercy of the intervening gods of Mount Olympus, the legendary warriors of Greece and Troy fight to the death in the name of honor, love, and vengeance. Originally written around 750 BCE, the authorship of this epic poem remains uncertain, but most scholars ascribe it to a blind Greek poet named Homer. William Cowper first published his translation in 1791; this unabridged edition comes from the work edited by Robert Southey, LL.D., with notes by M. A. Dwight, which was published in 1860.

The Odyssey

Author: Homer,Walter Shewring

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780192833754

Category: Poetry

Page: 349

View: 6875

Presents the classic poem concerning the wanderings of the hero Odysseus and his miraculous return to Ithaca and a faithful wife

Selected Tales

Author: Edgar Allan Poe

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141925434

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 8866

Since their first publication in the 1830s and 1840s, Edgar Allan Poe's extraordinary Gothic tales have established themselves as classics of horror fiction and have also created many of the conventions which still dominate the genre of detective fiction. As well as being highly enjoyable, Poe's tales are works of very real intellectual exploration. Attentive to the historical and political dimensions of these very American tales, this new selection places the most popular -- `The Fall of the House of Usher', `The Masque of the Red Death', `The Murders in the Rue Morgue; and `The Purloined Letter' -- alongside less well-known travel narratives, metaphysical essays and political satires.

The Library of Greek Mythology

Author: Apollodorus

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780192839244

Category: Fiction

Page: 291

View: 934

A new translation of an important text for Greek mythology used as a source book by classicists from antiquity to Robert Graves, The Library of Greek Mythology is a complete summary of early Greek myth, telling the story of each of the great families of heroic mythology, and the various adventures associated with the main heroes and heroines, from Jason and Perseus to Heracles and Helen of Troy. Using the ancient system of detailed histories of the great families, it contains invaluable genealogical diagrams for maximum clarity.

Sir Gawain and The Green Knight

Author: Keith Harrison,Helen Cooper

Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks

ISBN: 0199540160

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 160

View: 5015

Sir Gawain and The Green Knight, with its intricate plot of enchantment and betrayal is probably the most skilfully told story in the whole of the English Arthurian cycle. Originating from the north-west midlands of England, it is based on two separate and very ancient Celtic motifs of the Beheading and the Exchange of Winnings, brought together by the anonymous 14th century author. Acclaimed poet Keith Harrison's new translation uses a modernalliterative pattern which subtly echoes the music of the original at the same time as it strives for fidelity. This is the most generously annotated edition available, complete with a detailed introduction whichsituates the work in the context of Arthurian Romance as well as analysing its poetics and narrative structure.

Gothic Tales

Author: Arthur Conan Doyle

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192571664

Category: Literary Collections

Page: N.A

View: 8511

'There was a rumour, too, that he was a devil-worshipper, or something of that sort, and also that he had the evil eye...' Arthur Conan Doyle was the greatest genre writer Britain has ever produced. Throughout a long writing career, he drew on his own medical background, his travels, and his increasing interest in spiritualism and the occult to produce a spectacular array of Gothic Tales. Many of Doyle's writings are recognised as the very greatest tales of terror. They range from hauntings in the polar wasteland to evil surgeons and malevolent jungle landscapes. This collection brings together over thirty of Conan Doyle's best Gothic Tales. Darryl Jones's introduction discusses the contradictions in Conan Doyle's very public life - as a medical doctor who became obsessed with the spirit world, or a British imperialist drawn to support Irish Home Rule - and shows the ways in which these found articulation in that most anxious of all literary forms, the Gothic.

ULYSSES

A Modern Classic

Author: James Joyce

Publisher: Musaicum Books

ISBN: 8075839854

Category: Fiction

Page: 900

View: 8499

Ulysses is a modernist novel by Irish writer James Joyce. It is considered to be one of the most important works of modernist literature, and has been called "a demonstration and summation of the entire movement". Ulysses chronicles the peripatetic appointments and encounters of Leopold Bloom in Dublin in the course of an ordinary day, 16 June 1904. Ulysses is the Latinised name of Odysseus, the hero of Homer's epic poem Odyssey, and the novel establishes a series of parallels between its characters and events and those of the poem (the correspondence of Leopold Bloom to Odysseus, Molly Bloom to Penelope, and Stephen Dedalus to Telemachus). Joyce divided Ulysses into 18 chapters or "episodes". At first glance much of the book may appear unstructured and chaotic; Joyce once said that he had "put in so many enigmas and puzzles that it will keep the professors busy for centuries arguing over what I meant", which would earn the novel "immortality". James Joyce (1882-1941) was an Irish novelist and poet, considered to be one of the most influential writers in the modernist avant-garde of the early 20th century. Joyce is best known for Ulysses, the short-story collection Dubliners, and the novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Finnegans Wake.

Classical Literature: A Very Short Introduction

Author: William Allan

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 019164336X

Category: Fiction

Page: 144

View: 906

From popular histories through to reworkings of classical subject matter by contemporary poets, dramatists, and novelists, the classical world and the masterpieces of its literature continue to fascinate readers and audiences in a huge variety of media. In this Very Short Introduction, William Allan explores what the 'classics' are and why they continue to shape our Western concepts of literature. Presenting a range of material from both Greek and Latin literature, he illustrates the variety and sophistication of these works, and considers examples from all the major genres. Ideal for the general reader interested in works of classic literature, as well as students at A-Level and University, this is a lively and lucid guide to the major authors and literary forms of the ancient period. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

Pañcatantra

The Book of India's Folk Wisdom

Author: Patrick Olivelle

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199555753

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 8561

The Pancatantra is the most famous collection of fables in India and was one of the earliest Indian books to be translated into Western languages. No other work of Indian literature has had a greater influence on world literature, and no other collection of stories has become as popular in India itself. The Pancatantra teaches the principles of good government and public policy through the medium of animal stories, providing a window on toancient Indian society. Its positive attitude towards life and its advocacy of ambition, enterprise, and drive are a salutary antidote to the pious pronouncements about the passivity and other-worldliness of ancient Indiansociety and religion.

The Andromache and Euripidean Tragedy

Author: William Allan

Publisher: Clarendon Press

ISBN: 0191541567

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 322

View: 5413

The Andromache has long been disparaged despite being a brilliant piece of theatre. In this book Dr Allan draws attention to the neglected artistry of this very impressive and intriguing text. Through careful analysis the Andromache emerges as a play that poses fundamental questions, especially about the polarity of Greek and barbarian, and the morality of the gods. Dr Allan shows how the play also challenges revenge as a motive for action, and explores the role of women as wives, mothers, and victims of war, be they Greek or Trojan, victorious or defeated. These are among the central concerns that make the Andromache a moving and thought-provoking tragedy, full of suffering, suspense, and moral interest. This book contributes both to an appreciation of the Andromache in its own right, and to a wider understanding of the variety and quality of Euripides' uvre.

Alexander the Great

Author: Ulrich Wilcken

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN: 1787202585

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 3940

“ALEXANDER THE GREAT opened a new era in the history of the world, and by his life’s work determined its development for many centuries. He is conspicuous among the great men of history, because this work was accomplished in so short a span; when he died, he had not yet reached his thirty-third year. It was as a great conqueror that he impressed the popular imagination of every race. He subdued the East and penetrated into India, that land of wonders. The legend about him, equally current in East and West, took him to the limits of the earth and even to the gates of Paradise. The permanent result of his life, however, was not the empire which he won by hard fighting, but the development of Greek civilisation into a civilisation which was worldwide. It is in this way that his influence has affected the history of mankind even down to our own time. He had first to create his empire; the decision of the battlefield had, as usual, to produce the external conditions for the new civilisation.” Originally published in 1932, Ulrich Wilcken’s distinguished biography of Alexander the Great is widely regarded as a classic, perfectly capturing Alexander’s true achievements and influence. Translated from German by G. C. Richards, Professor of Greek and Classical Literature at Oriel College, Oxford University.

The Kalevala

Author: Elias Lönnrot

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191637726

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 736

View: 4837

The Kalevala is the great Finnish epic, which like the Iliad and the Odyssey, grew out of a rich oral tradition with prehistoric roots. During the first millenium of our era, speakers of Uralic languages (those outside the Indo-European group) who had settled in the Baltic region of Karelia, that straddles the border of eastern Finland and north-west Russia, developed an oral poetry that was to last into the nineteenth century. This poetry provided the basis of the Kalevala. It was assembled in the 1840s by the Finnish scholar Elias Lönnrot, who took `dictation' from the performance of a folk singer, in much the same way as our great collections from the past, from Homeric poems to medieval songs and epics, have probably been set down. Published in 1849, it played a central role in the march towards Finnish independence and inspired some of Sibelius's greatest works. This new and exciting translation by poet Keith Bosley, prize-winning translator of the anthology Finnish Folk Poetry: Epic, is the first truly to combine liveliness with accuracy in a way which reflects the richness of the original. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

The return of Odysseus

Author: I. M. Richardson,Hal Frenck,Homer

Publisher: Troll Communications Llc

ISBN: 9780816700165

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 31

View: 5860

Odysseus returns at last to Ithaca where he rids his house of the evil suitors, is reunited with Penelope, and visits his aging, grieving father.

The World of Odysseus

Author: Moses I. Finley

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 1590170172

Category: History

Page: 205

View: 9571

The World of Odysseus is a concise and penetrating account of the society that gave birth to the Iliad and the Odyssey--a book that provides a vivid picture of the Greek Dark Ages, its men and women, works and days, morals and values. Long celebrated as a pathbreaking achievement in the social history of the ancient world, M.I. Finley's brilliant study remains, as classicist Bernard Knox notes in his introduction to this new edition, "as indispensable to the professional as it is accessible to the general reader"--a fundamental companion for students of Homer and Homeric Greece.

Homer and the Poetics of Hades

Author: George Alexander Gazis

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019878726X

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 737

Homer and the Poetics of Hades offers a new and unique approach to the Iliad and, more particularly, the Odyssey through an exploration of the role and function of the Underworld as a poetic resource permitting an alternative perspective on the epic past. By portraying Hades as a realm where vision is not possible, Homer creates a unique poetic environment in which social constraints and divine prohibitions do not apply, resulting in a narrative which emulates that of the Muses but which at the same time is markedly distinct from it. In Hades experimentation with, and alteration of, important epic forms and values can be pursued with greater freedom, giving rise to a different kind of poetics: the 'poetics of Hades'. In the Iliad, Homer offers us a glimpse of how this alternative poetics works through the visit of Patroclus' shade in Achilles' dream. The recollection offered by the shade reveals an approach to its past in which regret, self-pity, and a lingering memory of intimate and emotional moments displace an objective tone and traditional exposition of heroic values. However, the potential of Hades for providing alternative means of commemorating the past is more fully explored in the 'Nekyia' of Odyssey 11: there, Odysseus' extraordinary ability to see the dead in Hades allows him to meet and interview the shades of heroines and heroes of the epic past, while the absolute confinement of Hades allows the shades to recount their stories from their own personal points of view. The poetic implications are significant, since by visiting Hades and listening to the stories of the shades Odysseus, and Homer with him, gain access to a tradition in which epic values associated with gender roles and even divine law are suspended in favour of a more immediate and personally inflected approach to the epic past. As readers, this alternative poetics offers us more than just a revised framework within which to navigate the Iliad and the Odyssey, inviting as it does a more nuanced understanding of the Greeks' anxieties around mortality and posthumous fame.

Homer and the Odyssey

Author: Suzanne Saïd,Ruth Webb

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199542848

Category: History

Page: 420

View: 2553

With an introduction to the oral tradition which lay at the source of the Homeric epics and a discussion on the reception of the Homeric poems in Antiquity, this volume explores the mysterious figure of Homer, an author about whom little is known. Ruth Webb's translation is a revised and much expanded version of the original French text.