The Mexico Reader

History, Culture, Politics

Author: Gilbert M. Joseph,Timothy J. Henderson

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822384094

Category: History

Page: 808

View: 2731

The Mexico Reader is a vivid introduction to muchos Méxicos—the many Mexicos, or the many varied histories and cultures that comprise contemporary Mexico. Unparalleled in scope and written for the traveler, student, and expert alike, the collection offers a comprehensive guide to the history and culture of Mexico—including its difficult, uneven modernization; the ways the country has been profoundly shaped not only by Mexicans but also by those outside its borders; and the extraordinary economic, political, and ideological power of the Roman Catholic Church. The book looks at what underlies the chronic instability, violence, and economic turmoil that have characterized periods of Mexico’s history while it also celebrates the country’s rich cultural heritage. A diverse collection of more than eighty selections, The Mexico Reader brings together poetry, folklore, fiction, polemics, photoessays, songs, political cartoons, memoirs, satire, and scholarly writing. Many pieces are by Mexicans, and a substantial number appear for the first time in English. Works by Octavio Paz and Carlos Fuentes are included along with pieces about such well-known figures as the larger-than-life revolutionary leaders Pancho Villa and Emiliano Zapata; there is also a comminiqué from a more recent rebel, Subcomandante Marcos. At the same time, the book highlights the perspectives of many others—indigenous peoples, women, politicians, patriots, artists, soldiers, rebels, priests, workers, peasants, foreign diplomats, and travelers. The Mexico Reader explores what it means to be Mexican, tracing the history of Mexico from pre-Columbian times through the country’s epic revolution (1910–17) to the present day. The materials relating to the latter half of the twentieth century focus on the contradictions and costs of postrevolutionary modernization, the rise of civil society, and the dynamic cross-cultural zone marked by the two thousand-mile Mexico-U.S. border. The editors have divided the book into several sections organized roughly in chronological order and have provided brief historical contexts for each section. They have also furnished a lengthy list of resources about Mexico, including websites and suggestions for further reading.

The Cuba Reader

History, Culture, Politics

Author: Aviva Chomsky,Pamela Maria Smorkaloff,Barry Carr

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822384914

Category: History

Page: 736

View: 4670

Cuba is often perceived in starkly black and white terms—either as the site of one of Latin America’s most successful revolutions or as the bastion of the world’s last communist regime. The Cuba Reader multiplies perspectives on the nation many times over, presenting more than one hundred selections about Cuba’s history, culture, and politics. Beginning with the first written account of the island, penned by Christopher Columbus in 1492, the selections assembled here track Cuban history from the colonial period through the ascendancy of Fidel Castro to the present. The Cuba Reader combines songs, paintings, photographs, poems, short stories, speeches, cartoons, government reports and proclamations, and pieces by historians, journalists, and others. Most of these are by Cubans, and many appear for the first time in English. The writings and speeches of José Martí, Fernando Ortiz, Fidel Castro, Alejo Carpentier, Che Guevera, and Reinaldo Arenas appear alongside the testimonies of slaves, prostitutes, doctors, travelers, and activists. Some selections examine health, education, Catholicism, and santería; others celebrate Cuba’s vibrant dance, music, film, and literary cultures. The pieces are grouped into chronological sections. Each section and individual selection is preceded by a brief introduction by the editors. The volume presents a number of pieces about twentieth-century Cuba, including the events leading up to and following Castro’s January 1959 announcement of revolution. It provides a look at Cuba in relation to the rest of the world: the effect of its revolution on Latin America and the Caribbean, its alliance with the Soviet Union from the 1960s until the collapse of the Soviet bloc in 1989, and its tumultuous relationship with the United States. The Cuba Reader also describes life in the periodo especial following the cutoff of Soviet aid and the tightening of the U.S. embargo. For students, travelers, and all those who want to know more about the island nation just ninety miles south of Florida, The Cuba Reader is an invaluable introduction.

Encyclopedia of Global Religion

Author: Mark Juergensmeyer,Wade Clark Roof

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 0761927298

Category: Computers

Page: 1469

View: 3326

Presents entries A to L of a two-volume encyclopedia discussing religion around the globe, including biographies, concepts and theories, places, social issues, movements, texts, and traditions.

The Costa Rica Reader

History, Culture, Politics

Author: Steven Palmer,Iván Molina

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822382814

Category: History

Page: 398

View: 3971

Long characterized as an exceptional country within Latin America, Costa Rica has been hailed as a democratic oasis in a continent scorched by dictatorship and revolution; the ecological mecca of a biosphere laid waste by deforestation and urban blight; and an egalitarian, middle-class society blissfully immune to the violent class and racial conflicts that have haunted the region. Arguing that conceptions of Costa Rica as a happy anomaly downplay its rich heritage and diverse population, The Costa Rica Reader brings together texts and artwork that reveal the complexity of the country’s past and present. It characterizes Costa Rica as a site of alternatives and possibilities that undermine stereotypes about the region’s history and challenge the idea that current dilemmas facing Latin America are inevitable or insoluble. This essential introduction to Costa Rica includes more than fifty texts related to the country’s history, culture, politics, and natural environment. Most of these newspaper accounts, histories, petitions, memoirs, poems, and essays are written by Costa Ricans. Many appear here in English for the first time. The authors are men and women, young and old, scholars, farmers, workers, and activists. The Costa Rica Reader presents a panoply of voices: eloquent working-class raconteurs from San José’s poorest barrios, English-speaking Afro-Antilleans of the Limón province, Nicaraguan immigrants, factory workers, dissident members of the intelligentsia, and indigenous people struggling to preserve their culture. With more than forty images, the collection showcases sculptures, photographs, maps, cartoons, and fliers. From the time before the arrival of the Spanish, through the rise of the coffee plantations and the Civil War of 1948, up to participation in today’s globalized world, Costa Rica’s remarkable history comes alive. The Costa Rica Reader is a necessary resource for scholars, students, and travelers alike.

The Ecuador Reader

History, Culture, Politics

Author: Carlos de la Torre,Steve Striffler

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822390116

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 7931

Encompassing Amazonian rainforests, Andean peaks, coastal lowlands, and the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador’s geography is notably diverse. So too are its history, culture, and politics, all of which are examined from many perspectives in The Ecuador Reader. Spanning the years before the arrival of the Spanish in the early 1500s to the present, this rich anthology addresses colonialism, independence, the nation’s integration into the world economy, and its tumultuous twentieth century. Interspersed among forty-eight written selections are more than three dozen images. The voices and creations of Ecuadorian politicians, writers, artists, scholars, activists, and journalists fill the Reader, from José María Velasco Ibarra, the nation’s ultimate populist and five-time president, to Pancho Jaime, a political satirist; from Julio Jaramillo, a popular twentieth-century singer, to anonymous indigenous women artists who produced ceramics in the 1500s; and from the poems of Afro-Ecuadorians, to the fiction of the vanguardist Pablo Palacio, to a recipe for traditional Quiteño-style shrimp. The Reader includes an interview with Nina Pacari, the first indigenous woman elected to Ecuador’s national assembly, and a reflection on how to balance tourism with the protection of the Galápagos Islands’ magnificent ecosystem. Complementing selections by Ecuadorians, many never published in English, are samples of some of the best writing on Ecuador by outsiders, including an account of how an indigenous group with non-Inca origins came to see themselves as definitively Incan, an exploration of the fascination with the Andes from the 1700s to the present, chronicles of the less-than-exemplary behavior of U.S. corporations in Ecuador, an examination of Ecuadorians’ overseas migration, and a look at the controversy surrounding the selection of the first black Miss Ecuador.

The Chile Reader

History, Culture, Politics

Author: Elizabeth Quay Hutchison,Thomas Miller Klubock,Nara B. Milanich,Peter Winn

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822395835

Category: History

Page: 648

View: 4020

The Chile Reader makes available a rich variety of documents spanning more than five hundred years of Chilean history. Most of the selections are by Chileans; many have never before appeared in English. The history of Chile is rendered from diverse perspectives, including those of Mapuche Indians and Spanish colonists, peasants and aristocrats, feminists and military strongmen, entrepreneurs and workers, and priests and poets. Among the many selections are interviews, travel diaries, letters, diplomatic cables, cartoons, photographs, and song lyrics. Texts and images, each introduced by the editors, provide insights into the ways that Chile's unique geography has shaped its national identity, the country's unusually violent colonial history, and the stable but autocratic republic that emerged after independence from Spain. They shed light on Chile's role in the world economy, the social impact of economic modernization, and the enduring problems of deep inequality. The Reader also covers Chile's bold experiments with reform and revolution, its subsequent descent into one of Latin America's most ruthless Cold War dictatorships, and its much-admired transition to democracy and a market economy in the years since dictatorship.

The Colombia Reader

History, Culture, Politics

Author: Ann Farnsworth-Alvear,Marco Palacios,Ana María Gómez López

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822373866

Category: History

Page: 648

View: 7699

Containing over one hundred selections—most of them published in English for the first time—The Colombia Reader presents a rich and multilayered account of this complex nation from the colonial era to the present. The collection includes journalistic reports, songs, artwork, poetry, oral histories, government documents, and scholarship to illustrate the changing ways Colombians from all walks of life have made and understood their own history. Comprehensive in scope, it covers regional differences; religion, art, and culture; the urban/rural divide; patterns of racial, economic, and gender inequalities; the history of violence; and the transnational flows that have shaped the nation. The Colombia Reader expands readers' knowledge of Colombia beyond its reputation for violence, contrasting experiences of conflict with the stability and significance of cultural, intellectual, and economic life in this plural nation.

Der General in seinem Labyrinth

Author: Gabriel García Márquez

Publisher: Kiepenheuer & Witsch

ISBN: 346230867X

Category: Fiction

Page: 368

View: 1871

Sein Denkmal steht in fast jeder Stadt Lateinamerikas. Ein Staat, eine Währung, Straßen und Plätze sind nach ihm benannt. Simón Bolívar, der General und Held des Unabhängigkeitskrieges der südamerikanischen Kolonien gegen die spanische Krone, wird noch heute als der Libertador, der Befreier, verehrt. Der Bürgerssohn aus Caracas mit einem Schuß Mulattenblut in den Adern, der sich in Rom, Paris, London auskannte und in den Salons seiner Zeit glänzte, der Tausende von Büchern las, überquerte mehrfach die Anden und ritt mit seinen Soldaten Tausende von Meilen durch den Kontinent, um seine Vision von einem befreiten und vereinigten Südamerika zu verwirklichen. Er schrieb unermüdlich Briefe, persönliche und politische, er konnte ebenso unnachahmlich fechten wie tanzen und war ein unwiderstehlicher Bewunderer schöner Frauen. Über 10 Jahre erlebte er als Präsident des von ihm geschaffenen Staates Kolumbien die Höhen des Ruhms, aber auch die Niederungen korrumpierender Macht und die Angriffe seiner Gegner. 1830 erklärte Bolívar in Santa Fe de Bogota seinen Rücktritt. »Wer sich einer Revolution verschreibt, pflügt das Meer«, sagte er bitter am Ende seines Lebens, als der Traum von der Einheit zerstoben war und er schwerkrank mit wenigen Getreuen den Magdalena-Strom hinab zur Karibik fuhr, um möglicherweise ins Exil zu gehen. Gabriel García Márquez beschreibt in seinem Roman diese letzte Reise des 47jährigen Bolívar. In Rückblenden läßt er noch einmal den glorreichen Libertador auftreten, holt aber auch den General vom Denkmalssockel herunter und zeigt in einem spannungsreichen Geflecht historischer Ereignisse den Menschen in seinem körperlichen und seelischen Verfall, im Labyrinth seiner Leiden und verlorenen Träume.

No Man's Land

Leben an der mexikanischen Grenze

Author: Francisco Cantú

Publisher: Carl Hanser Verlag GmbH Co KG

ISBN: 3446261419

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 5824

Was Francisco Cantú an der amerikanisch-mexikanischen Grenze erlebt, bringt ihn fast um den Verstand. Cantú hat Politik studiert und wollte am eigenen Leib erfahren, was an der Grenze wirklich geschieht. Als Mitglied der United States Border Patrol rettet er Verdurstende aus der Wüste, deportiert aber auch illegale Einwanderer oder erlebt, wie Familien auseinandergerissen werden. In seiner persönlichen Reportage zeigt er, was Grenzen für die Menschen wirklich bedeuten. No Man’s Land mutet wie eine Tragödie an und bildet doch die Realität wahrheitsgetreu ab, unverzerrt, grausam und zutiefst berührend.

The Peru Reader

History, Culture, Politics

Author: Orin Starn,Carlos Iván Degregori,Robin Kirk

Publisher: Duke University Press Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 597

View: 5337

Sixteenth-century Spanish soldiers described Peru as a land filled with gold and silver, a place of untold wealth. Nineteenth-century travelers wrote of soaring Andean peaks plunging into luxuriant Amazonian canyons of orchids, pythons, and jaguars. The early-twentieth-century American adventurer Hiram Bingham told of the raging rivers and the wild jungles he traversed on his way to rediscovering the “Lost City of the Incas,” Machu Picchu. Seventy years later, news crews from ABC and CBS traveled to Peru to report on merciless terrorists, starving peasants, and Colombian drug runners in the “white gold” rush of the coca trade. As often as not, Peru has been portrayed in broad extremes: as the land of the richest treasures, the bloodiest conquest, the most poignant ballads, and the most violent revolutionaries. This revised and updated second edition of the bestselling Peru Reader offers a deeper understanding of the complex country that lies behind these claims. Unparalleled in scope, the volume covers Peru’s history from its extraordinary pre-Columbian civilizations to its citizens’ twenty-first-century struggles to achieve dignity and justice in a multicultural nation where Andean, African, Amazonian, Asian, and European traditions meet. The collection presents a vast array of essays, folklore, historical documents, poetry, songs, short stories, autobiographical accounts, and photographs. Works by contemporary Peruvian intellectuals and politicians appear alongside accounts of those whose voices are less often heard—peasants, street vendors, maids, Amazonian Indians, and African-Peruvians. Including some of the most insightful pieces of Western journalism and scholarship about Peru, the selections provide the traveler and specialist alike with a thorough introduction to the country’s astonishing past and challenging present.

The Oxford History of Mexico

Author: William Beezley,Michael Meyer

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199779937

Category: History

Page: 688

View: 669

The Oxford History of Mexico is a narrative history of the events, institutions and characters that have shaped Mexican history from the reign of the Aztecs through the twenty-first century. When the hardcover edition released in 2000, it was praised for both its breadth and depth--all aspects of Mexican history, from religion to technology, ethnicity, ecology and mass media, are analyzed with insight and clarity. Available for the first time in paperback, the History covers every era in the nation's history in chronological format, offering a quick, affordable reference source for students, scholars and anyone who has ever been interested in Mexico's rich cultural heritage. Scholars have contributed fascinating essays ranging from thematic ("Faith and Morals in Colonial Mexico," "Mass Media and Popular Culture in the Postrevolutionary Era") to centered around one pivotal moment or epoch in Mexican history ("Betterment for Whom? The Reform Period: 1855-1875"). Two such major events are the Mexican War of Independence (1810-1821) and the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920), the subjects of several essays in the book. Publication of the reissued edition will coincide with anniversaries of these critical turning points. Essays are updated to reflect new discoveries, advances in scholarship, and occurences of the past decade. A revised glossary and index ensure that readers will have immediate access to any information they seek. William Beezley, co-editor of the original edition, has written a new preface that focuses on the past decade and covers such issues as immigration from Mexico to the United States and the democratization implied by the defeat of the official party in the 2000 and 2006 presidential elections. Beezley also explores the significance of the bicentennial of independence and centennial of the Revolution. With these updates and a completely modern, bold new design, the reissued edition refreshes the beloved Oxford History of Mexico for a new generation.

MultiCultural Review

Dedicated to a Better Understanding of Ethnic, Racial, and Religious Diversity

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Books

Page: N.A

View: 2697


Culture and Customs of Mexico

Author: Peter Standish,Steven M. Bell

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313304125

Category: Social Science

Page: 315

View: 7760

This book offers a deeper understanding of Mexico's history, institutions, religion, cultural output, leisure, and social customs.

Wir Tiere

Roman

Author: Justin Torres

Publisher: DVA

ISBN: 3641103177

Category: Fiction

Page: 176

View: 1132

Gewalt und Mitleid, Pathos und Humor – die aufregendste junge Stimme aus den USA Drei Brüder schlagen sich durch ihre Kindheit: Sie bewerfen sich gegenseitig mit Tomaten, bauen aus Müllsäcken Drachen, verstecken sich, wenn sich die Eltern anschreien, dreschen auf Paps und Ma ein, wenn diese lachen. Die Eltern, nur wenig älter als ihre Kinder, stammen aus Brooklyn – er ist Puerto Ricaner, sie eine Weiße –, und ihre Liebe ist eine ernsthafte, gefährliche Sache, die die Familie zusammenschweißt, sie aber auch immer wieder zerreißt. Laut ist es in diesem Haushalt und leidenschaftlich, die Jungs sind immer hungrig und wollen mehr: mehr Fleisch, mehr Krach, mehr Wärme, mehr Leben. »Wir Tiere« erkundet die ungestümen Jahre des Erwachsenwerdens – wie stark wir durch unsere ersten Bindungen geformt und wie wir schließlich mit Fluchtgeschwindigkeit in unsere Zukunft geschleudert werden.