The Lost Wolves of Japan

Author: Brett L. Walker

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295989939

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 360

View: 5254

Many Japanese once revered the wolf as Oguchi no Magami, or Large-Mouthed Pure God, but as Japan began its modern transformation wolves lost their otherworldly status and became noxious animals that needed to be killed. By 1905 they had disappeared from the country. In this spirited and absorbing narrative, Brett Walker takes a deep look at the scientific, cultural, and environmental dimensions of wolf extinction in Japan and tracks changing attitudes toward nature through Japan's long history. Grain farmers once worshiped wolves at shrines and left food offerings near their dens, beseeching the elusive canine to protect their crops from the sharp hooves and voracious appetites of wild boars and deer. Talismans and charms adorned with images of wolves protected against fire, disease, and other calamities and brought fertility to agrarian communities and to couples hoping to have children. The Ainu people believed that they were born from the union of a wolflike creature and a goddess. In the eighteenth century, wolves were seen as rabid man-killers in many parts of Japan. Highly ritualized wolf hunts were instigated to cleanse the landscape of what many considered as demons. By the nineteenth century, however, the destruction of wolves had become decidedly unceremonious, as seen on the island of Hokkaido. Through poisoning, hired hunters, and a bounty system, one of the archipelago's largest carnivores was systematically erased. The story of wolf extinction exposes the underside of Japan's modernization. Certain wolf scientists still camp out in Japan to listen for any trace of the elusive canines. The quiet they experience reminds us of the profound silence that awaits all humanity when, as the Japanese priest Kenko taught almost seven centuries ago, we "look on fellow sentient creatures without feeling compassion."

Toxic Archipelago

A History of Industrial Disease in Japan

Author: Brett L. Walker

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295803010

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 1763

Every person on the planet is entangled in a web of ecological relationships that link farms and factories with human consumers. Our lives depend on these relationships -- and are imperiled by them as well. Nowhere is this truer than on the Japanese archipelago. During the nineteenth century, Japan saw the rise of Homo sapiens industrialis, a new breed of human transformed by an engineered, industrialized, and poisonous environment. Toxins moved freely from mines, factory sites, and rice paddies into human bodies. Toxic Archipelago explores how toxic pollution works its way into porous human bodies and brings unimaginable pain to some of them. Brett Walker examines startling case studies of industrial toxins that know no boundaries: deaths from insecticide contaminations; poisonings from copper, zinc, and lead mining; congenital deformities from methylmercury factory effluents; and lung diseases from sulfur dioxide and asbestos. This powerful, probing book demonstrates how the Japanese archipelago has become industrialized over the last two hundred years -- and how people and the environment have suffered as a consequence.

A Concise History of Japan

Author: Brett L. Walker

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316239691

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 9948

To this day, Japan's modern ascendancy challenges many assumptions about world history, particularly theories regarding the rise of the west and why the modern world looks the way it does. In this engaging new history, Brett L. Walker tackles key themes regarding Japan's relationships with its minorities, state and economic development, and the uses of science and medicine. The book begins by tracing the country's early history through archaeological remains, before proceeding to explore life in the imperial court, the rise of the samurai, civil conflict, encounters with Europe, and the advent of modernity and empire. Integrating the pageantry of a unique nation's history with today's environmental concerns, Walker's vibrant and accessible new narrative then follows Japan's ascension from the ashes of World War II into the thriving nation of today. It is a history for our times, posing important questions regarding how we should situate a nation's history in an age of environmental and climatological uncertainties.

The Oxford Handbook of Environmental History

Author: Andrew C. Isenberg

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199394474

Category: Science

Page: 640

View: 593

The field of environmental history emerged just decades ago but has established itself as one of the most innovative and important new approaches to history, one that bridges the human and natural world, the humanities and the sciences. With the current trend towards internationalizing history, environmental history is perhaps the quintessential approach to studying subjects outside the nation-state model, with pollution, global warming, and other issues affecting the earth not stopping at national borders. With 25 essays, this Handbook is global in scope and innovative in organization, looking at the field thematically through such categories as climate, disease, oceans, the body, energy, consumerism, and international relations.

Bad Water

Nature, Pollution, and Politics in Japan, 1870–1950

Author: Robert Stolz

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822376504

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 1991

Bad Water is a sophisticated theoretical analysis of Japanese thinkers and activists' efforts to reintegrate the natural environment into Japan's social and political thought in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth. The need to incorporate nature into politics was revealed by a series of large-scale industrial disasters in the 1890s. The Ashio Copper Mine unleashed massive amounts of copper, arsenic, mercury, and other pollutants into surrounding watersheds. Robert Stolz argues that by forcefully demonstrating the mutual penetration of humans and nature, industrial pollution biologically and politically compromised the autonomous liberal subject underlying the political philosophy of the modernizing Meiji state. In the following decades, socialism, anarchism, fascism, and Confucian benevolence and moral economy were marshaled in the search for new theories of a modern political subject and a social organization adequate to the environmental crisis. With detailed considerations of several key environmental activists, including Tanaka Shōzō, Bad Water is a nuanced account of Japan's environmental turn, a historical moment when, for the first time, Japanese thinkers and activists experienced nature as alienated from themselves and were forced to rebuild the connections.

Die Wolfsfrau

die Kraft der weiblichen Urinstinkte

Author: Clarissa Pinkola Estés

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783453132269

Category: Archetype (Psychology)

Page: 560

View: 6429

Die Analyse von Mythen und Märchen aus verschiedenen Kulturkriesen durch die Psychoanalytikerin fördert Wesenszüge zu Tage, die Frauen zivilisationsbedingt eingebüsst haben.

The Art of Akaneiro

Author: American McGee,Spicy Horse Games

Publisher: Dark Horse Comics

ISBN: 1621157709

Category: Art

Page: 96

View: 2268

From the brilliant imagination of video game auteur American McGee comes a dazzling reenvisioning of Red Riding Hood set in the wondrous world of Japanese folklore! A young woman torn between two cultures takes on an epic adventure battling devious yokai for the fate of her world! Collects the three-issue miniseries. * Based on the hot new game by American McGee's Spicy Horse Games! * Written by Justin Aclin (Star Wars: The Clone Wars), and illustrated by Vasilis Lolos (Conan the Barbarian)!

The Genius of Dogs

Author: Brian Hare,Vanessa Woods

Publisher: Oneworld Publications

ISBN: 1780741367

Category: Pets

Page: 384

View: 6138

The journey began with a gut reaction. When award-winning scientist Dr Brian Hare watched a chimpanzee fail to read a simple human hand gesture in an intelligence test, he blurted out, ‘My dog can do that!’ The psychologist running the test challenged him to prove it, sending Hare on an odyssey to unlock the cognitive and evolutionary mysteries of our four-legged friends. Hare’s research over the past two decades has yielded startling discoveries about how dogs think. He has pioneered studies that have proven that dogs exhibit a brand of genius for getting along with people that is unique in the animal kingdom, and that when dogs domesticated themselves around 40,000 years ago they became far more like human infants than their wolf ancestors. These findings are transforming how we live and work with our canine friends, and how we understand them. Is your dog purposefully disobeying you? Probably, and often behind your back. Should you act like ‘top dog to maintain control? No, you’re better off displaying your friendliness – not just to your dog but to everyone around you. Which breed is cleverest? As it happens, breed doesn’t matter much, though other factors do. These are just some of the extraordinary insights to be found in The Genius of Dogs – the seminal book on how dogs evolved their unique intelligence alongside human companions, and how you can use this groundbreaking science to build a better relationship with your own dog.

Das Wunder der wilden Insel

Author: Peter Brown

Publisher: cbt Verlag

ISBN: 3641194466

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 288

View: 508

Preisgekrönt und bezaubernd: ein moderner Klassiker Als das Robotermädchen Roz erstmals die Augen öffnet, findet sie sich auf einer wilden, einsamen Insel wieder. Wie sie dorthin gekommen ist und warum, weiß sie nicht. Das Wetter und ein wilder Bär setzen ihr übel zu, und Roz begreift, dass sie sich ihrer Umgebung anpassen muss, wenn sie überleben will. Also beobachtet sie, erlernt die Sprache der Tiere und entdeckt, dass Freundlichkeit und Hilfsbereitschaft sie weiterbringen. Viele würden das Blechmonster zwar am liebsten verjagen, aber Roz gibt nicht auf. Sie zieht ein Gänseküken auf, und endlich fassen die Tiere Vertrauen. Als Roz dann in großer Gefahr schwebt, stehen sie ihr als Freunde bei.

Hokkaido

A History of Ethnic Transition and Development on Japan’s Northern Island

Author: Ann B. Irish

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786454652

Category: History

Page: 378

View: 6231

Japanese people have lived on the country's other three main islands—Honshu, Kyushu, and Shikoku—for many centuries, but ethnic Japanese, or Wajin, began coming to Hokkaido in large numbers only in the latter half of the nineteenth century. This book tells the story of Japan’s aboriginal people, the Ainu, followed by that of foreign explorers and ethnic Japanese pioneers. The book pays close attention to the Japanese-Russian conflicts over the island, including Cold War confrontations and more recent clashes over fishing rights and the Hokkaido-administered islands seized by the U.S.S.R. in 1945.

Vagina

Eine Geschichte der Weiblichkeit

Author: Naomi Wolf

Publisher: Rowohlt Verlag GmbH

ISBN: 3644002967

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 7756

Eine radikale und faszinierende Entdeckungsreise durch den Körper und die Seele von Frauen – von der Leitfigur des amerikanischen Feminismus. Die Vagina ist die Essenz der Weiblichkeit, davon ist Naomi Wolf überzeugt. Sie widmet sich nicht nur ihren sexuellen, sondern auch den kulturgeschichtlichen Aspekten. Welche Rolle spielt die Vagina in der Kunst? Inwieweit hat Pornografie unseren Blick auf den weiblichen Körper verändert? Welche Auswirkungen hat sexuelle Gewalt auf das Gehirn von Frauen? Weshalb muss heute die Vagina bestimmten Schönheitsidealen entsprechen? Naomi Wolf entschlüsselt, wie sehr der Umgang mit dem weiblichen Körper auch für den Umgang mit Frauen in unserer Gesellschaft steht.

Wolfskrieg

Author: Bernard Cornwell

Publisher: Rowohlt Verlag GmbH

ISBN: 3644406499

Category: Fiction

Page: 448

View: 6996

Ein Hilferuf aus Mercien erreicht den Krieger Uhtred. Er soll einer belagerten Stadt zur Hilfe kommen. Doch der Notruf war nur eine List, um ihn aus Northumbrien fortzulocken. Dort ist unterdessen ein furchtbarer Gegner eingefallen, der Nordmann Sköll Grimmarson, an seiner Seite ein gefürchteter Zauber und ein Heer von Úlfhéðnar: Wolfskriegern, die vor nichts zurückschrecken, wenn sie, von den Tränken und Salben des Zauberers befeuert, in die Schlacht reiten. Zurück in der Heimat erfährt Uhtred, dass Sköll seine Tochter getötet hat. Der Schmerz bringt ihn fast um. Doch wer Rache will, muss kühl und klug sein ...

Das dunkle Archiv

Roman

Author: Genevieve Cogman

Publisher: BASTEI LÜBBE

ISBN: 3732550206

Category: Fiction

Page: 432

View: 2827

Irene Winters hat die unsichtbare Bibliothek gerettet. Dummerweise hat sie dabei auch eine Reihe unersetzlicher Bücher verbrannt, weswegen ihre Bibliothekarskollegen und ihre Vorgesetzten sie nun mit Misstrauen beäugen. Daher zögert Irene nicht lange, als sie von einem Drachen gebeten wird, ein äußerst seltenes Buch zu suchen. Mit einem solchen Fund könnte sie ihren Ruf wiederherstellen. Nur leider nützt ihr das nichts, wenn sie tot ist. Und das verborgene Buch birgt ein tödliches Geheimnis ... Für Büchernarren, Bücherwürmer, Büchermenschen - Der vierte Band der SPIEGEL-Bestseller-Serie

The Republic of Nature

An Environmental History of the United States

Author: Mark Fiege

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295804149

Category: History

Page: 520

View: 7839

In the dramatic narratives that comprise The Republic of Nature, Mark Fiege reframes the canonical account of American history based on the simple but radical premise that nothing in the nation's past can be considered apart from the natural circumstances in which it occurred. Revisiting historical icons so familiar that schoolchildren learn to take them for granted, he makes surprising connections that enable readers to see old stories in a new light. Among the historical moments revisited here, a revolutionary nation arises from its environment and struggles to reconcile the diversity of its people with the claim that nature is the source of liberty. Abraham Lincoln, an unlettered citizen from the countryside, steers the Union through a moment of extreme peril, guided by his clear-eyed vision of nature's capacity for improvement. In Topeka, Kansas, transformations of land and life prompt a lawsuit that culminates in the momentous civil rights case of Brown v. Board of Education. By focusing on materials and processes intrinsic to all things and by highlighting the nature of the United States, Fiege recovers the forgotten and overlooked ground on which so much history has unfolded. In these pages, the nation's birth and development, pain and sorrow, ideals and enduring promise come to life as never before, making a once-familiar past seem new. The Republic of Nature points to a startlingly different version of history that calls on readers to reconnect with fundamental forces that shaped the American experience. For more information, visit the author's website: http://republicofnature.com/

A Family History of Illness

Memory as Medicine

Author: Brett L. Walker

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295743042

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 280

View: 2871

While in the ICU with a near-fatal case of pneumonia, Brett Walker was asked, �Do you have a family history of illness?��a standard and deceptively simple question that for Walker, a professional historian, took on additional meaning and spurred him to investigate his family�s medical past. In this deeply personal narrative, he constructs a history of his body to understand his diagnosis with a serious immunological disorder, weaving together his dying grandfather�s sneaking a cigarette in a shed on the family�s Montana farm, blood fractionation experiments in Europe during World War II, and nineteenth-century cholera outbreaks that ravaged small American towns as his ancestors were making their way west. A Family History of Illness is a gritty historical memoir that examines the body�s immune system and microbial composition as well as the biological and cultural origins of memory and history, offering a startling, fresh way to view the role of history in understanding our physical selves. In his own search, Walker soon realizes that this broader scope is more valuable than a strictly medical family history. He finds that family legacies shape us both physically and symbolically, forming the root of our identity and values, and he urges us to renew our interest in the past or risk misunderstanding ourselves and the world around us.

The Environmental Moment

1968-1972

Author: David Stradling

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295804742

Category: Nature

Page: 160

View: 826

The Environmental Moment is a collection of documents that reveal the significance of the years 1968-1972 to the environmental movement in the United States. With material ranging from short pieces from the Whole Earth Catalog and articles from the Village Voice to lectures, posters, and government documents, the collection describes the period through the perspective of a diversity of participants, including activists, politicians, scientists, and average citizens. Included are the words of Rachel Carson, but also the National Review, Howard Zahniser on wilderness, Nathan Hare on the Black underclass. The chronological arrangement reveals the coincidence of a multitude of issues that rushed into public consciousness during a critical time in American history.

Wilderburbs

Communities on Nature's Edge

Author: Lincoln Bramwell

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295805587

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 4462

Since the 1950s, the housing developments in the West that historian Lincoln Bramwell calls �wilderburbs� have offered residents both the pleasures of living in nature and the creature comforts of the suburbs. Remote from cities but still within commuting distance, nestled next to lakes and rivers or in forests and deserts, and often featuring spectacular views of public lands, wilderburbs celebrate the natural beauty of the American West and pose a vital threat to it. Wilderburbs tells the story of how roads and houses and water development have transformed the rural landscape in the West. Bramwell introduces readers to developers, homeowners, and government regulators, all of whom have faced unexpected environmental problems in designing and building wilderburb communities, including unpredictable water supplies, threats from wildfires, and encounters with wildlife. By looking at wilderburbs in the West, especially those in Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico, Bramwell uncovers the profound environmental consequences of Americans� desire to live in the wilderness.