The Long Weekend

Life in the English Country House, 1918-1939

Author: Adrian Tinniswood

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465098657

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 3203

From an acclaimed social and architectural historian, the tumultuous, scandalous, glitzy, and glamourous history of English country houses and high society during the interwar period

Behind the Throne

A Domestic History of the British Royal Household

Author: Adrian Tinniswood

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465094031

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 3475

An upstairs/downstairs history of the British royal court, from the Middle Ages to the reign of Queen Elizabeth II Monarchs: they're just like us. They entertain their friends and eat and worry about money. Henry VIII tripped over his dogs. George II threw his son out of the house. James I had to cut back on the alcohol bills. In Behind the Throne, historian Adrian Tinniswood uncovers the reality of five centuries of life at the English court, taking the reader on a remarkable journey from one Queen Elizabeth to another and exploring life as it was lived by clerks and courtiers and clowns and crowned heads: the power struggles and petty rivalries, the tension between duty and desire, the practicalities of cooking dinner for thousands and of ensuring the king always won when he played a game of tennis. A masterful and witty social history of five centuries of royal life, Behind the Throne offers a grand tour of England's grandest households.

The Verneys

A True Story of Love, War, and Madness in Seventeenth-Century England

Author: Adrian Tinniswood

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781594483097

Category: History

Page: 569

View: 5805

Traces the story of the seventeenth-century English family as drawn from their personal letters and other documents, discussing how their experiences reflected the realities of period gentry life, in an account that includes coverage of their relationships with Parliament and the royal family. Reprint.

The Rainborowes

One Family's Quest to Build a New England

Author: Adrian Tinniswood

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465069967

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 4712

The period between 1630 and 1660 was one of the most tumultuous in Western history. These three decades witnessed the birth of New England and, in the mother country, a chaotic civil war that rent the very fabric of English social, political, and religious life. At the center of this turbulent time was an outsized family: the Rainborowes. Shipmasters and soldiers, entrepreneurs and idealists, they bridged two worlds as they struggled to forge a better future for themselves and their kin. In The Rainborowes, acclaimed historian Adrian Tinniswood follows this singular clan from hectic London shipyards to remote Aegean islands, from muddy Boston streets to the bloodiest battles of the English Civil War, revealing their indelible mark on both America and England. A feat of historical reporting, The Rainborowes spans oceans and generations to describe a family—and a people—struggling to find its identity.

The Mistresses of Cliveden

Three Centuries of Scandal, Power, and Intrigue in an English Stately Home

Author: Natalie Livingstone

Publisher: Ballantine Books

ISBN: 0553392085

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 512

View: 1013

For fans of Downton Abbey comes an immersive historical epic about a lavish English manor and a dynasty of rich and powerful women who ruled the estate over three centuries of misbehavior, scandal, intrigue, and passion. Five miles from Windsor Castle, home of the royal family, sits the Cliveden estate. Overlooking the Thames, the mansion is flanked by two wings and surrounded by lavish gardens. Throughout its storied history, Cliveden has been a setting for misbehavior, intrigue, and passion—from its salacious, deadly beginnings in the seventeenth century to the 1960s Profumo Affair, the sex scandal that toppled the British government. Now, in this immersive chronicle, the manor’s current mistress, Natalie Livingstone, opens the doors to this prominent house and lets the walls do the talking. Built during the reign of Charles II by the Duke of Buckingham, Cliveden attracted notoriety as a luxurious retreat in which the duke could conduct his scandalous affair with the ambitious courtesan Anna Maria, Countess of Shrewsbury. In 1668, Anna Maria’s cuckolded husband, the Earl of Shrewsbury, challenged Buckingham to a duel. Buckingham killed Shrewsbury and claimed Anna Maria as his prize, making her the first mistress of Cliveden. Through the centuries, other enigmatic and indomitable women would assume stewardship over the estate, including Elizabeth, Countess of Orkney and illicit lover of William III, who became one of England’s wealthiest women; Augusta of Saxe-Gotha, the queen that Britain was promised and then denied; Harriet, Duchess of Sutherland, confidante of Queen Victoria and a glittering society hostess turned political activist; and the American-born Nancy Astor, the first female member of Parliament, who described herself as an “ardent feminist” and welcomed controversy. Though their privileges were extraordinary, in Livingstone’s hands, their struggles and sacrifices are universal. Cliveden weathered renovation and restoration, world conflicts and cold wars, societal shifts and technological advances. Rich in historical and architectural detail, The Mistresses of Cliveden is a tale of sex and power, and of the exceptional women who evaded, exploited, and confronted the expectations of their times. Praise for The Mistresses of Cliveden “Theatrical festivities, political jockeying and court intrigues are deftly described with a verve and attention to domestic comforts that show the author at her best. . . . [Livingstone’s] portraits of strenuous and assertive women who resisted subjection, sometimes deploying their sexual allure to succeed, on other occasions drawing on their husband’s wealth, are astute, spirited, and empathetic.”—The Wall Street Journal “Missing Downton Abbey already? This tome promises ‘three centuries of scandal, power, and intrigue’ and Natalie Livingstone definitely delivers.”—Good Housekeeping “Lively . . . The current chatelaine—the author herself—deserves no small credit for keeping the house’s legend alive. . . . Any of her action-filled chapters would merit a mini-series.”—The New York Times Book Review “Though the personal tales and tidbits are fascinating, and the sensational details of these women’s lives will intrigue Downton Abbey devotees, the real star of the story is Cliveden.”—Booklist “Lovers of modern English history and the scandals that infiltrated upper-crust society will find much to enjoy in this work.”—Library Journal From the Hardcover edition.

Life in the Country House in Georgian Ireland

Author: Patricia McCarthy

Publisher: Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art

ISBN: 9780300218862

Category: Country homes

Page: 272

View: 5467

"For aristocrats and gentry in 18th-century Ireland, the townhouses and country estates they resided in were carefully constructed to accommodate their cultivated lifestyles. Based on new research from Irish national collections and correspondence culled from papers in private keeping, this publication provides a vivid and engaging look at the various ways in which families tailored their homes to their personal needs and preferences. Halls were designed in order to simultaneously support a variety of activities, including dining, music, and games, while closed porches allowed visitors to arrive fully protected from the country's harsh weather. These grand houses were arranged in accordance with their residents' daily procedures, demonstrating a distinction between public and private spaces, and even keeping in mind the roles and arrangements of the servants in their purposeful layouts. With careful consideration given to both the practicality of everyday routine and the occasional special event, this book illustrates how the lives and residential structures of these aristocrats were inextricably woven together. "--

The Optimist's Daughter

Author: Eudora Welty

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 067972883X

Category: Fiction

Page: 180

View: 2091

Laurel Hand is forced to face her Southern past when she returns to Mississippi for her father's funeral

The Long Week-end

A Social History of Great Britain, 1918-1939

Author: Robert Graves,Alan Hodge

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393311365

Category: History

Page: 472

View: 4298

A classic social history by two distinguished writers who lived through the time. "The long week-end" is the authors' evocative phrase for the period in Great Britain's social history between the twin devastations of the Great War and World War II. From a postwar period of prosperity and frivolity through the ever-darkening decade of the thirties, The Long Week-End deftly and movingly preserves the details and captures the spirit of the time.

Children of the Sun

A Narrative of "decadence" in England After 1918

Author: Martin Green

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781604190014

Category: History

Page: 518

View: 407

Children of the Sun is a story of brilliant and later famous young people who deliberately chose decadence as an alternative lifestyle. The setting is England between World War I and World War II. The cast of characters includes Evelyn Waugh, Randolph Churchill, W. H. Auden, Christopher Isherwood, and Cecil Beaton among others.

The Polite Tourist

Four Centuries of Country House Visiting

Author: Adrian Tinniswood

Publisher: Abradale Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Architecture

Page: 224

View: 4305

Rebecca's Manderley, Jane Eyre's Thornfield, Pride and Prejudice's Pemberley -- just the names of these fictional English estates conjure up romantic images of majestic architecture, sweeping gardens, impressive artworks, and lavish interiors. This illustrated volume takes readers on a grand tour of the real-life counterparts to these fictional stately homes, and draws on letters, drawings, paintings, and journals to trace their appeal to visitors through four centuries. Visiting historic houses has a long tradition in England. Elizabethans marveled at royal and private palaces such as Hampton Court in Surrey and Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. Victorian sightseers took advantage of the brand-new railroad to see grand homes like Chatsworth and Knole, descending in droves on their elaborately landscaped grounds. Adrian Tinniswood explains the phenomenon of tourism and why millions continue to visit these and other country houses and their gardens, many of them maintained by the National Trust.

The Great Silence

1918-1920 Living in the Shadow of the Great War

Author: Juliet Nicolson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781552788899

Category: Great Britain

Page: 400

View: 3815

Peace at last, after Lloyd George declared it had been ‘the war to end all wars’, would surely bring relief and a renewed sense of optimism? But this assumption turned out to be deeply misplaced as people began to realise that the men they loved were never coming home. The Great Silence is the story of the pause between 1918 and 1920. A two-minute silence to celebrate those who died was underpinned by a more enduring silence born out of national grief. Those who had danced through settled Edwardian times, now faced a changed world. Some struggled to come to terms with the last four years, while others were anxious to move towards a new future. Change came to women, who were given the vote only five years after Emily Davidson had thrown herself on the ground at Ascot race course, to the poor, determined to tolerate their condition no longer, and to those permanently scarred, mentally and physically, by the conflict. The British Monarchy feared for its survival as monarchies around Europe collapsed and Eric Horne, one time butler to the gentry, found himself working in a way he considered unseemly for a servant of his calibre. Whether it was embraced or rejected, change had arrived as the impact of a tragic war was gradually absorbed. With her trademark focus on daily life, Juliet Nicolson evokes what England was like during this fascinating hinge in history.

The City's End

Two Centuries of Fantasies, Fears, and Premonitions of New York's Destruction

Author: Max Page

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 030011026X

Category: History

Page: 271

View: 3657

From nineteenth-century paintings of fires raging through New York City to scenes of Manhattan engulfed by a gigantic wave in the 1998 movie Deep Impact, images of the city’s end have been prolific and diverse. Why have Americans repeatedly imagined New York’s destruction? What do the fantasies of annihilation played out in virtually every form of literature and art mean? This book is the first to investigate two centuries of imagined cataclysms visited upon New York, and to provide a critical historical perspective to our understanding of the events of September 11, 2001. Max Page examines the destruction fantasies created by American writers and imagemakers at various stages of New York’s development. Seen in every medium from newspapers and films to novels, paintings, and computer software, such images, though disturbing, have been continuously popular. Page demonstrates with vivid examples and illustrations how each era’s destruction genre has reflected the city’s economic, political, racial, or physical tensions, and he also shows how the images have become forces in their own right, shaping Americans’ perceptions of New York and of cities in general.

Unseen

Unpublished Black History from the New York Times Photo Archives

Author: Dana Canedy,Darcy Eveleigh,Damien Cave,Rachel L. Swarns

Publisher: Black Dog & Leventhal

ISBN: 0316552976

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 9901

Hundreds of stunning images from black history have long been buried in The New York Times archives. None of them were published by The Times--until now. UNSEEN uncovers these never-before published photographs and tells the stories behind them. It all started with Times photo editor Darcy Eveleigh discovering dozens of these photographs. She and three colleagues, Dana Canedy, Damien Cave and Rachel L. Swarns, began exploring the history behind them, and subsequently chronicling them in a series entitled Unpublished Black History, that ran in print and online editions of The Times in February 2016. It garnered 1.7 million views on The Times website and thousands of comments from readers. This book includes those photographs and many more, among them: a 27-year-old Jesse Jackson leading an anti-discrimination rally of in Chicago, Rosa Parks arriving at a Montgomery Courthouse in Alabama a candid behind-the-scenes shot of Aretha Franklin backstage at the Apollo Theater, Ralph Ellison on the streets of his Manhattan neighborhood, the firebombed home of Malcolm X, Myrlie Evans and her children at the funeral of her slain husband , Medgar, a wheelchair-bound Roy Campanella at the razing of Ebbets Field. Were the photos--or the people in them--not deemed newsworthy enough? Did the images not arrive in time for publication? Were they pushed aside by words at an institution long known as the Gray Lady? Eveleigh, Canedy, Cave, and Swarms explore all these questions and more in this one-of-a-kind book. UNSEEN dives deep into The Times photo archives--known as the Morgue--to showcase this extraordinary collection of photographs and the stories behind them.

His Invention So Fertile : A Life of Christopher Wren

A Life of Christopher Wren

Author: Adrian Tinniswood

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0195348753

Category: Architecture

Page: 504

View: 7456

In His Invention So Fertile, Adrian Tinniswood offers the first biography of Christopher Wren in a generation. It is a book that reveals the full depth of Wren's multifaceted genius, not only as one of the greatest architects who ever lived--the designer of St. Paul's Cathedral--but as an influential seventeenth-century scientist. Tinniswood writes with insight and flair as he follows Wren from Wadham College, Oxford, through the turmoil of the English Civil War, to his role in helping to found the Royal Society--the intellectual and scientific heart of seventeenth-century England. The reader discovers that the great architect was initially an astronomer who was also deeply interested in medicine, physics, and mathematics. Family connections pulled him into architecture, with a commission to restore the chapel at Pembroke College, Cambridge. Tinniswood deftly follows Wren's rise as architect, capturing the atmosphere of Restoration London, as old Royalists scrambled for sinecures from Charles II and Wren learned the art of political infighting at court, finally becoming Surveyor of the Royal Works-the King's engineer. Most important, the author recounts the intriguing story of the building of St. Paul's. The Great Fire of 1666--vividly recreated in Tinniswood's narrative--left London a smoldering husk. Wren played a central role in reshaping the city, culminating with St. Paul's, his masterpiece--though he had to steer between King and cathedral authorities to get his radical, domed design built. As the Enlightenment dawned in England, Wren's magnificent dome rose above London, soon to become an icon of London and world architecture. One of the most influential architects in history, Christopher Wren comes vividly to life in this fittingly grand biography.

The Royal Society

Author: Adrian Tinniswood

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781786691897

Category:

Page: 256

View: 421

The Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge has been at the forefront of scientific endeavour for more than 350 years, since receiving its royal charter from Charles II in 1662. Philosophical Transactions, published in 1665, established the concepts of scientific priority and peer review and is the oldest scientific journal in continuous publication in the world. The 8,000 fellows elected to the Society to date include all of the scientific leading lights of the last four centuries, including Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin, Tim Berners-Lee and Stephen Hawking. The Society's motto, nullius in verba, 'on the word of no one', is a reminder of its founders' belief that authority must always be questioned; hypotheses can never be taken for granted; truths must be demonstrated or they are not truths at all. Adrian Tinniswood examines why the Royal Society has been such a pivotal institution in the cultural life of Britain and the world.

Pirates of Barbary

Corsairs, Conquests and Captivity in the Seventeenth-Century Mediterranean

Author: Adrian Tinniswood

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101445319

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 6918

The stirring story of the seventeenth-century pirates of the Mediterranean-the forerunners of today's bandits of the seas-and how their conquests shaped the clash between Christianity and Islam. It's easy to think of piracy as a romantic way of life long gone-if not for today's frightening headlines of robbery and kidnapping on the high seas. Pirates have existed since the invention of commerce itself, but they reached the zenith of their power during the 1600s, when the Mediterranean was the crossroads of the world and pirates were the scourge of Europe and the glory of Islam. They attacked ships, enslaved crews, plundered cargoes, enraged governments, and swayed empires, wreaking havoc from Gibraltar to the Holy Land and beyond. Historian and author Adrian Tinniswood brings alive this dynamic chapter in history, where clashes between pirates of the East-Tunis, Algiers, and Tripoli-and governments of the West-England, France, Spain, and Venice-grew increasingly intense and dangerous. In vivid detail, Tinniswood recounts the brutal struggles, glorious triumphs, and enduring personalities of the pirates of the Barbary Coast, and how their maneuverings between the Muslim empires and Christian Europe shed light on the religious and moral battles that still rage today. As Tinniswood notes in Pirates of Barbary, "Pirates are history." In this fascinating and entertaining book, he reveals that the history of piracy is also the history that shaped our modern world.

Requisitioned

The British Country House in the Second World War

Author: John Martin Robinson

Publisher: Aurum Press Limited

ISBN: 9781781310953

Category: Architecture

Page: 192

View: 8171

This book profiles 20 country houses and their fate during WW2, from schools (Chatsworth) to hospitals to barracks (Eaton Hall) to storing the National Art Collection (Penrhyn Castle). Wide geographical spread, including Scotland (where the SOE trained in West Coast castles like Rosneath) and Wales. Some houses have since been restored to former glory, like Arundel, some are famous only as a result of their wartime role - Bletchley Park - and others have been destroyed for ever.