The Lights of Washington Park

Author: Ken Lombardo

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781366884824

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 7742

The Washington Park historic community of North Plainfield, New Jersey, has some of the most distinctive stained glass windows in its vintage homes and churches. This 240+ page book chronicles the popularity of colored glass windows, called "lights" in vintage blueprints, and studies the appearance and influence of the Tiffany Studios, among others, in this neighborhood's residences, churches, and surrounding community.

Under the Lights and In the Dark

Untold Stories of Women’s Soccer

Author: Gwendolyn Oxenham

Publisher: Icon Books

ISBN: 1785781545

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 173

View: 2541

Under the Lights and in the Dark: Untold Stories of Women's Soccer takes an unprecedented look inside the lives of professional football players around the world – from precarious positions in underfunded teams and leagues, to sold-out stadiums and bright lights. Award-winning filmmaker and journalist Gwendolyn Oxenham tells the stories of the phenoms, underdogs, and nobodies – players willing to follow the game wherever it takes them. Under the Lights and in the Dark takes us inside the world of women’s soccer, following players across the globe, from Portland Thorns star Allie Long, who trains in an underground men’s league in New York City; to English national Fara Williams, who hid her homelessness from her teammates while playing for the English national team. Oxenham takes us to Voronezh, Russia, where players battle more than just snowy pitches in pursuing their dream of playing pro, and to a refugee camp in Denmark, where Nadia Nadim, now a Danish international star, honed her skills after her family fled from the Taliban. Whether you’re a newcomer to the sport or a die-hard fan, this is an inspiring book about stars’ beginnings and adventures, struggles and hardship, and, above all, the time-honored romance of the game.

North Plainfield

Author: Mario Caruso,Bruce Ryno,Joann Kohler

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738500058

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 2450

Nestled in the northeast corner of Somerset County lies the small, 2.9-square-mile borough of North Plainfield. It is bordered on the northwest by the first ridge of the Watchung Mountains and, to the south and east, the Green Brook provides a natural boundary between Union and Somerset Counties. Rock Avenue, on the west, divides North Plainfield and Green Brook. This borough, named for its proximity to the city of Plainfield, was primarily a farming community. Its growth was stimulated by the mills and quarries built along the streams that flowed through the area and by the construction of the Jersey Central Railroad in the 1850s. North Plainfield grew from 75 residents in 1832 to 4,000 by 1885. Today, approximately 19,000 people reside in this peaceful and picturesque community.

Report

Author: Chicago (Ill.). South Park Commissioners

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Chicago

Page: N.A

View: 3636


Olympic National Park

A Natural History

Author: Tim McNulty

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295743271

Category: Science

Page: 352

View: 7548

Renowned for its old-growth rain forest, wilderness coast, and glaciated peaks, Olympic National Park is a living laboratory for ecological renewal, especially as the historic Elwha River basin regenerates in the wake of dam removal. In this classic guide to the park, Tim McNulty invites us into the natural and human history of these nearly million acres, from remote headwaters to roadside waterfalls, from shipwreck sites to Native American historical settlements and contemporary resource stewardship, along the way detailing the park�s unique plant and animal life. McNulty reminds us that though �the mountains and rivers remain �timeless,� our understanding of the lifeforms that inhabit them�and the effects our actions have on their future�is an ongoing, ever deepening story.� � Color photographs� Practical advice on how to make the most of your visit� Handy flora and fauna species checklists� Inspiring descriptions of endangered species recovery� Detailed look at Elwha River restoration after dam removal

The Siege of Washington

The Untold Story of the Twelve Days That Shook the Union

Author: John Lockwood,Charles Lockwood

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199830738

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 9763

On April 14, 1861, following the surrender of Fort Sumter, Washington was "put into the condition of a siege," declared Abraham Lincoln. Located sixty miles south of the Mason-Dixon Line, the nation's capital was surrounded by the slave states of Maryland and Virginia. With no fortifications and only a handful of trained soldiers, Washington was an ideal target for the Confederacy. The South echoed with cries of "On to Washington!" and Jefferson Davis's wife sent out cards inviting her friends to a reception at the White House on May 1. Lincoln issued an emergency proclamation on April 15, calling for 75,000 troops to suppress the rebellion and protect the capital. One question now transfixed the nation: whose forces would reach Washington first-Northern defenders or Southern attackers? For 12 days, the city's fate hung in the balance. Washington was entirely isolated from the North-without trains, telegraph, or mail. Sandbags were stacked around major landmarks, and the unfinished Capitol was transformed into a barracks, with volunteer troops camping out in the House and Senate chambers. Meanwhile, Maryland secessionists blocked the passage of Union reinforcements trying to reach Washington, and a rumored force of 20,000 Confederate soldiers lay in wait just across the Potomac River. Drawing on firsthand accounts, The Siege of Washington tells this story from the perspective of leading officials, residents trapped inside the city, Confederates plotting to seize it, and Union troops racing to save it, capturing with brilliance and immediacy the precarious first days of the Civil War.

Building Ships, Building a Nation

Korea's Democratic Unionism Under Park Chung Hee

Author: Hwasook B. Nam

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295800275

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 9353

Building Ships, Building a Nation examines the rise and fall, during the rule of Park Chung Hee (1961-79), of the combative labor union at the Korea Shipbuilding and Engineering Corporation (KSEC), which was Korea's largest shipyard until Hyundai appeared on the scene in the early 1970s. Drawing on the union's extraordinary and extensive archive, Hwasook Nam focuses on the perceptions, attitudes, and discourses of the mostly male heavy-industry workers at the shipyard and on the historical and sociopolitical sources of their militancy. Inspired by legacies of labor activism from the colonial and immediate postcolonial periods, KSEC union workers fought for equality, dignity, and a voice for labor as they struggled to secure a living wage that would support families. The standard view of the South Korean labor movement sees little connection between the immediate postwar era and the period since the 1970s and largely denies positive legacies coming from the period of Japanese colonialism in Korea. Contrary to this conventional view, Nam charts the importance of these historical legacies and argues that the massive mobilization of workers in the postwar years, even though it ended in defeat, had a major impact on the labor movement in the following decades.

Body Slam

Author: Rex Burns

Publisher: Overamstel Uitgevers

ISBN: 9049981259

Category: Fiction

Page: N.A

View: 3038

Targeted by thugs, a wrestling impresario reaches out to an old friend When Otto Lidke got a tryout in pro football, he hired a lawyer friend named Jim Raiford to handle his contract. The negotiations were bungled, forcing both men into a career change. Trying to start a pro wrestling circuit in Denver, Lidke runs afoul of the national federation, which does everything it can—legal and otherwise—to stamp out his new venture. When shady business practices escalate into threats on his life, Lidke calls on Raiford, now a private investigator, to dig up some dirt on the men who are trying to put him out of business. But instead he gets Raiford’s daughter, Julie—a whip-smart sleuth looking to prove she’s every bit as savvy as her father. As Julie and her dad dig into the vicious world of small-time wrestling, they find that though the fights may be fixed, the danger is all too real.

Empires of Light

Edison, Tesla, Westinghouse, and the Race to Electrify the World

Author: Jill Jonnes

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781588360007

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 2640

In the final decades of the nineteenth century, three brilliant and visionary titans of America’s Gilded Age—Thomas Edison, Nikola Tesla, and George Westinghouse—battled bitterly as each vied to create a vast and powerful electrical empire. In Empires of Light, historian Jill Jonnes portrays this extraordinary trio and their riveting and ruthless world of cutting-edge science, invention, intrigue, money, death, and hard-eyed Wall Street millionaires. At the heart of the story are Thomas Alva Edison, the nation’s most famous and folksy inventor, creator of the incandescent light bulb and mastermind of the world’s first direct current electrical light networks; the Serbian wizard of invention Nikola Tesla, elegant, highly eccentric, a dreamer who revolutionized the generation and delivery of electricity; and the charismatic George Westinghouse, Pittsburgh inventor and tough corporate entrepreneur, an industrial idealist who in the era of gaslight imagined a world powered by cheap and plentiful electricity and worked heart and soul to create it. Edison struggled to introduce his radical new direct current (DC) technology into the hurly-burly of New York City as Tesla and Westinghouse challenged his dominance with their alternating current (AC), thus setting the stage for one of the eeriest feuds in American corporate history, the War of the Electric Currents. The battlegrounds: Wall Street, the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, Niagara Falls, and, finally, the death chamber—Jonnes takes us on the tense walk down a prison hallway and into the sunlit room where William Kemmler, convicted ax murderer, became the first man to die in the electric chair. Empires of Light is the gripping history of electricity, the “mysterious fluid,” and how the fateful collision of Edison, Tesla, and Westinghouse left the world utterly transformed. From the Hardcover edition.

Dunkirk

Author: Diane Andrasik

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1439620180

Category: Photography

Page: 128

View: 5800

On the shores of Lake Erie, the city of Dunkirk rose into a commercial fishing center, lake port, and successful industrial city. The lake provided an invaluable natural resource and allowed the coastal community to flourish. The inspired leadership of individual residents, coupled with the arrival of waves of hardworking immigrants, contributed to Dunkirk’s place in the industrial movement of the early 1800s to the mid-1900s. As it grew, the community of Dunkirk hosted steamships in its harbor in 1810, greeted the arrival of the first train to connect the Atlantic and the Great Lakes in 1851, and produced massive steam locomotives for over half a century.

In the Light of Evolution

Volume II: Biodiversity and Extinction

Author: National Academy of Sciences

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 9780309164337

Category: Science

Page: 432

View: 8840

The current extinction crisis is of human making, and any favorable resolution of that biodiversity crisis--among the most dire in the 4-billion-year history of Earth--will have to be initiated by mankind. Little time remains for the public, corporations, and governments to awaken to the magnitude of what is at stake. This book aims to assist that critical educational mission, synthesizing recent scientific information and ideas about threats to biodiversity in the past, present, and projected future. This is the second volume from the In the Light of Evolution series, based on a series of Arthur M. Sackler colloquia, and designed to promote the evolutionary sciences. Each installment explores evolutionary perspectives on a particular biological topic that is scientifically intriguing but also has special relevance to contemporary societal issues or challenges. Individually and collectively, the ILE series aims to interpret phenomena in various areas of biology through the lens of evolution, address some of the most intellectually engaging as well as pragmatically important societal issues of our times, and foster a greater appreciation of evolutionary biology as a consolidating foundation for the life sciences.

Portland

Author: Walter Fortner

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738548746

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 7043

The year was 1901, and Portland, Oregon, was celebrating its 50th birthday, having grown from a community of 821 people to become the largest city in the Pacific Northwest. A small change in postal regulations that year opened the door to the production of the picture postcard, and collecting these cards quickly became a popular hobby. Many of these cards survive today and provide a glimpse of life in days gone by. Collected here are many rare images of Portland: grand hotels and magnificent buildings, the natural beauty of the surrounding area, the great bridges, and splendid sailing ships. The world's fair honoring the centennial of the Lewis and Clark expedition and the annual Rose Festival inspired enough cards to fill their own books.

Wynken, Blynken, and Nod

Author: Eugene Field

Publisher: Schwartz & Wade

ISBN: 0307983447

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 40

View: 5583

WYNKEN, BLYNKEN AND Nod one night Sailed off in a wooden shoe– Sailed off on a river of crystal light Into a sea of dew . . . So begins Eugene Field’s lovely bedtime poem, which tells of three wee fishermen who sail up to the stars, and a boy who imagines it all before he drifts off to sleep. Field’s timeless text has lulled generations of little listeners into dreamland, and this version, complimented by Giselle Potter’s magical illustrations, is perhaps the most enchanting—and the closest to Fields’ own vision—of all.

A Literary Guide to Washington, DC

Walking in the Footsteps of American Writers from Francis Scott Key to Zora Neale Hurston

Author: Kim Roberts

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813941180

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 9737

The site of a thriving literary tradition, Washington, DC, has been the home to many of our nation’s most acclaimed writers. From the city’s founding to the beginnings of modernism, literary luminaries including Walt Whitman, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Henry Adams, Langston Hughes, and Zora Neale Hurston have lived and worked at their craft in our nation’s capital. In A Literary Guide to Washington, DC, Kim Roberts offers a guide to the city’s rich literary history. Part walking tour, part anthology, A Literary Guide to Washington, DC is organized into five sections, each corresponding to a particularly vibrant period in Washington’s literary community. Starting with the city’s earliest years, Roberts examines writers such as Hasty-Pudding poet Joel Barlow and "Star-Spangled Banner" lyricist Francis Scott Key before moving on to the Civil War and Reconstruction and touching on the lives of authors such as Charlotte Forten Grimké and James Weldon Johnson. She wraps up her tour with World War I and the Jazz Age, which brought to the city some writers at the forefront of modernism, including the first American to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, Sinclair Lewis. The book’s stimulating tours cover downtown, the LeDroit Park and Shaw neighborhoods, Lafayette Square, and the historic U Street district, bringing the history of the city to life in surprising ways. Written for tourists, literary enthusiasts, amateur historians, and armchair travelers, A Literary Guide to Washington, DC offers a cultural tour of our nation's capital through a literary lens.

Historic Washington Park

Author: Suzanne Wildrey Bragg

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1439619425

Category: Photography

Page: 128

View: 6650

Washington Park and its neighborhood are steeped in history. When the Moravians settled in Salem in 1766, the hills to the south were used for hunting and, eventually, farming. In the late 1880s, when it became fashionable to build homes on elevated land, the bluffs became one of the most desirable residential areas to emerge in the early decades of Winston-Salem’s boom. The plan for its development, built around the electric streetcar line, was designed by Jacob Lott Ludlow, who was also responsible for the West End plat. The Washington Park neighborhood became home to many of the area’s wealthiest families, as well as the burgeoning middle class. Their lives, traditions, and habits helped shape the future of Winston-Salem. Today Washington Park is known for its grand mansions, nestled among the many bungalows, with superb views of downtown high-rises. The park, with its rolling hills and beautiful trails, provides a playground for the young and old alike. With the North Carolina School of the Arts located next door, the neighborhood is eclectic, elegant, and unique. This diversity has attracted a varied group of residents, all of whom share pride in their home, gardens, and noted creativity.