The Life of Rebecca Jones

Author: Angharad Price

Publisher: MacLehose Press

ISBN: 162365291X

Category: Fiction

Page: 176

View: 9951

In the early years of the last century, Rebecca is born into a rural community in the Maesglasau valley in Wales; her family have been working the land for a thousand years, but the changes brought about by modernity threaten the survival of her language, and her family's way of life. Three of her siblings are afflicted with a genetic blindness, and it is they who have the opportunity to be educated elsewhere and to find work, while Rebecca and her remaining brother maintain the family farm amidst a gradual influx of new technologies, from the waterpipe to the tractor and telephone, and ultimately to television. Rebecca's reflections on the century are delivered with haunting dignity and a simple intimacy, while her evocation of the changing seasons and a life that is so in tune with its surroundings is rich and poignant. The Life of Rebecca Jones has all the makings of a classic, fixing on a vanishing period of rural history, and the novel's final, unexpected revelation remains unforgettable and utterly moving.

The Life of Rebecca Jones

Author: Angharad Price

Publisher: Quercus Books

ISBN: 174334709X

Category: Fiction

Page: 176

View: 5530

A poetic work of fiction on the one hand, an autobiography on the other, The Life of Rebecca Jones is a powerful, meditative work on one family’s passage through the twentieth century.In the early years of the last century, Rebecca is born into a rural community in the Maesglasau valley in Wales; her family have been working the land for a thousand years, but the changes brought about by modernity threaten the survival of her language, and her family’s way of life. Three of her siblings are afflicted with a genetic blindness, and it is they who have the opportunity to be educated elsewhere and to find work, while Rebecca and her remaining brother maintain the family farm amidst a gradual influx of new technologies, from the waterpipe to the tractor and telephone, and ultimately to television. Rebecca’s reflections on the century are delivered with haunting dignity and a simple intimacy, while her evocation of the changing seasons and a life that is so in tune with its surroundings is rich and poignant. The Life of Rebecca Jones has all the makings of a classic, fixing on a vanishing period of rural history, and the novel’s final, unexpected revelation remains unforgettable and utterly moving.

The Life of Rebecca Jones

Author: Angharad Price

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0857387138

Category: Fiction

Page: 176

View: 2187

In the early years of the last century, Rebecca is born into a rural community in the Maesglasau valley in Wales; her family have been working the land for a thousand years, but the changes brought about by modernity threaten the survival of her language, and her family's way of life. Rebecca's reflections on the century are delivered with haunting dignity and a simple intimacy, while her evocation of the changing seasons and a life that is so in tune with its surroundings is rich and poignant. The Life of Rebecca Jones has all the makings of a classic, fixing on a vanishing period of rural history, and the novels final, unexpected revelation remains unforgettable and utterly moving.

Broken for Good

How Grief Awoke My Greatest Hopes

Author: Rebecca Rene Jones

Publisher: FaithWords

ISBN: 1455538051

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 749

A daughter's narrative about life with and without her father, whose death plunges her into deep grief but gradually becomes her most compelling reason to hope. Like so many Christian women, Rebecca, her mother, and her two sisters love a man who does not walk beside them in faith. As his cancer returns after a year of remission, they face his last days. As the women in his life struggle to savor their final times together and let go, he finally reaches out to God, and tells them so. Her father's death opens the landscape of heaven and hope to her. She beautifully renders those visions as well as the underbelly of sorrow as she is finally forced to wake up to the world, to new hungers, and to a far more dangerous faith. Here is a spiritual coming of age manifesto that will take its place alongside Voskamp and Lamott as uplifting writing on loss, grief, and growing up, quick.

Matthew and Tilly

Author: Rebecca C. Jones,Beth Peck

Publisher: Puffin

ISBN: 9780140556407

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 32

View: 8205

Like all good friends, Matthew and Tilly have an occasional tiff, but their friendship prevails despite their differences.

Baby Love

Choosing Motherhood After a Lifetime of Ambivalence

Author: Rebecca Walker

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1440662835

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 500

From the international bestselling author of Black, White, and Jewish comes a "wonderfully insightful" (Associated Press) book that's destined to become a motherhood classic. Now in trade. Like many women her age, thirty-four-year-old Rebecca Walker was brought up to be skeptical of motherhood. As an adult she longed for a baby but feared losing her independence. In this very smart memoir, Walker explores some of the larger sociological trends of her generation while delivering her own story about the emotional and intellectual transformation that led her to motherhood.

Green Harvest

A History of Organic Farming and Gardening in Australia

Author: Rebecca Jones

Publisher: CSIRO PUBLISHING

ISBN: 0643102108

Category: Science

Page: 208

View: 5946

Green Harvest explores the ideas and practices that have shaped organic farming and gardening in Australia from the interwar years to the present day. It reveals that Australian organic farming and gardening societies were amongst the first in the world, being active as early as the 1940s. In what way does human health depend upon the natural environment? Green Harvest traces this idea through four themes of Australian organic farming and gardening – soil, chemical free, ecological well-being and back to the land – each illustrated with a case study profiling an Australian organic farmer or gardener. Personalities in Australian organic gardening, such as Jackie French and Peter Bennett, talk about organic growing. The book also features extracts from early organic magazines and interviews with current organic growers, including banana and macadamia farmers, managers of outback sheep stations, dairy farmers and self-sufficiency gardeners. All of these tell the story of Australian organic farming and gardening: past, present and future.

In the Days of Rain

A Daughter, a Father, a Cult

Author: Rebecca Stott

Publisher: Spiegel & Grau

ISBN: 0812989090

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 8384

A father-daughter story that tells of the author’s experience growing up in a separatist fundamentalist Christian cult, from the author of the national bestseller Ghostwalk Rebecca Stott grew up in in Brighton, England, as a fourth-generation member of the Exclusive Brethren, a cult that believed the world is ruled by Satan. In this closed community, books that didn’t conform to the sect’s rules were banned, women were subservient to men and were made to dress modestly and cover their heads, and those who disobeyed the rules were punished and shamed. Yet Rebecca’s father, Roger Stott, a high-ranking Brethren minister, was a man of contradictions: he preached that the Brethren should shun the outside world, yet he kept a radio in the trunk of his car and hid copies of Yeats and Shakespeare behind the Brethren ministries. Years later, when the Stotts broke with the Brethren after a scandal involving the cult’s leader, Roger became an actor, filmmaker, and compulsive gambler who left the family penniless and ended up in jail. A curious child, Rebecca spent her insular childhood asking questions about the world and trying to glean the answers from forbidden library books. Only when she was an adult and her father was dying of cancer did she begin to understand all that had occurred during those harrowing years. It was then that Roger Stott handed her the memoir he had begun writing about the period leading up to what he referred to as the traumatic “Nazi decade,” the years in the 1960s in which he and other Brethren leaders enforced coercive codes of behavior that led to the breaking apart of families, the shunning of members, even suicides. Now he was trying to examine that time, and his complicity in it, and he asked Rebecca to write about it, to expose all that was kept hidden. In the Days of Rain is Rebecca Stott’s attempt to make sense of her childhood in the Exclusive Brethren, to understand her father’s role in the cult and in the breaking apart of her family, and to come to be at peace with her relationship with a larger-than-life figure whose faults were matched by a passion for life, a thirst for knowledge, and a love of literature and beauty. A father-daughter story as well as a memoir of growing up in a closed-off community and then finding a way out of it, this is an inspiring and beautiful account of the bonds of family and the power of self-invention. Praise for In the Days of Rain “A marvelous, strange, terrifying book, somehow finding words both for the intensity of a childhood locked in a tyrannical secret world, and for the lifelong aftershocks of being liberated from it.”—Francis Spufford, author of Golden Hill “Writers are forged in strange fires, but none stranger than Rebecca Stott’s. By rights, her memoir of her father and her early childhood inside a closed fundamentalist sect obsessed by the Rapture ought to be a horror story. But while the historian in her is merciless in exposing the cruelties and corruption involved, Rebecca the child also lights up the book, existing in a world of vivid play, dreams, even nightmares, so passionate and imaginative that it helps explain how she survived, and—even more miraculous—found the compassion and understanding to do justice to the story of her father and the painful family life he created.”—Sarah Dunant, author of The Birth of Venus

O! Tyn Y Gorchudd

The Life of Rebecca Jones

Author: Angharad Price,Lloyd Jones

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781848511750

Category: Biographical fiction

Page: 202

View: 444

Fersiwn dwyieithog o'r clasur Cymraeg, O! Tyn y Gorchudd a enillodd y Fedal Ryddiaith yn yr Eisteddfod Genedlaethol yn 2002. Hunangofiant dychmygol hen fodryb yr awdures a fu farw yn ei phlentyndod, yn cynnwys portread byw a chynnes o gymdeithas wledig Gymraeg yn Sir Feirionnydd yn ystod yr 20fed ganrif. -- Cyngor Llyfrau Cymru

The Life to Come

A Novel

Author: Michelle de Kretser

Publisher: Catapult

ISBN: 1936787830

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 687

Winner of the 2018 Miles Franklin Literary Award Shortlisted for the 2018 Stella Prize “For a novel concerned with dislocation, there's a lot of grounding humor in The Life to Come. Most of it comes at the expense of Pippa and her ilk, but de Kretser's observations are so spot on, you'll forgive her even as you cringe.” —New York Times Book Review “The acclaimed Australian writer’s fifth novel spans continents—set in Australia, France and her native Sri Lanka—and weaves together disparate narratives that raise uncomfortable questions about Australian society, self-satisfied liberalism and modern life.” —Huffington Post, "60 Books We Can't Wait to Read in 2018” Set in Australia, France, and Sri Lanka, Miles Franklin Award-shortlisted The Life to Come is about the stories we tell and don’t tell ourselves as individuals, as societies, and as nations. Driven by a vivid cast of characters, it explores necessary emigration, the art of fiction, and ethnic and class conflict. Pippa is an Australian writer who longs for the success of her novelist teacher and eventually comes to fear that she “missed everything important.” In Paris, Celeste tries to convince herself that her feelings for her married lover are reciprocated. Ash makes strategic use of his childhood in Sri Lanka, but blots out the memory of a tragedy from that time and can’t commit to his trusting girlfriend, Cassie. Sri Lankan Christabel, who is generously offered a passage to Sydney by Bunty, an old acquaintance, endures her dull job and envisions a brighter future that “rose, glittered, and sank back,” while she neglects the love close at hand. The stand-alone yet connected worlds of The Life to Come offer meditations on intimacy, loneliness, and our flawed perception of reality. Enormously moving, gorgeously observant of physical detail, and often very funny, this new novel by Michelle de Kretser reveals how the shadows cast by both the past and the future can transform and distort the present. It is teeming with life and earned wisdom—exhilaratingly contemporary, with the feel of a classic.

My Life in Middlemarch

Author: Rebecca Mead

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 0307984788

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 7942

A New Yorker writer revisits the seminal book of her youth--Middlemarch--and fashions a singular, involving story of how a passionate attachment to a great work of literature can shape our lives and help us to read our own histories. Rebecca Mead was a young woman in an English coastal town when she first read George Eliot's Middlemarch, regarded by many as the greatest English novel. After gaining admission to Oxford, and moving to the United States to become a journalist, through several love affairs, then marriage and family, Mead read and reread Middlemarch. The novel, which Virginia Woolf famously described as "one of the few English novels written for grown-up people," offered Mead something that modern life and literature did not. In this wise and revealing work of biography, reporting, and memoir, Rebecca Mead leads us into the life that the book made for her, as well as the many lives the novel has led since it was written. Employing a structure that deftly mirrors that of the novel, My Life in Middlemarch takes the themes of Eliot's masterpiece--the complexity of love, the meaning of marriage, the foundations of morality, and the drama of aspiration and failure--and brings them into our world. Offering both a fascinating reading of Eliot's biography and an exploration of the way aspects of Mead's life uncannily echo that of Eliot herself, My Life in Middlemarch is for every ardent lover of literature who cares about why we read books, and how they read us. From the Hardcover edition.

The Futurist

The Life and Films of James Cameron

Author: Rebecca Keegan

Publisher: Three Rivers Press (CA)

ISBN: 0307460320

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 283

View: 9690

An in-depth look at every aspect of Cameron's creative genius, providing a revealing portrait of the director's life and work.

Fanny Crosby

Queen of Gospel Songs

Author: Rebecca Davis

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780692207390

Category:

Page: 126

View: 2766

The man said he was a doctor . . . but he did something to little baby Fanny's eyes that made her blind for the rest of her life. How could she find out about the world around her? How could she be happy? How could she learn? How could she love God? How could she forgive? Fanny Crosby was blind for more than ninety years . . . and she wrote over 8,000 hymns and gospel songs about her Savior. Potter's Wheel Books: showing children the Master Potter at work Christian biography for children ages 7-10

No Great Mischief

Author: Alistair MacLeod

Publisher: Emblem Editions

ISBN: 1551995476

Category: Fiction

Page: 304

View: 7887

Alexander MacDonald guides us through his family’s mythic past as he recollects the heroic stories of his people: loggers, miners, drinkers, adventurers; men forever in exile, forever linked to their clan. There is the legendary patriarch who left the Scottish Highlands in 1779 and resettled in “the land of trees,” where his descendents became a separate Nova Scotia clan. There is the team of brothers and cousins, expert miners in demand around the world for their dangerous skills. And there is Alexander and his twin sister, who have left Cape Breton and prospered, yet are haunted by the past. Elegiac, hypnotic, by turns joyful and sad, No Great Mischief is a spellbinding story of family, loyalty, exile, and of the blood ties that bind us, generations later, to the land from which our ancestors came.

Confessions of a Shopaholic

A Novel

Author: Sophie Kinsella

Publisher: Delta

ISBN: 9780440334453

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 1649

BONUS: This edition contains an excerpt from Sophie Kinsella’s Shopaholic to the Stars. Becky Bloomwood has a fabulous flat in London’s trendiest neighborhood, a troupe of glamorous socialite friends, and a closet brimming with the season’s must-haves. The only trouble is, she can’t actually afford it—not any of it. Her job writing at Successful Saving magazine not only bores her to tears, it doesn’t pay much at all. And lately Becky’s been chased by dismal letters from the bank—letters with large red sums she can’t bear to read. She tries cutting back. But none of her efforts succeeds. Her only consolation is to buy herself something . . . just a little something. Finally a story arises that Becky actually cares about, and her front-page article catalyzes a chain of events that will transform her life—and the lives of those around her—forever. Praise for Sophie Kinsella and Confessions of a Shopaholic “A hilarious tale . . . hijinks worthy of classic I Love Lucy episodes . . . too good to pass up.”—USA Today “Kinsella’s Bloomwood is plucky and funny. . . . You won’t have to shop around to find a more winning protagonist.”—People “If a crème brûlée could be transmogrified into a book, it would be Confessions of a Shopaholic.”—The Star-Ledger “A have-your-cake-and-eat-it romp, done with brio and not a syllable of moralizing. . . . Kinsella has a light touch and puckish humor.”—Kirkus Reviews

Mr Cassini

Author: Lloyd Jones

Publisher: Seren

ISBN: 1781723656

Category: Fiction

Page: 318

View: 9997

WINNER OF WALES BOOK OF THE YEAR AWARD 2007 “Lloyd Jones's psychogeographic epic about, among other things, Wales, football, water-divining, madness, vampires, Merlin, legends, policemen, birds, mannequins and picnics, is full of ideas but (purposefully) spirals far away from any kind of narrative. Absurdist and resonant, this is a meditation on a nation that is anything but straightforward.” THE GUARDIAN “Few people write with this much verve any more. An extraordinary work of the imagination.” THE INDEPENDENT “Lyrical and inventive.” THE TIMES Mr Cassini, the remarkable follow-up to the award-winning Mr Vogel, is an amazing journey through the geography of one man’s troubled mind as he tries to recover the lost years of his childhood. Duxie is a dreamer with holes in his memory. With the help of a mysterious and beautiful girl he sets out on a quest to fill the gaps in his history. And as they search the landscapes and myths of the past they uncover domestic and national tyranny. The tale twists together strands of dream, daydream and reality as Duxie journeys towards freedom – and a final understanding of what caused his amnesia. Because lurking deep within his dreams is a sinister, vampire figure called Mr Cassini, who drinks women’s tears, keeps stolen mannequins in a darkened room, and gets up to terrible deeds with his policeman side-kick. Journeying through time, Duxie investigates caves and wells, mystics and madness, and seeks out four extraordinary champions to help him stage a showcase trial on a mountain in the centre of Wales. Mr Cassini is a novel with many themes, including monsters, snow, picnics, islands, drugs, rainbows, eating disorders, insects, justice and magic. Lloyd Jones walked around Wales – a journey of more than a thousand miles – while writing his first novel, the prize-winning Mr Vogel. For Mr Cassini he changed tack, walking across Wales seven times in seven different directions. The result is an ambitious and brilliant exploration of lost childhood and the distortions of the past. Learned, funny and tragic, Mr Cassini is told in dazzling colour.

Red Hot Mama

The Life of Sophie Tucker

Author: Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 1477312366

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 300

View: 7447

The “First Lady of Show Business” and the “Last of the Red Hot Mamas,” Sophie Tucker was a star in vaudeville, radio, film, and television. A gutsy, song-belting stage performer, she entertained audiences for sixty years and inspired a host of younger women, including Judy Garland, Carol Channing, and Bette Midler. Tucker was a woman who defied traditional expectations and achieved success on her own terms, becoming the first female president of the American Federation of Actors and winning many other honors usually bestowed on men. Dedicated to social justice, she advocated for African Americans in the entertainment industry and cultivated friendships with leading black activists and performers. Tucker was also one of the most generous philanthropists in show business, raising over four million dollars for the religious and racial causes she held dear. Drawing from the hundreds of scrapbooks Tucker compiled, Red Hot Mama presents a compelling biography of this larger-than-life performer. Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff tells an engrossing story of how a daughter of Russian Jewish immigrants set her sights on becoming one of the most formidable women in show business and achieved her version of the American dream. More than most of her contemporaries, Tucker understood how to keep her act fresh, to change branding when audiences grew tired and, most importantly, how to connect with her fans, the press, and entertainment moguls. Both deservedly famous and unjustly forgotten today, Tucker stands out as an exemplar of the immigrant experience and a trailblazer for women in the entertainment industry.

Living Between the Dash

Author: Rebecca G. Jones

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781519293817

Category:

Page: 112

View: 422

Gabrielle and Michael met in college and married young. With him being a residency doctor his work took him away from home and from his wife a lot. Both were raised in a Christian home. But could their love survive? Could they keep those marriage vows? Would Gabrielle stray away from those marriage vows with her coworker or her ex-boyfriend who reappeared into her life? Just how strong is love and commitment to God and each other? Life begins with your birth date and then sometime in the future ends with your death date. Living Between the Dash is a story of life with all its love, sadness and hopes and how we live our lives between the dash.

Slow Catastrophes

Living with Drought in Australia

Author: Rebecca Jones

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781925495430

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 4486

Dead sheep, dry dams, cracked earth and economic devastation: we feel we understand drought and yet there is more to this story. Australias long history of drought has goaded people to adapt and respond creatively. This book explores the way people have lived and worked with drought from the nineteenth century until today. This history is revealed through the personal, intimate stories of eight farming families living between the 1870s and 1950s. Each of these households is brought to life, through personal diaries, in the daily rituals of life on the land in different times and places, in accounts of families, communities, weather and political events. More than a history of farming, this is a picture of humanity, resilience, emotions and creative ways of adapting to a changing climate which reveal stories of national and global importance. Living with drought is one of the biggest issues of our times. Climate change scenarios suggest that in the next fifty years global warming will increase the frequency and severity of drought; the book suggests new and surprising ways in which people have adapted to climate extremes. This is a lively, colourful and accessible history which will inform and entertain. It is neither triumphal nor didactic, but tells of people learning about the land, to cope and adapt to a variable climate which is a constant presence in their everyday lives.

Levels of the Game

Author: John McPhee

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 0374708657

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 160

View: 2299

This account of a tennis match played by Arthur Ashe against Clark Graebner at Forest Hills in 1968 begins with the ball rising into the air for the initial serve and ends with the final point. McPhee provides a brilliant, stroke-by-stroke description while examining the backgrounds and attitudes which have molded the players' games.