The Lemon Tree

An Arab, a Jew, and the Heart of the Middle East

Author: Sandy Tolan

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781596919228

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 2165

With a new afterword by the author, and a sneak preview of Sandy Tolan's new book, Children of the Stone In 1967, Bashir Al-Khayri, a Palestinian twenty-five-year-old, journeyed to Israel, with the goal of seeing the beloved old stone house, with the lemon tree behind it, that he and his family had fled nineteen years earlier. To his surprise, when he found the house he was greeted by Dalia Ashkenazi Landau, a nineteen-year-old Israeli college student, whose family fled Europe for Israel following the Holocaust. On the stoop of their shared home, Dalia and Bashir began a rare friendship, forged in the aftermath of war and tested over the next thirty-five years in ways that neither could imagine on that summer day in 1967. Based on extensive research, and springing from his enormously resonant documentary that aired on NPR's Fresh Air in 1998, Sandy Tolan brings the Israeli-Palestinian conflict down to its most human level, suggesting that even amid the bleakest political realities there exist stories of hope and reconciliation.

Children of the Stone

The Power of Music in a Hard Land

Author: Sandy Tolan

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1408853051

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 3345

Children of the Stone is the unlikely story of Ramzi Hussein Aburedwan, a boy from a Palestinian refugee camp in Ramallah who confronts the occupying army, gets an education, masters an instrument, dreams of something much bigger than himself, and then inspires scores of others to work with him to make that dream a reality. That dream is of a music school in the midst of a refugee camp in Ramallah, a school that will transform the lives of thousands of children through music. Daniel Barenboim, the Israeli musician and music director of La Scala in Milan and the Berlin Opera, is among those who help Ramzi realize his dream. He has played with Ramzi frequently, at chamber music concerts in Al-Kamandjati, the school Ramzi worked so hard to build, and in the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra that Barenboim founded with the late Palestinian intellectual, Edward Said. Children of the Stone is a story about music, freedom and conflict; determination and vision. It's a vivid portrait of life amid checkpoints and military occupation, a growing movement of nonviolent resistance, the past and future of musical collaboration across the Israeli-Palestinian divide, and the potential of music to help children see new possibilities for their lives. Above all, Children of the Stone chronicles the journey of Ramzi Aburedwan, and how he worked against the odds to create something lasting and beautiful in a war-torn land.

We Belong to the Land

The Story of a Palestinian Israeli Who Lives for Peace and Reconciliation

Author: Elias Chacour,Mary E. Jensen

Publisher: University of Notre Dame Pess

ISBN: 0268077096

Category: Religion

Page: 232

View: 8848

Nominated several times for the Noble Peace Prize, world-renowned Palestinian priest, Elias Chacour, narrates the gripping story of his life spent working to achieve peace and reconciliation among Israeli Jews, Christians, and Muslims. From the destruction of his boyhood village and his work as a priest in Galilee to his efforts to build school, libraries, and summer camps for children of all religions, this peacemaker’s moving story brings hope to one of the most complex struggles of our time.

Jerusalem 1913

The Origins of the Arab-Israeli Conflict

Author: Amy Dockser Marcus

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1440632707

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 5242

A Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter examines the true history of the discord between Israel and Palestine with surprising results Though the origins of the Arab-Israeli conflict have traditionally been traced to the British Mandate (1920-1948) that ended with the creation of the Israeli state, a new generation of scholars has taken the investigation further back, to the Ottoman period. The first popular account of this key era, Jerusalem 1913 shows us a cosmopolitan city whose religious tolerance crumbled before the onset of Z ionism and its corresponding nationalism on both sides-a conflict that could have been resolved were it not for the onset of World War I. With extraordinary skill, Amy Dockser Marcus rewrites the story of one of the world's most indelible divides.

The Lemon Tree

An Arab, a Jew, and the Heart of the Middle East

Author: Sandy Tolan

Publisher: Singapore Books

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 264

View: 6265

In the summer of 1967, not long after the Six Day War, three young Arab men ventured into the town of Ramla, in what is now Jewish Israel. They were cousins, on a pilgrimage to see their childhood homes; their families had been driven out of Palestine nearly twebty years earlier.

My Promised Land

the triumph and tragedy of Israel

Author: Ari Shavit

Publisher: Scribe Publications

ISBN: 1922070599

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 587

An authoritative and deeply personal narrative history of the State of Israel, by one of the most influential journalists writing about the Middle East today Not since Thomas Friedman’s groundbreaking From Beirut to Jerusalem has a book captured the Middle East as keenly and dynamically as My Promised Land. In this riveting narrative, Ari Shavit draws on interviews, historical documents, private diaries, and letters, as well as his own family’s story, to illuminate the pivotal moments of the Zionist century. In doing so, he also sheds new light on the problems and threats that Israel is currently facing. Beginning with his great-grandfather — a British Zionist who in 1897 visited the Holy Land on a Thomas Cook tour and understood that it was the way of the future for his people — Shavit recounts and analyses the diverse experiences of Israeli people, past and present: the idealist young farmer who first grew the Jaffa oranges that would create Palestine’s booming economy; the immigrant orphans of Europe’s Holocaust, who took on menial work and focused on raising their children to become the leaders of the new state; the zealous religious Zionists who started the settler movement in the 1970s; and today’s architects of Israel’s foreign policy with Iran, whose nuclear threat looms over the tiny country. As it examines the complexities and contradictions of the Israeli condition, My Promised Land asks difficult but important questions: Why did Israel come to be? How did it come to be? Can Israel survive? Provocative, heartfelt, and powerfully compelling, this is a landmark portrait of a small, vibrant country living on the edge, whose identity and presence play a crucial role in today’s global political landscape.

Embracing Israel/Palestine

A Strategy to Heal and Transform the Middle East

Author: Michael Lerner

Publisher: North Atlantic Books

ISBN: 1583943382

Category: Political Science

Page: 448

View: 9026

A major modern conundrum is how the Arab/Israel conflict remains unresolved and, seemingly, unresolvable. In this inspirational book, Rabbi Michael Lerner suggests that a change in consciousness is crucial. With clarity and honesty, he examines how the mutual demonization and discounting of each sides’ legitimate needs drive the debate, and he points to new ways of thinking that can lead to a solution. Lerner emphasizes that this new approach to the issue requires giving primacy to love, kindness, and generosity. It calls for challenging the master narratives in both Israel and Palestine as well as the false idea that “homeland security” can be achieved through military, political, economic, or media domination. Lerner makes the case that a lasting peace must prioritize helping people on all sides (including Europe and the U.S.) and that real security is best achieved through an ethos of caring and generosity toward “the other.” As many spiritual leaders have taught, problems like these cannot be solved at the same level at which they originated—one must seek higher ground, and that becomes a central task for anyone who wants a sustainable peace. Embracing Israel/Palestine is written for those looking for positive, practical solutions to this ongoing dilemma. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Me and Hank

A Boy and His Hero, Twenty-Five Years Later

Author: Sandy Tolan

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0684871319

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 4288

A white baseball fan who reconnects with his childhood hero, Hall of Famer Hank Aaron, rediscovers the magnitude of the athlete's triumph over prejudice and bigotry. Reprint. 15,000 first printing.

Side by Side

Parallel Histories of Israel-Palestine

Author: Sāmī ʻAbd al-Razzāq ʻAdwān,Peace Research Institute in the Middle East

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595586830

Category: History

Page: 398

View: 5731

This is a dual narrative of Israeli and Palestinian history, where readers can track each against the other, noting both where they differ as well as where they correspond. This format reveals surprising juxtapositions and allows readers to consider and process the very different viewpoints and logic of each side of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

A Land of Two Peoples

Martin Buber on Jews and Arabs

Author: Martin Buber

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226078021

Category: History

Page: 322

View: 7105

Theologian, philosopher, and political radical, Martin Buber (1878–1965) was actively committed to a fundamental economic and political reconstruction of society as well as the pursuit of international peace. In his voluminous writings on Arab-Jewish relations in Palestine, Buber united his religious and philosophical teachings with his politics, which he felt were essential to a life of public dialogue and service to God. Collected in ALand of Two Peoples are the private and open letters, addresses, and essays in which Buber advocated binationalism as a solution to the conflict in the Middle East. A committed Zionist, Buber steadfastly articulated the moral necessity for reconciliation and accommodation between the Arabs and Jews. From the Balfour Declaration of November 1917 to his death in 1965, he campaigned passionately for a "one state solution. With the Middle East embroiled in religious and ethnic chaos, A Land of Two Peoples remains as relevant today as it was when it was first published more than twenty years ago. This timely reprint, which includes a new preface by Paul Mendes-Flohr, offers context and depth to current affairs and will be welcomed by those interested in Middle Eastern studies and political theory.

Tasting the Sky

A Palestinian Childhood

Author: Ibtisam Barakat

Publisher: Square Fish

ISBN: 9781250097187

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 208

View: 8936

"When a war ends it does not go away," my mother says."It hides inside us . . . Just forget!" But I do not want to do what Mother says . . . I want to remember. In this groundbreaking memoir set in Ramallah during the aftermath of the 1967 Six-Day War, Ibtisam Barakat captures what it is like to be a child whose world is shattered by war. With candor and courage, she stitches together memories of her childhood: fear and confusion as bombs explode near her home and she is separated from her family; the harshness of life in the Middle East as a Palestinian refugee; her unexpected joy when she discovers Alef, the first letter of the Arabic alphabet. This is the beginning of her passionate connection to words, and as language becomes her refuge, allowing her to piece together the fragments of her world, it becomes her true home. Transcending the particulars of politics, Tasting the Sky: A Palestinian Childhood is an illuminating and timely book that provides a telling glimpse into a part of the Middle East that has become an increasingly important part of the puzzle of world peace. Winner of the Arab American National Museum Book Award for Children's/YA Literature “In vivid, beautiful prose, Ibtisam Barakat transports readers into a place few Westerners have ever seen—the interior life of a young girl and her family in the occupied West Bank. This book, appropriate for readers young and old, holds literature’s great power: the power to humanize the ‘other,’ and to therefore change the way we understand our world.” —Sandy Tolan, author of The Lemon Tree: An Arab, a Jew, and the Heart of the Middle East

I Shall Not Hate

A Gaza Doctor's Journey on the Road to Peace and Human Dignity

Author: Izzeldin Abuelaish

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1408815621

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 7077

Heart-breaking, hopeful and horrifying, I Shall Not Hate is a Palestinian doctor's inspiring account of his extraordinary life, growing up in poverty but determined to treat his patients in Gaza and Israel regardless of their ethnic origin. A London University- and Harvard-trained Palestinian doctor who was born and raised in the Jabalia refugee camp in the Gaza Strip and 'who has devoted his life to medicine and reconciliation between Israelis and Palestinians' (New York Times), Abuelaish is an infertility specialist who lives in Gaza but works in Israel. On the strip of land he calls home (where 1.5 million Gazan refugees are crammed into a few square miles) the Gaza doctor has been crossing the lines in the sand that divide Israelis and Palestinians for most of his life - as a physician who treats patients on both sides of the line, as a humanitarian who sees the need for improved health and education for women as the way forward in the Middle East. And, most recently, as the father whose three daughters were killed by Israeli shells on 16 January 2009, during Israel's incursion into the Gaza Strip. It was his response to this tragedy that made news and won him humanitarian awards around the world. Instead of seeking revenge or sinking into hatred, Izzeldin Abuelaish called for the people in the region to start talking to each other. His deepest hope is that his daughters will be 'the last sacrifice on the road to peace between Palestinians and Israelis'.

Married to a Bedouin

Author: Marguerite Van Geldermalsen

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781407454450

Category: Bedouins

Page: 422

View: 9737

New Zealand born nurse Marguerite van Geldermalsen first visited the lost city Petra with her friend Elizabeth in 1978 on a sightseeing tour of the ancient world. Already looking forward to her beach holiday at the end of the trip, little did Maguerite know she was about to meet the man she would marry, the charismatic Mohammad Abdallah Othman, a Bedouin craftsman of the Manajah tribe. A life with Mohammad meant moving into his ancient cave and learning to love the regular tasks of baking shrak bread on an open fire and collecting water from the spring. But as Marguerite feels herself becoming part of the Bedouin community, she is thankful for the twist in fate that has led her to this contented life. Marguerite's light-hearted and guileless observations of the people she comes to love are as heart-warming as they are valuable, charting Bedouin traditions now lost to the modern world.

Mornings in Jenin

Author: Susan Abulhawa

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing UK

ISBN: 9781408809488

Category: Arab-Israeli conflict

Page: 352

View: 5577

In the tradition of Khaled Hosseini, powerful storytelling that brings to life the lives of Palestinians in an epic novel that will move you to tears.

City of Oranges

Author: Adam LeBor

Publisher: Head of Zeus Ltd

ISBN: 1786695928

Category: Political Science

Page: 464

View: 315

The old port of Jaffa, now part of Tel Aviv, was once known as the 'Bride of Palestine', one of the truly cosmopolitan cities of the Mediterranean. There Muslims, Jews, and Christians lived, worked, and celebrated together and it was commonplace for the Arabs of Jaffa to attend a wedding at the house of the Jewish Chelouche family or for Jews and Arabs to gather at the Jewish spice shop Tiv and the Arab Khamis Abulafia's twenty-four-hour bakery. Through intimate personal interviews and memoirs, letters, and diaries, Adam LeBor gives us a crucial look at the human lives behind the headlines and a vivid narrative of cataclysmic change.

The Almond Tree

Author: Michelle Cohen Corasanti

Publisher: Garnet Publishing Ltd

ISBN: 1859643302

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 2207

Gifted with a mind that continues to impress the elders in his village, Ichmad Hamid struggles with the knowledge that he can do nothing to save his friends and family. Living on Occupied land, his entire village operates in constant fear of losing their homes, jobs and belongings. But more importantly, they fear losing each other. On Ichmad''s twelfth birthday, that fear becomes reality. With his father imprisoned, his family''s home and possessions confiscated, and his siblings quickly succumbing to hatred in the face of conflict. Ichmad begins an inspiring journey using his intellect to save his poor and dying family. In doing so he reclaims a love for others that was lost through a childhood rife with violence, and discovers a new hope for the future.

Once Upon a Country

A Palestinian Life

Author: Sari Nusseibeh

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1250098750

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 560

View: 3534

A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice A teacher, a scholar, a philosopher, and an eyewitness to history, Sari Nusseibeh is one of our most urgent and articulate authorities on the conflict in the Middle East. From his time teaching side by side with Israelis at the Hebrew University through his appointment by Yasir Arafat to administer the Arab Jerusalem, he has held fast to the principles of freedom and equality for all, and his story dramatizes the consequences of war, partition, and terrorism as few other books have done. This autobiography brings rare depth and compassion to the story of his country.