The King and the Slave

Author: Tim Leach

Publisher: Atlantic Books Ltd

ISBN: 0857899244

Category: Fiction

Page: 300

View: 6603

Ten years after the fall of Babylon, Cyrus's army is on the march again. His slave Croesus, no longer a young man, accompanies him as always, as does the king's son and heir Cambyses, who has inherited none of his father's diplomacy or charisma and all of his vanity and violence. When the warriors of Persia are unexpectedly crushed in battle Cyrus is put to death, and Cambyses assumes the throne. Croesus, once a king himself, is called upon to guide the young man; but the young man cannot be guided, and after taking offence at an insult by an Egyptian ruler, Cambyses takes the full force of his father's empire to Africa for bloody and brutal vengeance...

The Pinkster King and the King of Kongo

The Forgotten History of America's Dutch-Owned Slaves

Author: Jeroen Dewulf

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1496808843

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 7751

The Pinkster King and the King of Kongo presents the history of the nation’s forgotten Dutch slave community and free Dutch-speaking African Americans from seventeenth-century New Amsterdam to nineteenth-century New York and New Jersey. It also develops a provocative new interpretation of one of America’s most intriguing black folkloric traditions, Pinkster. Jeroen Dewulf rejects the usual interpretation of this celebration of a “slave king” as a form of carnival. Instead, he shows that it is a ritual rooted in mutual-aid and slave brotherhood traditions. By placing these traditions in an Atlantic context, Dewulf identifies striking parallels to royal election rituals in slave communities elsewhere in the Americas, and he traces these rituals to the ancient Kingdom of Kongo and the impact of Portuguese culture in West-Central Africa. Dewulf’s focus on the social capital of slaves follows the mutual aid to seventeenth-century Manhattan. He suggests a much stronger impact of Manhattan’s first slave community on the development of African American identity in New York and New Jersey than hitherto assumed. While the earliest works on slave culture in a North American context concentrated on an assumed process of assimilation according to European standards, later studies pointed out the need to look for indigenous African continuities. The Pinkster King and the King of Kongo suggests the necessity for an increased focus on the substantial contact that many Africans had with European—primarily Portuguese—cultures before they were shipped as slaves to the Americas. The book has already garnered honors as the winner of the Richard O. Collins Award in African Studies, the New Netherland Institute Hendricks Award, and the Clague and Carol Van Slyke Prize.

The Virgin, the King, and the Royal Slaves of El Cobre

Negotiating Freedom in Colonial Cuba, 1670-1780

Author: María Elena Díaz

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804747134

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 3781

This book tells the extraordinary story of a village of peasants and miners who were slaves belonging to the king of Spain and whose local patroness was a vision of the virgin. It explores the ways the royal slaves, assisted by te force of popular religion, achieved a degree of freedom unprecedented in other colonial societies of the New World.

Masters and Slaves

Revisioned Essays in Political Philosophy

Author: Michael Palmer

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739102770

Category: Philosophy

Page: 163

View: 873

This collection of essays sheds light on the writings of leading figures in the history of political philosophy by exploring a nexus of questions concerning mastery and slavery in the human soul. To this end, Masters and Slaves elucidates archetypal human alternatives in their import for political life: the philosopher and king; the lover of wisdom and the lover of glory; the king and the tyrant; and finally, the master and the slave. Palmer re-examines these ideas as a framework for achieving a deeper understanding of the work of famous thinkers from the ancient to modern times including Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, and Rousseau. As well, the book addresses distinctions between the 'ancients' and the 'moderns, ' and touches on the work of contemporary theorists such as Leo Strauss, George Parkin Grant, and Allan Bloom."

Metaphor and the Slave Trade in West African Literature

Author: Laura T. Murphy

Publisher: Ohio University Press

ISBN: 0821444123

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 264

View: 8825

Metaphor and the Slave Trade provides compelling evidence of the hidden but unmistakable traces of the transatlantic slave trade that persist in West African discourse. Through an examination of metaphors that describe the trauma, loss, and suffering associated with the commerce in human lives, this book shows how the horrors of slavery are communicated from generation to generation. Laura T. Murphy’s insightful new readings of canonical West African fiction, autobiography, drama, and poetry explore the relationship between memory and metaphor and emphasize how repressed or otherwise marginalized memories can be transmitted through images, tropes, rumors, and fears. By analyzing the unique codes through which West Africans have represented the slave trade, this work foregrounds African literary contributions to Black Atlantic discourse and draws attention to the archive that metaphor unlocks for scholars of all disciplines and fields of study.

Oroonoko

Or, the Royal Slave

Author: Aphra Behn

Publisher: The Floating Press

ISBN: 1775415600

Category: Fiction

Page: 115

View: 2447

Aphra Behn was one of the first professional English female writers and Oroonoko was one of her earliest works. It is the love story between Oroonoko, the grandson of an African king, and the daughter of that king's general. The king takes the girl into his harem, and when she plans to escape with his grandson, sells her as a slave. When Oroonoko tries to follow her he is caught by an English slave trader and taken to the same West Indian island as his love.

The history of slavery and the slave trade

Author: W.O. Blake

Publisher: Рипол Классик

ISBN: 5872559410

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 8469

The history of slavery and the slave trade, ancient and modern: the forms of slavery that prevailed in ancient nations, particularly in Greece and Rome; the African slave trade and the political history of slavery in the United States.

Africa and the West: From the slave trade to conquest, 1441-1905

Author: William H. Worger,Nancy L. Clark,Edward A. Alpers

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0195373480

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 4204

Volume 2 picks up on the theme of conquest and covers the implementation of colonial rule, education, labor, nationalist movements, the world wars, decolonization, and independence. These documents include a German school examination for African children, the Natives Land Act from South Africa, a report on the impact of colonialism on women from the founder of the Women's League of the African National Congress, and Nelson Mandela's presidential address "No Easy Walk to Freedom."

Al-Hind the Making of the Indo-Islamic World

The Slave Kings and the Islamic Conquest : 11Th-13th Centuries

Author: André Wink

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004102361

Category: Social Science

Page: 427

View: 8925

This is the second of a projected series of five volumes dealing with the expansion of Islam in "al-Hind," or South and Southeast Asia. It analyses the conquest of the eleventh-thirteenth centuries, the migration of Muslim groups into the subcontinent, and maritime developments in the same period.

Another America: The Story of Liberia and the Former Slaves Who Ruled It

Author: James Ciment

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: 1429946881

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 8254

The first popular history of the former American slaves who founded, ruled, and lost Africa's first republic In 1820, a group of about eighty African Americans reversed the course of history and sailed back to Africa, to a place they would name after liberty itself. They went under the banner of the American Colonization Society, a white philanthropic organization with a dual agenda: to rid America of its blacks, and to convert Africans to Christianity. The settlers staked out a beachhead; their numbers grew as more boats arrived; and after breaking free from their white overseers, they founded Liberia—Africa's first black republic—in 1847. James Ciment's Another America is the first full account of this dramatic experiment. With empathy and a sharp eye for human foibles, Ciment reveals that the Americo-Liberians struggled to live up to their high ideals. They wrote a stirring Declaration of Independence but re-created the social order of antebellum Dixie, with themselves as the master caste. Building plantations, holding elegant soirees, and exploiting and even helping enslave the native Liberians, the persecuted became the persecutors—until a lowly native sergeant murdered their president in 1980, ending 133 years of Americo rule. The rich cast of characters in Another America rivals that of any novel. We encounter Marcus Garvey, who coaxed his followers toward Liberia in the 1920s, and the rubber king Harvey Firestone, who built his empire on the backs of native Liberians. Among the Americoes themselves, we meet the brilliant intellectual Edward Blyden, one of the first black nationalists; the Baltimore-born explorer Benjamin Anderson, seeking a legendary city of gold in the Liberian hinterland; and President William Tubman, a descendant of Georgia slaves, whose economic policies brought Cadillacs to the streets of Monrovia, the Liberian capital. And then there are the natives, men like Joseph Samson, who was adopted by a prominent Americo family and later presided over the execution of his foster father during the 1980 coup. In making Liberia, the Americoes transplanted the virtues and vices of their country of birth. The inspiring and troubled history they created is, to a remarkable degree, the mirror image of our own.

The Turnip Princess and Other Newly Discovered Fairy Tales

Author: Franz Xaver von Schonwerth

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0698144554

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 8978

A rare discovery in the world of fairy tales—now for the first time in English Move over, Cinderella: Make way for the Turnip Princess! And for the “Cinderfellas” in these stories, which turn our understanding of gender in fairy tales on its head. With this volume, the holy trinity of fairy tales—the Brothers Grimm, Charles Perrault, and Hans Christian Andersen—becomes a quartet. In the 1850s, Franz Xaver von Schönwerth traversed the forests, lowlands, and mountains of northern Bavaria to record fairy tales, gaining the admiration of even the Brothers Grimm. Most of Schönwerth's work was lost—until a few years ago, when thirty boxes of manu­scripts were uncovered in a German municipal archive. Now, for the first time, Schönwerth's lost fairy tales are available in English. Violent, dark, and full of action, and upending the relationship between damsels in distress and their dragon-slaying heroes, these more than seventy stories bring us closer than ever to the unadorned oral tradition in which fairy tales are rooted, revolutionizing our understanding of a hallowed genre. For more than sixty-five years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,500 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. From the Trade Paperback edition.