The Journal, 1837-1861

Author: Henry David Thoreau,Damion Searls

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 159017321X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 667

View: 8788

The largest one-volume edition of the American thinker's journals ever published captures the scope, rhythms, and variety of the work as a whole, exploring the source from which Thoreau drew his timeless books and essays. Original.

The Journal of Henry David Thoreau, 1837-1861

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 1590174402

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 704

View: 6492

Henry David Thoreau’s Journal was his life’s work: the daily practice of writing that accompanied his daily walks, the workshop where he developed his books and essays, and a project in its own right—one of the most intensive explorations ever made of the everyday environment, the revolving seasons, and the changing self. It is a treasure trove of some of the finest prose in English and, for those acquainted with it, its prismatic pages exercise a hypnotic fascination. Yet at roughly seven thousand pages, or two million words, it remains Thoreau’s least-known work. This reader’s edition, the largest one-volume edition of Thoreau’s Journal ever published, is the first to capture the scope, rhythms, and variety of the work as a whole. Ranging freely over the world at large, the Journal is no less devoted to the life within. As Thoreau says, “It is in vain to write on the seasons unless you have the seasons in you.”

A Year in Thoreau's Journal

1851

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780140390858

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 339

View: 7502

A complete year from Thoreau's journal offers an incisive look at the author's writing and thoughts.

I to Myself

An Annotated Selection from the Journal of Henry D. Thoreau

Author: Henry David Thoreau,Jeffrey S. Cramer

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300111729

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 493

View: 5731

This beautifully produced gift edition of Thoreaus journal has been carefullyselected and annotated by Jeffrey S. Cramer.

Selections from the Journals

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486144682

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 64

View: 6964

Masterly meditations on man, society, nature and many other subjects-expressed with verve and vigor in beautiful, poetic prose. Perfect entrée to Thoreau's thought. Introduction.

Writing Nature

Henry Thoreau's Journal

Author: Sharon Cameron

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226092287

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 173

View: 3780

At his death, Henry Thoreau left the majority of his writing unpublished. The bulk of this material is a journal that he kept for twenty-four years. Sharon Cameron's major claim is that this private work (the Journal) was Thoreau's primary work, taking precedence over the books that he published in his lifetime. Her controversial thesis views Thoreau's Journal as a composition that confounds the distinction between public and private—the basis on which our conventional treatment of discourse depends.

The Heart of Thoreau's Journals

Author: Odell Shepard

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486118894

Category: Nature

Page: 256

View: 4771

The conflict between scientific observation and poetry, reflections on abolition, transcendental philosophy, other concerns are explored in this superb general selection from Thoreau's voluminous Journal.

Journal

Author: Henry David Thoreau,John C. Broderick,Robert Sattelmeyer,Sandra Harbert Petrulionis

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691065373

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 480

View: 6900

From 1837 to 1861, Thoreau kept a Journal that began as a conventional record of ideas, grew into a writer's notebook, and eventually became the principal imaginative work of his career. The source of much of his published writing, the Journal is also a record of both his interior life and his monumental studies of the natural history of his native Concord, Massachusetts. In contrast to earlier editions, the Princeton Edition reproduces the Journal in its original and complete form, in a reading text that is free of editorial interpolations but keyed to a comprehensive scholarly apparatus. Journal 6 comprises a single manuscript notebook of nearly five hundred pages that Thoreau filled between March 9 and August 18, 1853. During this period, Thoreau divided his energies among his increasingly professional studies as a naturalist in Concord, the revision of his Walden manuscript, and surveying, which provided him a living and established him more securely as a contributing member of the Concord community. Thoreau's writing and his understanding of natural history were enriched by surveying, which gave him the opportunity to regularly observe seasonal occurrences and other natural events in and around Concord. Thoreau recorded these observations in his Journal, making both literary and scientific use of them. Substantial passages from Journal 6 were incorporated into the sixth draft of Walden, and its observations formed the basis for later compilations of field ecology. They are made available here, along with Journal entries, completely unrevised. This volume will delight all custodians of literary and natural history and be an essential addition to the libraries of all Thoreau devotees.

Thoreau and the Art of Life

Reflections on Nature and the Mystery of Existence

Author: Henry David Thoreau,Roderick MacIver

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781556438837

Category: Art

Page: 95

View: 6884

Combines nearly 100 luminous watercolor illustrations with eloquent passages from the writings of the American transcendentalist author and philosopher, in a book that draws largely from Thoreau's journals to reveal his ideas about nature, creativity, spirituality, aging and wisdom. Original.

Henry David Thoreau

A Life

Author: Laura Dassow Walls

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022634472X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 640

View: 9384

“Walden. Yesterday I came here to live.” That entry from the journal of Henry David Thoreau, and the intellectual journey it began, would by themselves be enough to place Thoreau in the American pantheon. His attempt to “live deliberately” in a small woods at the edge of his hometown of Concord has been a touchstone for individualists and seekers since the publication of Walden in 1854. But there was much more to Thoreau than his brief experiment in living at Walden Pond. A member of the vibrant intellectual circle centered on his neighbor Ralph Waldo Emerson, he was also an ardent naturalist, a manual laborer and inventor, a radical political activist, and more. Many books have taken up various aspects of Thoreau’s character and achievements, but, as Laura Dassow Walls writes, “Thoreau has never been captured between covers; he was too quixotic, mischievous, many-sided.” Two hundred years after his birth, and two generations after the last full-scale biography, Walls restores Henry David Thoreau to us in all his profound, inspiring complexity. Walls traces the full arc of Thoreau’s life, from his early days in the intellectual hothouse of Concord, when the American experiment still felt fresh and precarious, and “America was a family affair, earned by one generation and about to pass to the next.” By the time he died in 1862, at only forty-four years of age, Thoreau had witnessed the transformation of his world from a community of farmers and artisans into a bustling, interconnected commercial nation. What did that portend for the contemplative individual and abundant, wild nature that Thoreau celebrated? Drawing on Thoreau’s copious writings, published and unpublished, Walls presents a Thoreau vigorously alive in all his quirks and contradictions: the young man shattered by the sudden death of his brother; the ambitious Harvard College student; the ecstatic visionary who closed Walden with an account of the regenerative power of the Cosmos. We meet the man whose belief in human freedom and the value of labor made him an uncompromising abolitionist; the solitary walker who found society in nature, but also found his own nature in the society of which he was a deeply interwoven part. And, running through it all, Thoreau the passionate naturalist, who, long before the age of environmentalism, saw tragedy for future generations in the human heedlessness around him. “The Thoreau I sought was not in any book, so I wrote this one,” says Walls. The result is a Thoreau unlike any seen since he walked the streets of Concord, a Thoreau for our time and all time.

Thoreau's Animals

Author: Henry David Thoreau,Debby Cotter Kaspari,Geoff Wisner

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300223765

Category: Nature

Page: 280

View: 4910

From Thoreau's renowned Journal, a treasury of memorable, funny, and sharply observed accounts of his encounters with the wild and domestic animals of Concord Many of the most vivid writings in the renowned Journal of Henry David Thoreau concern creatures he came upon when rambling the fields, forests, and wetlands of Concord and nearby communities. A keen and thoughtful observer, he wrote frequently about these animals, always sensitive to their mysteries and deeply appreciative of their beauty and individuality. Whether serenading the perch of Walden Pond with his flute, chasing a loon across the water's surface, observing a battle between black and red ants, or engaging in a battle of wits with his family's runaway pig, Thoreau penned his journal entries with the accuracy of a scientist and the deep spirituality of a transcendentalist and mystic. This volume, like its companion Thoreau's Wildflowers, is arranged by the days of the year, following the progress of the turning seasons. A selection of his original sketchbook drawings is included, along with thirty-five exquisite illustrations by naturalist and artist Debby Cotter Kaspari.

Autumnal Tints

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Applewood Books

ISBN: 155709442X

Category: Nature

Page: 62

View: 5153

Two institutions of New England, our fall colors and Henry David Thoreau, are brought together in this posthumously published rumination on Nature. Autumnal Tints was originally published in the October 1862 Atlantic Monthly. "October is the month for painted leaves. Their rich glow now flashes round the world. As fruits and leaves and the day itself acquire a bright tint just before they fall, so the year near its setting. October is its sunset sky; November the later twilight."

Supper of the Lamb

A Culinary Reflection

Author: Robert F. Capon

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0374272018

Category: Cooking

Page: 288

View: 8231

Combining a glorification of life with a celebration of food, the author presents his favorite recipes, information on cooking and feasting, and comments on beauty, love, and grave

The Nerdist Way

How to Reach the Next Level (In Real Life)

Author: Chris Hardwick

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101548053

Category: Self-Help

Page: 304

View: 2871

Nerd superstar Chris Hardwick offers his fellow "creative obsessives" crucial information needed to come out on top in the current Nerd uprising. As a lifelong member of "The Nerd Herd," as he calls it, Chris Hardwick has learned all there is to know about Nerds. Developing a system, blog, and podcasts, Hardwick shares hard-earned wisdom about turning seeming weakness into world-dominating strengths in the hilarious self-help book, The Nerdist Way. From keeping their heart rate below hummingbird levels to managing the avalanche of sadness that is their in-boxes; from becoming evil geniuses to attracting wealth by turning down work, Hardwick reveals the secrets that can help readers achieve their goals by tapping into their true nerdtastic selves. Here Nerds will learn how to: Become their own time cop Tell panic attacks to go suck it Use incremental fitness to ward off predators A Nerd's brain is a laser-it's time they learn to point and fire!

Land of a Thousand Hills

My Life in Rwanda

Author: Rosamond Halsey Carr,Ann Howard Halsey

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101143517

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 4989

In 1949, Rosamond Halsey Carr, a young fashion illustrator living in New York City, accompanied her dashing hunter-explorer husband to what was then the Belgian Congo. When the marriage fell apart, she decided to stay on in neighboring Rwanda, as the manager of a flower plantation. Land of a Thousand Hills is Carr's thrilling memoir of her life in Rwanda—a love affair with a country and a people that has spanned half a century. During those years, she has experienced everything from stalking leopards to rampaging elephants, drought, the mysterious murder of her friend Dian Fossey, and near-bankruptcy. She has chugged up the Congo River on a paddle-wheel steamboat, been serenaded by pygmies, and witnessed firsthand the collapse of colonialism. Following 1994's Hutu-Tutsi genocide, Carr turned her plantation into a shelter for the lost and orphaned children-work she continues to this day, at the age of eighty-seven.

Expect Great Things

The Life and Search of Henry David Thoreau

Author: Kevin Dann

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0399184686

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 9376

To coincide with the bicentennial of Thoreau's birth in 2017, this thrilling, meticulous biography by naturalist and historian Kevin Dann fills a gap in our understanding of one modern history's most important spiritual visionaries by capturing the full arc of Thoreau's life as a mystic, spiritual seeker, and explorer in transcendental realms. This sweeping, epic biography of Henry David Thoreau sees Thoreau's world as the mystic himself saw it: filled with wonder and mystery; Native American myths and lore; wood sylphs, nature spirits, and fairies; battles between good and evil; and heroic struggles to live as a natural being in an increasingly synthetic world. Above all, Expect Great Things critically and authoritatively captures Thoreau's simultaneously wild and intellectually keen sense of the mystical, mythical, and supernatural. Other historians have skipped past or undervalued these aspects of Thoreau's life. In this groundbreaking work, historian and naturalist Kevin Dann restores Thoreau's esoteric visions and explorations to their rightful place as keystones of the man himself.

The Boatman

Henry David Theoreau's River Years

Author: Robert M. Thorson

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674977726

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 2321

Robert Thorson gives readers a Thoreau for the Anthropocene. The boatman and backyard naturalist was keenly aware of the way humans had altered the waterways and meadows of his beloved Concord River Valley. Yet he sought out for solace and pleasure those river sites most dramatically altered by human invention and intervention—for better and worse.

Henry David Thoreau

Three Complete Books

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Gramercy Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: American essays

Page: 536

View: 9533

A collection of three great works by the naturalist, writer, philosopher, and leading thinker of the American Transcendentalist movement includes Walden, The Maine Woods, and Cape Cod.

The Company of Wolves

Author: Peter Steinhart

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307798488

Category: Nature

Page: 400

View: 5219

As wolves return to their old territory in Yellowstone National Park, their presence is reawakening passions as ancient as their tangled relations with human beings. This authoritative and eloquent book coaxes the wolf out from its camouflage of myth and reveals the depth of its kinship with humanity, which shares this animal's complex complex social organization, intense family ties, and predatory streak.

The Portable Thoreau

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101128107

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 656

View: 659

An updated edition of Thoreau's most widely read works Self-described as "a mystic, a transcendentalist, and a natural philosopher to boot," Henry David Thoreau dedicated his life to preserving his freedom as a man and as an artist. Nature was the fountainhead of his inspiration and his refuge from what he considered the follies of society. Heedless of his friends' advice to live in a more orthodox manner, he determinedly pursued his own inner bent-that of a poet-philosopher-in prose and verse. Edited by noted Thoreau scholar Jeffrey S. Cramer, this edition promises to be the new standard for those interested in discovering the great thinker's influential ideas about everything from environmentalism to limited government. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. From the Trade Paperback edition.