Emigrant Players

Sport and the Irish Diaspora

Author: Paul Darby,David Hassan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131796845X

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 218

View: 886

Ireland and its inhabitants have often been described as being ‘sports mad’. As a relatively small geographical entity, Ireland, north and south, has produced a disproportionately high number of world class sports men and women who have excelled at the highest levels of their chosen sport. The significance of sport in Ireland though extends far beyond the achievements of such individuals. Sport has historically assumed a centrality in the lives of the island’s inhabitants, a fact that can be measured by the numbers and commitment of participants as well as the emotional and financial investment of fans. This book seeks to address the ways in which Irish aptitude and ebullience for sport has manifested itself in those parts of the world that have or have had relatively large Irish communities. The first part of the book explores the diffusion of Gaelic games to a number of centres of Irish immigration and examines the social, economic, political and psychological impact that these games had in helping the Diaspora adjust to life in what were often inhospitable environs. The second part of the book extends the analysis by examining the contribution of Irish sports men and women to the sports culture that they encountered in their new homes and assessing the ways in which their involvement in these sports allowed them to come to terms with and make their way in their new locales. This book was previously published as a special issue of the journal, Sport in Society

The Irish Diaspora

Author: Andrew Bielenberg

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317878124

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 4463

This book brings together a series of articles which provide an overview of the Irish Diaspora from a global perspective. It combines a series of survey articles on the major destinations of the Diaspora; the USA, Britian and the British Empire. On each of these, there is a number of more specialist articles by historians, demographers, economists, sociologists and geographers. The inter-disciplinary approach of the book, with a strong historical and modern focus, provides the first comprehensive survey of the topic.

Imperial Spaces

Placing the Irish and Scots in Colonial Australia

Author: Lindsay J. Proudfoot,DianneP. Hall

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1847794513

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 3291

Imperial spaces takes two of the most influential minority groups of white settlers in the British Empire - the Irish and the Scots - and explores how they imagined themselves within the landscapes of its farthest reaches, the Australian colonies of Victoria and New South Wales. Using letters and diaries as well as records of collective activities such as committee meetings, parades and dinners, the book examines how the Irish and Scots built new identities as settlers in the unknown spaces of Empire. Utilizing critical geographical theories of 'place' as the site of memory and agency, it considers how Irish and Scots settlers grounded their sense of belonging in the imagined landscapes of south-east Australia. Imperial spaces is relevant to academics and students interested in the history and geography of the British Empire, Australia, Ireland and Scotland.

A New History of Ireland Volume VII

Ireland, 1921-84

Author: J. R. Hill

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191615595

Category: History

Page: 1254

View: 5832

A New History of Ireland is the largest scholarly project in modern Irish history. In 9 volumes, it provides a comprehensive new synthesis of modern scholarship on every aspect of Irish history and prehistory, from the earliest geological and archaeological evidence, through the Middle Ages, down to the present day. Volume VII covers a period of major significance in Ireland's history. It outlines the division of Ireland and the eventual establishment of the Irish Republic. It provides comprehensive coverage of political developments, north and south, as well as offering chapters on the economy, literature in English and Irish, the Irish language, the visual arts, emigration and immigration, and the history of women. The contributors to this volume, all specialists in their field, provide the most comprehensive treatment of these developments of any single-volume survey of twentieth-century Ireland.

A New History of Ireland

Ireland Under the Union, 1870-1921

Author: W. E. Vaughan,Theodore William Moody,Francis X. Martin,William Edward Vaughan,Francis John Byrne

Publisher: New History of Ireland

ISBN: 0199583749

Category: History

Page: 917

View: 5815

A New History of Ireland is the largest scholarly project in modern Irish history. In 9 volumes, it provides a comprehensive new synthesis of modern scholarship on every aspect of Irish history and prehistory, from the earliest geological and archaeological evidence, through the Middle Ages, down to the present day. Volume VI opens with a character study of the period, followed by ten chapters of narrative history, and a study of Ireland in 1914. It includes further chapters on the economy, literature, the Irish language, music, arts, education, administration and the public service, and emigration.

Ireland's New Worlds

Immigrants, Politics, and Society in the United States and Australia, 1815–1922

Author: Malcolm Campbell

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299223304

Category: History

Page: 249

View: 5069

In the century between the Napoleonic Wars and the Irish Civil War, more than seven million Irish men and women left their homeland to begin new lives abroad. While the majority settled in the United States, Irish emigrants dispersed across the globe, many of them finding their way to another “New World,” Australia. Ireland’s New Worlds is the first book to compare Irish immigrants in the United States and Australia. In a profound challenge to the national histories that frame most accounts of the Irish diaspora, Malcolm Campbell highlights the ways that economic, social, and cultural conditions shaped distinct experiences for Irish immigrants in each country, and sometimes in different parts of the same country. From differences in the level of hostility that Irish immigrants faced to the contrasting economies of the United States and Australia, Campbell finds that there was much more to the experiences of Irish immigrants than their essential “Irishness.” America’s Irish, for example, were primarily drawn into the population of unskilled laborers congregating in cities, while Australia’s Irish, like their fellow colonialists, were more likely to engage in farming. Campbell shows how local conditions intersected with immigrants’ Irish backgrounds and traditions to create surprisingly varied experiences in Ireland’s new worlds. Outstanding Book, selected by the American Association of School Librarians, and Best Books for Special Interests, selected by the Public Library Association “Well conceived and thoroughly researched . . . . This clearly written, thought-provoking work fulfills the considerable ambitions of comparative migration studies.”—Choice

Industry, Trade and People in Ireland, 1650-1950

Essays in Honour of W.H. Crawford

Author: W. H. Crawford,Brenda Collins,Philip Ollerenshaw,Trevor Parkhill

Publisher: Ulster Historical Foundation

ISBN: 9781903688564

Category: History

Page: 290

View: 4306

Bill Crawford had played a key role in the development of Irish economic, social and regional history for over forty years. The essays in this book are testimony to his many spheres of influence - as teacher, archivist, curator, researcher and writer - and focus on the themes in which Bill himself has been most interested: the relations between town and countryside, the linen industry and trade, land and population. His innovative use of historical sources, extensive scholarship, many publications and the enthusiasm for research which he imparts to so many people are acknowledged in this wide-ranging volume.

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History

Author: Alvin Jackson

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191667609

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 8328

The study of Irish history, once riven and constricted, has recently enjoyed a resurgence, with new practitioners, new approaches, and new methods of investigation. The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History represents the diversity of this emerging talent and achievement by bringing together 36 leading scholars of modern Ireland and embracing 400 years of Irish history, uniting early and late modernists as well as contemporary historians. The Handbook offers a set of scholarly perspectives drawn from numerous disciplines, including history, political science, literature, geography, and the Irish language. It looks at the Irish at home as well as in their migrant and diasporic communities. The Handbook combines sets of wide thematic and interpretative essays, with more detailed investigations of particular periods. Each of the contributors offers a summation of the state of scholarship within their subject area, linking their own research insights with assessments of future directions within the discipline. In its breadth and depth and diversity, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History offers an authoritative and vibrant portrayal of the history of modern Ireland.

Social change and everyday life in Ireland, 1850-1922

Author: Caitriona Clear

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 1847796656

Category: History

Page: 206

View: 2637

Men and women who were born, grew up and died in Ireland between 1850 and 1922 made decisions - to train, to emigrate, to stay at home, to marry, to stay single, to stay at school - based on the knowledge and resources they had at the time. This, the first comprehensive social history of Ireland for the years 1850-1922 to appear since 1981, tries to understand that knowledge and to discuss those resources, for men and women at all social levels on the island as a whole. Original research, particularly on extreme poverty and public health, is supplemented by neglected published sources - local history journals, popular autobiography, newspapers. Folklore and Irish language sources are used extensively. All recent scholarly books in Irish social history are, of course, referred to throughout the book, but it is a lively read, reproducing the voices of the people and the stories of individuals whenever it can, questioning much of the accepted wisdom of Irish historiography over the past five decades. Statistics are used from time to time for illustrative purposes, but tables and graphs are consigned to the appendix at the back. There are some illustrations. An idea summary for the student, loaded with prompts for future research, this book is written in a non-cliched, jargon-free style aimed at the general reader.

To the Ends of the Earth

Scotland's Global Diaspora, 1750-2010

Author: T. M. Devine

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0241960649

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 1019

SPECTATOR, NEW STATESMAN, SCOTLAND ON SUNDAY and THE HERALD BOOKS OF THE YEAR The Scots are one of the world's greatest nations of emigrants. For centuries, untold numbers of men, women and children have sought their fortunes in every conceivable walk of life and in every imaginable climate across the British Empire, the United States and elsewhere, from finance to industry, philosophy to politics. To the Ends of the Earth puts this extraordinary epic centre stage, taking many famous stories and removing layers of myth and sentiment to reveal the no less startling truth, paying particular attention to the exceptional Scottish role as traders, missionaries and soldiers. This major new book is also a study of the impact of this global world on Scotland itself and the degree to which the Scottish economy was for many years an imperial economy, with intimate, important links through shipping, engineering, jute and banking to the most remote of settlements. Filled with fascinating stories and with an acute awareness of the poverty and social inequality that provoked so much emigration, To the Ends of the Earth will make its readers think about the world in quite a different way.

A New History of the Irish in Australia

Author: Dianne Hall,Elizabeth Malcolm

Publisher: NewSouth

ISBN: 1742244394

Category: SOCIAL SCIENCE

Page: 448

View: 7721

Irish immigrants – although despised as inferior on racial and religious grounds and feared as a threat to national security – were one of modern Australia’s most influential founding peoples. In his landmark 1986 book The Irish in Australia, Patrick O’Farrell argued that the Irish were central to the evolution of Australia’s national character through their refusal to accept a British identity. A New History of the Irish in Australia takes a fresh approach. It draws on source materials not used until now and focuses on topics previously neglected, such as race, stereotypes, gender, popular culture, employment discrimination, immigration restriction, eugenics, crime and mental health. This important book also considers the Irish in Australia within the worldwide Irish diaspora. Elizabeth Malcolm and Dianne Hall reveal what Irish Australians shared with Irish communities elsewhere, while reminding us that the Irish–Australian experience was – and is – unique. ‘A necessary corrective to the false unity of the term “Anglo-Celtic”, this beautifully controlled and clear-sighted intervention is timely and welcome. It gives us not just a history of the Irish in Australia, but a skilful account of how identity is formed relationally, often through sectarian, class, ethnic and racial divisions. A masterful book.’ — Professor Rónán McDonald, University of Melbourne

Irish Women in Colonial Australia

Author: Trevor McClaughlin

Publisher: Allen & Unwin

ISBN: 1743439369

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 6834

The women of Ireland, bond or free, have left a distinctive mark on Australia's population and culture. Irish Women in Colonial Australia provides an intriguing picture of the richness and variety of the Irish experience in the making of a new nation. Ireland provided the majority of female convicts for the first forty years of the penal colony, and Irish women made up a significant proportion of assisted and free immigrants throughout the nineteenth century. Through nine lively essays, a rare collaboration between family historians and professional historians enables the reader to range across the lives of murderers and orphans, workers and the new rich, country maids and slum dwellers. Who were these women? Why did they come here? What did they bring with them? And what did they make of their lives in the raw, new world so different from the world they left behind?

Language and Identity

Discourse in the World

Author: David Evans

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 0567566145

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 256

View: 3582

Language not only expresses identities but also constructs them. Starting from that point, Language and Identity examines the interrelationships between language and identities. It finds that they are so closely interwoven, that words themselves are inscribed with ideological meanings. Words and language constitute meanings within discourses and discourses vary in power. The powerful ones reproduce more powerful meanings, colonize other discourses and marginalize or silence the least powerful languages and cultures. Language and culture death occur in extreme cases of marginalization. This book also demonstrates the socio-economic opportunities offered by language choice and the cultural allegiances of language, where groups have been able to create new lives for themselves by embracing new languages in new countries. Language can be a 'double-edged sword' of opportunity and marginalization. Language and Identity argues that bilingualism and in some cases multilingualism can both promote socio-economic opportunity and combat culture death and marginalization. With sound theoretical perspectives drawing upon the work of Bakhtin, Vygotsky, Gumperz, Foucault and others, this book provides readers with a rationale to redress social injustice in the world by supporting minority linguistic and cultural identities and an acknowledgement that access to language can provide opportunity.

The Global Dimensions of Irish Identity

Race, Nation, and the Popular Press, 1840-1880

Author: Cian T. McMahon

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469620111

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 9035

Though Ireland is a relatively small island on the northeastern fringe of the Atlantic, 70 million people worldwide--including some 45 million in the United States--claim it as their ancestral home. In this wide-ranging, ambitious book, Cian T. McMahon explores the nineteenth-century roots of this transnational identity. Between 1840 and 1880, 4.5 million people left Ireland to start new lives abroad. Using primary sources from Ireland, Australia, and the United States, McMahon demonstrates how this exodus shaped a distinctive sense of nationalism. By doggedly remaining loyal to both their old and new homes, he argues, the Irish helped broaden the modern parameters of citizenship and identity. From insurrection in Ireland to exile in Australia to military service during the American Civil War, McMahon's narrative revolves around a group of rebels known as Young Ireland. They and their fellow Irish used weekly newspapers to construct and express an international identity tailored to the fluctuating world in which they found themselves. Understanding their experience sheds light on our contemporary debates over immigration, race, and globalization.

Irish 'Ingleses'

The Irish Immigrant Experience in Argentina, 1840-1920

Author: Helen Kelly

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780716530077

Category: History

Page: 250

View: 3194

This is the first book-length analysis of the Irish in Argentina. The experience of the Irish in Argentina was qualitatively different from that of Australia, Britain, or the United States, and this study employs a comparative methodology both in relation to the more established Irish immigrant destinations, as well as to European immigration as a whole. Against established destinations of nineteenth-century Irish settlement, Argentina was unique. Separated immediately from the native populace by language and culture, Irish immigrants were quickly identified by the governing Argentine hosts into the broader English-speaking community with ambivalent consequences for the Irish migrants. The distinct socio-economic advantages experienced by 'Ingleses' within a particularly Euro-centric Argentina facilitated and encouraged the diminution of ethnic distinctions. But the conflicting identities which emerged contributed to the distinct development of the Irish community within this unique nineteenth-century Latin environment.

Emigrant Homecomings

The Return Movements of Emigrants, 1600-2000

Author: Marjory Harper

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719070709

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 4599

"In twelve essays, Emigrant homecomings analyses the motives, experiences and impact of these returning migrants in a wide range of locations over four hundred years, as well as examining the mechanisms and technologies which enabled their return." -- Back cover.

Music \= Cultures in Contact

Convergences and Collisions

Author: Margaret J. Kartomi,Stephen Blum

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113431390X

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 248

View: 5286

First Published in 1995. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Kingdom of the Ryans

The Irish in Southwest New South Wales 1816-1890

Author: Malcolm Campbell

Publisher: New South Wales University Press

ISBN: 9780868401911

Category: History

Page: 210

View: 5138

This work is an important contribution to the new historiography on Irish emigration, which has changed our understanding of the Irish emigrant experience, adding another dimension to the Irish diaspora following the devastating series of famines in Ireland.