The Hour of Land

A Personal Topography of America's National Parks

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Sarah Crichton Books

ISBN: 0374712263

Category: Nature

Page: 416

View: 8431

America’s national parks are breathing spaces in a world in which such spaces are steadily disappearing, which is why more than 300 million people visit the parks each year. Now Terry Tempest Williams, the author of the environmental classic Refuge and the beloved memoir When Women Were Birds, returns with The Hour of Land, a literary celebration of our national parks, an exploration of what they mean to us and what we mean to them. From the Grand Tetons in Wyoming to Acadia in Maine to Big Bend in Texas and more, Williams creates a series of lyrical portraits that illuminate the unique grandeur of each place while delving into what it means to shape a landscape with its own evolutionary history into something of our own making. Part memoir, part natural history, and part social critique, The Hour of Land is a meditation and a manifesto on why wild lands matter to the soul of America.

The Hour of Land

A Personal Topography of America's National Parks

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0374280096

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 416

View: 4187

"A personal, lyrical, and idiosyncratic ode to our national parks"--

The Hour of Land

A Personal Topography of America's National Parks

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Picador

ISBN: 9781250132147

Category: Nature

Page: 416

View: 5756

America's national parks are breathing spaces in a world in which such spaces are steadily disappearing. This is why more than 300 million people visit the parks each year. In The Hour of Land, Terry Tempest Williams, author of the environmental classic Refuge and the beloved memoir When Women Were Birds , offers a gift of celebration: an exploration of our national parks, and what they mean to us and we mean to them. From the Grand Tetons in Wyoming to Acadia in Maine to Big Bend in Texas, Williams captures the unique grandeur of each place while unearthing what it means to shape a landscape with its own evolutionary history into something of our own making. Part memoir, part natural history, and part social critique, The Hour of Land is a meditation and a manifesto on why wild lands matter to the soul of America. - Now a nominee for the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence - For readers of Peter Matthiessen, Barry Lopez, and Annie Dillard - Beautiful paperback repackage with flaps makes this a perfect gift

Refuge

An Unnatural History of Family and Place

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 030777273X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 2807

In the spring of 1983 Terry Tempest Williams learned that her mother was dying of cancer. That same season, The Great Salt Lake began to rise to record heights, threatening the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge and the herons, owls, and snowy egrets that Williams, a poet and naturalist, had come to gauge her life by. One event was nature at its most random, the other a by-product of rogue technology: Terry's mother, and Terry herself, had been exposed to the fallout of atomic bomb tests in the 1950s. As it interweaves these narratives of dying and accommodation, Refuge transforms tragedy into a document of renewal and spiritual grace, resulting in a work that has become a classic.

Finding Beauty in a Broken World

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0375725199

Category: Nature

Page: 420

View: 6173

The naturalist author of Refuge and An Unspoken Hunger reflects on what it means to be human, the interconnection between the natural and human worlds, and how they combine to produce both tumult and peace, ugliness and beauty.

The Open Space of Democracy

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 160899208X

Category: Political Science

Page: 138

View: 2860

Terry Tempest Williams presents a sharp-edged perspective on the ethics and politics of place, spiritual democracy, and the responsibilities of citizen engagement. By turns elegiac, inspiring, and passionate, The Open Space of Democracy offers a fresh perspective on the critical questions of our time.

Lassoing the Sun

A Year in America's National Parks

Author: Mark Woods

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1250105900

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 7010

"In this remarkable journey, Mark Woods captures the essence of our National Parks: their serenity and majesty, complexity and vitality--and their power to heal." --Ken Burns Many childhood summers, Mark Woods piled into a station wagon with his parents and two sisters and headed to America's national parks. Mark’s most vivid childhood memories are set against a backdrop of mountains, woods, and fireflies in places like Redwood, Yosemite, and Grand Canyon national parks. On the eve of turning fifty and a little burned-out, Mark decided to reconnect with the great outdoors. He'd spend a year visiting the national parks. He planned to take his mother to a park she'd not yet visited and to re-create his childhood trips with his wife and their iPad-generation daughter. But then the unthinkable happened: his mother was diagnosed with cancer, given just months to live. Mark had initially intended to write a book about the future of the national parks, but Lassoing the Sun grew into something more: a book about family, the parks, the legacies we inherit and the ones we leave behind.

When Women Were Birds

Fifty-four Variations on Voice

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1250024110

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 4258

The author of the memoir Refuge offers a meditation on the meaning of a strange legacy that her mother left her--three shelves of the elder woman's "journals," all discovered by the author after her mother's death to be empty.

Leap

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1101912421

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 2154

With Leap, Terry Tempest Williams, award-winning author of Refuge, offers a sustained meditation on passion, faith, and creativity-based upon her transcendental encounter with Hieronymus Bosch's medieval masterpiece The Garden of Delights. Williams examines this vibrant landscape with unprecedented acuity, recognizing parallels between the artist's prophetic vision and her own personal experiences as a Mormon and a naturalist. Searing in its spiritual, intellectual, and emotional courage, Williams's divine journey enables her to realize the full extent of her faith and through her exquisite imagination opens our eyes to the splendor of the world.

Red

Passion and Patience in the Desert

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780307559401

Category: Nature

Page: 288

View: 7786

In this potent collage of stories, essays, and testimony, Williams makes a stirring case for the preservation of America’s Redrock Wilderness in the canyon country of southern Utah. As passionate as she is persuasive, Williams, the beloved author of Refuge, is one of the country’s most eloquent and imaginative writers. The desert is her blood. Here she writes lyrically about the desert’s power and vulnerability, describing wonders that range from an ancient Puebloan sash of macaw feathers found in Canyonlands National Park to the desert tortoise–an animal that can “teach us the slow art of revolutionary patience” as it extends our notion of kinship with all life. She examines the civil war being waged in the West today over public and private uses of land–an issue that divides even her own family. With grace, humor, and compassionate intelligence, Williams reminds us that the preservation of wildness is not simply a political process but a spiritual one.

An Unspoken Hunger

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 110191243X

Category: Nature

Page: 160

View: 7425

The acclaimed author of Refuge here weaves together a resonant and often rhapsodic manifesto on behalf of the landscapes she loves, combining the power of her observations in the field with her personal experience—as a woman, a Mormon, and a Westerner. Through the grace of her stories we come to see how a lack of intimacy with the natural world has initiated a lack of intimacy with each other. Williams shadows lions on the Serengeti and spots night herons in the Bronx. She pays homage to the rogue spirits of Edward Abbey and Georgia O’Keeffe, contemplates the unfathomable wildness of bears, and directs us to a politics of place. The result is an utterly persuasive book—one that has the power to change the way we live upon the earth.

Testimony

Writers of the West Speak on Behalf of Utah Wilderness

Author: Stephen Trimble,Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Gibbs Smith Publishers

ISBN: 9781571312129

Category: Nature

Page: 112

View: 483

Distinguished writers, including John McPhee, Barry Lopez, William Kittredge, Ann Zwinger, and Mark Strand, speak out on the necessity to protect and preserve America's wilderness habitats in the face of assaults on government-protected lands by miners, developers, and other industries. Original. IP.

The Wonder of It All

100 Stories from the National Park Service

Author: Yosemite Conservancy

Publisher: Yosemite Conservancy

ISBN: 1930238703

Category: Nature

Page: 320

View: 4762

Since the founding of the National Park Service in 2016, tens of thousands of NPS employees and volunteers have devoted themselves to preserving our public lands, which today number more than 400. Each person’s NPS career is unique, seasoned with daily duties, grand adventures, and everything in between! Yet there is one common element: each person has plenty of material for terrific stories about living and working in America’s most special places. These 100 true stories from current and past NPS employees and volunteers make for an engrossing, funny, and often moving read, with something for everyone. The writers welcome visitors, ride the rails, collar caribou, reenact and make history, and every day face the mystery of wildness—including plenty of bears!—all for America’s public lands. Featuring more than 100 photograph and stories from 80 different parks, monuments, and historic sites, stretching from the coast of Maine to American Samoa, The Wonder of It All is sure to inspire a new generation to cherish the natural and cultural resources that the National Park Service was born to preserve.

Mariposas Nocturnas

Moths of Central and South America, A Study in Beauty and Diversity

Author: Emmet Gowin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691176892

Category: Art

Page: 144

View: 5012

A stunning portrait of the nocturnal moths of Central and South America by famed American photographer Emmet Gowin American photographer Emmet Gowin (b. 1941) is best known for his portraits of his wife, Edith, and their family, as well as for his images documenting the impact of human activity upon landscapes around the world. For the past fifteen years, he has been engaged in an equally profound project on a different scale, capturing the exquisite beauty of more than one thousand species of nocturnal moths in Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, French Guiana, and Panama. These stunning color portraits present the insects—many of which may never have been photographed as living specimens before, and some of which may not be seen again—arrayed in typologies of twenty-five per sheet. The moths are photographed alive, in natural positions and postures, and set against a variety of backgrounds taken from the natural world and images from art history. Throughout Gowin’s distinguished career, his work has addressed urgent concerns. The arresting images of Mariposas Nocturnas extend this reach, as Gowin fosters awareness for a part of nature that is generally left unobserved and calls for a greater awareness of the biodiversity and value of the tropics as a universally shared natural treasure. An essay by Gowin provides a fascinating personal history of his work with biologists and introduces both the photographic and philosophical processes behind this extraordinary project. Essential reading for audiences both in photography and natural history, this lavishly illustrated volume reminds readers that, as Terry Tempest Williams writes in her foreword, “The world is saturated with loveliness, inhabited by others far more adept at living with uncertainty than we are.”

The Secret Language of Snow

Author: Terry Tempest Williams,Ted Major

Publisher: Pantheon

ISBN: N.A

Category: Arctic regions

Page: 129

View: 6376

Examines over a dozen different types of snow and snowy conditions through the vocabulary of the Inuit people of Alaska. Discusses the physical properties and formation of the snow and how it affects the plants, animals, and people of the Arctic.

Engineering Eden

The True Story of a Violent Death, a Trial, and the Fight over Controlling Nature

Author: Jordan Fisher Smith

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 0307454282

Category: Science

Page: 384

View: 6766

The fascinating story of a trial that opened a window onto the century-long battle to control nature in the national parks. When twenty-five-year-old Harry Walker was killed by a bear in Yellowstone Park in 1972, the civil trial prompted by his death became a proxy for bigger questions about American wilderness management that had been boiling for a century. At immediate issue was whether the Park Service should have done more to keep bears away from humans, but what was revealed as the trial unfolded was just how fruitless our efforts to regulate nature in the parks had always been. The proceedings drew to the witness stand some of the most important figures in twentieth century wilderness management, including the eminent zoologist A. Starker Leopold, who had produced a landmark conservationist document in the 1950s, and all-American twin researchers John and Frank Craighead, who ran groundbreaking bear studies at Yellowstone. Their testimony would help decide whether the government owed the Walker family restitution for Harry's death, but it would also illuminate decades of patchwork efforts to preserve an idea of nature that had never existed in the first place. In this remarkable excavation of American environmental history, nature writer and former park ranger Jordan Fisher Smith uses Harry Walker's story to tell the larger narrative of the futile, sometimes fatal, attempts to remake wilderness in the name of preserving it. Tracing a course from the founding of the national parks through the tangled twentieth-century growth of the conservationist movement, Smith gives the lie to the portrayal of national parks as Edenic wonderlands unspoiled until the arrival of Europeans, and shows how virtually every attempt to manage nature in the parks has only created cascading effects that require even more management. Moving across time and between Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Glacier national parks, Engineering Eden shows how efforts at wilderness management have always been undone by one fundamental problem--that the idea of what is "wild" dissolves as soon as we begin to examine it, leaving us with little framework to say what wilderness should look like and which human interventions are acceptable in trying to preserve it. In the tradition of John McPhee's The Control of Nature and Alan Burdick's Out of Eden, Jordan Fisher Smith has produced a powerful work of popular science and environmental history, grappling with critical issues that we have even now yet to resolve.

On Trails

An Exploration

Author: Robert Moor

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476739242

Category: Nature

Page: 352

View: 9680

Winner of the Pacific Northwest Book Award “The best outdoors book of the year” —Sierra Club A New York Times Bestseller A Best Book of the Year—as chosen by The Boston Globe, The Seattle Times, Amazon, National Post, New York magazine, The Telegraph, Booklist, The Guardian Bookshop From a debut talent who’s been compared to Annie Dillard, Edward Abbey, David Quammen, and Jared Diamond, On Trails is a wondrous exploration of how trails help us understand the world—from invisible ant trails to hiking paths that span continents, from interstate highways to the Internet. In 2009, while thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail, Robert Moor began to wonder about the paths that lie beneath our feet: How do they form? Why do some improve over time while others fade? What makes us follow or strike off on our own? Over the course of the next seven years, Moor traveled the globe, exploring trails of all kinds, from the miniscule to the massive. He learned the tricks of master trail-builders, hunted down long-lost Cherokee trails, and traced the origins of our road networks and the Internet. In each chapter, Moor interweaves his adventures with findings from science, history, philosophy, and nature writing—combining the nomadic joys of Peter Matthiessen with the eclectic wisdom of Lewis Hyde’s The Gift. Throughout, Moor reveals how this single topic—the oft-overlooked trail—sheds new light on a wealth of age-old questions: How does order emerge out of chaos? How did animals first crawl forth from the seas and spread across continents? How has humanity’s relationship with nature and technology shaped world around us? And, ultimately, how does each of us pick a path through life? Moor has the essayist’s gift for making new connections, the adventurer’s love for paths untaken, and the philosopher’s knack for asking big questions. With a breathtaking arc that spans from the dawn of animal life to the digital era, On Trails is a book that makes us see our world, our history, our species, and our ways of life anew.

Island Home

A Landscape Memoir

Author: Tim Winton

Publisher: Milkweed Editions

ISBN: 1571319581

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 2448

A wild, rhapsodic celebration of Australia and its landscape, from one of its finest writers

Travels with Charley in Search of America

(Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

Author: John Steinbeck

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101615168

Category: Travel

Page: 240

View: 4404

An intimate journey across and in search of America, as told by one of its most beloved writers, in a deluxe centennial edition In September 1960, John Steinbeck embarked on a journey across America. He felt that he might have lost touch with the country, with its speech, the smell of its grass and trees, its color and quality of light, the pulse of its people. To reassure himself, he set out on a voyage of rediscovery of the American identity, accompanied by a distinguished French poodle named Charley; and riding in a three-quarter-ton pickup truck named Rocinante. His course took him through almost forty states: northward from Long Island to Maine; through the Midwest to Chicago; onward by way of Minnesota, North Dakota, Montana (with which he fell in love), and Idaho to Seattle, south to San Francisco and his birthplace, Salinas; eastward through the Mojave, New Mexico, Arizona, to the vast hospitality of Texas, to New Orleans and a shocking drama of desegregation; finally, on the last leg, through Alabama, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey to New York. Travels with Charley in Search of America is an intimate look at one of America's most beloved writers in the later years of his life—a self-portrait of a man who never wrote an explicit autobiography. Written during a time of upheaval and racial tension in the South—which Steinbeck witnessed firsthand—Travels with Charley is a stunning evocation of America on the eve of a tumultuous decade. This Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition also features French flaps and deckle-edged paper. For more than sixty-five years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,500 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. From the Trade Paperback edition.