The Future of Whiteness

Author: Linda Martín Alcoff

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 074568548X

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 2622

White identity is in ferment. White, European Americans living in the United States will soon share an unprecedented experience of slipping below 50% of the population. The impending demographic shifts are already felt in most urban centers and the effect is a national backlash of hyper-mobilized political, and sometimes violent, activism with a stated aim that is simultaneously vague and deadly clear: 'to take our country back.' Meanwhile the spectre of 'minority status' draws closer, and the material advantages of being born white are eroding. This is the political and cultural reality tackled by Linda Martín Alcoff in The Future of Whiteness. She argues that whiteness is here to stay, at least for a while, but that half of whites have given up on ideas of white supremacy, and the shared public, material culture is more integrated than ever. More and more, whites are becoming aware of how they appear to non-whites, both at home and abroad, and this is having profound effects on white identity in North America. The young generation of whites today, as well as all those who follow, will have never known a country in which they could take white identity as the unchallenged default that dominates the political, economic and cultural leadership. Change is on the horizon, and the most important battleground is among white people themselves. The Future of Whiteness makes no predictions but astutely analyzes the present reaction and evaluates the current signs of turmoil. Beautifully written and cogently argued, the book looks set to spark debate in the field and to illuminate an important area of racial politics.

The Future Of Democratic Equality

Rebuilding Social Solidarity in a Fragmented America

Author: Joseph M. Schwartz

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135944539

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 5921

2011 David Easton Award, presented for the best book by the Foundations of Political Theory section of APSA: "The Future of Democratic Equality, by Joseph Schwartz, takes on three tasks, and accomplishes all brilliantly. Any one of these tasks well fulfilled would have been a laudable achievement. First, Schwartz argues for the centrality of the question of equality to democratic politics. Second, he critically analyzes and explains the shocking rise in inequality in the United States over the last three decades. This he does with conceptual clarity, rich interdisciplinary analysis, and a thorough examination of hard socioeconomic data. Third, he assails the near absence of concern for this soaring inequality among contemporary political theorists, and offers a cogent, and stinging, explanation that takes to task the discipline’s preoccupation with difference and identity severed from the pragmatics of democratic equality. The Future of Democratic Equality is a courageous and disciplined effort to tackle a hugely important political problem and intellectual puzzle. It well embodies the spirit of the Easton Book Award by providing well-grounded normative theory targeted to an urgent matter of contemporary concern. It is a must read for anyone who cares about democracy." - Respectfully submitted by Leslie Paul Thiele, University of Florida (chair) and Cary J. Nederman, Texas A&M University Why has contemporary radical political theory remained virtually silent about the stunning rise in inequality in the United States over the past thirty years? Schwartz contends that since the 1980s, most radical theorists shifted their focus away from interrogating social inequality to criticizing the liberal and radical tradition for being inattentive to the role of difference and identity within social life. This critique brought more awareness of the relative autonomy of gender, racial, and sexual oppression. But, as Schwartz argues, it also led many theorists to forget that if difference is institutionalized on a terrain of radical economic inequality, unjust inequalities in social and political power will inevitably persist. Schwartz cautions against a new radical theoretical orthodoxy: that "universal" norms such as equality and solidarity are inherently repressive and homogenizing, whereas particular norms and identities are truly emancipatory. Reducing inequality among Americans, as well as globally, will take a high level of social solidarity--a level far from today's fragmented politics. In focusing the left's attention on the need to reconstruct a governing model that speaks to the aspirations of the majority, Schwartz provocatively applies this vision to such real world political issues as welfare reform, race relations, childcare, and the democratic regulation of the global economy.

Popular Culture and the Future of Politics

Cultural Studies and the Tao of South Park

Author: Ted Gournelos

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780739137215

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 285

View: 8231

Popular Culture and the Future of Politics: Cultural Studies and the Tao of South Park argues that progressives should perceive the connections among media, policy, and culture beyond the limits of "politics" and "news". With sustained analyses of groundbreaking contemporary examples of what has become known as "convergence culture," Ted Gournelos brings together a wide range of media without sacrificing depth. His examples, such as South Park, The Simpsons, The Onion, The Daily Show, Chappelle's show and The Boondocks, are chosen for their political scope and social impact and demonstrate the ways in which what we know as "politics" is rapidly changing. The book's forays into established fields like feminist, race, and queer theory are combined with perspectives drawn from political economy and rhetoric to demonstrate the power of irony, humor, and cultural dissonance in modern approaches to dissonant cultural politics.

Shaping the Future of African American Film

Color-Coded Economics and the Story Behind the Numbers

Author: Monica White Ndounou

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813573122

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 9430

In Hollywood, we hear, it’s all about the money. It’s a ready explanation for why so few black films get made—no crossover appeal, no promise of a big payoff. But what if the money itself is color-coded? What if the economics that governs film production is so skewed that no film by, about, or for people of color will ever look like a worthy investment unless it follows specific racial or gender patterns? This, Monica Ndounou shows us, is precisely the case. In a work as revealing about the culture of filmmaking as it is about the distorted economics of African American film, Ndounou clearly traces the insidious connections between history, content, and cash in black films. How does history come into it? Hollywood’s reliance on past performance as a measure of potential success virtually guarantees that historically underrepresented, underfunded, and undersold African American films devalue the future prospects of black films. So the cycle continues as it has for nearly a century. Behind the scenes, the numbers are far from neutral. Analyzing the onscreen narratives and off-screen circumstances behind nearly two thousand films featuring African Americans in leading and supporting roles, including such recent productions as Bamboozled, Beloved, and Tyler Perry’s Diary of a Mad Black Woman, Ndounou exposes the cultural and racial constraints that limit not just the production but also the expression and creative freedom of black films. Her wide-ranging analysis reaches into questions of literature, language, speech and dialect, film images and narrative, acting, theater and film business practices, production history and financing, and organizational history. By uncovering the ideology behind profit-driven industry practices that reshape narratives by, about, and for people of color, this provocative work brings to light existing limitations—and possibilities for reworking stories and business practices in theater, literature, and film.

The future of prejudice

psychoanalysis and the prevention of prejudice

Author: Henri Parens

Publisher: Jason Aronson Inc

ISBN: 9780765704603

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 325

View: 7567

Established psychoanalytic/psychodynamic researchers and theorists bring the exploration of prejudice to a new level by examining how psychoanalysis might elucidate strategies that will eliminate prejudice.

Warum ich nicht länger mit Weißen über Hautfarbe spreche

Author: Reni Eddo-Lodge

Publisher: Klett-Cotta

ISBN: 360811534X

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 7421

Viel zu lange wurde Rassismus als reines Problem rechter Extremisten definiert. Doch die subtileren, nicht weniger gefährlichen Vorurteile finden sich dort, wo man am wenigsten mit ihnen rechnen würde – im Herzen der achtbaren Gesellschaft. Was bedeutet es, in einer Welt, in der Weißsein als die selbstverständliche Norm gilt, nicht weiß zu sein? Reni Eddo-Lodge spürt den historischen Wurzeln der Vorurteile nach, und zeigt unmissverständlich, dass die Ungleichbehandlung Weißer und Nicht-Weißer unseren Systemen seit Generationen eingeschrieben ist. Ob in Politik oder Popkultur – nicht nur in der europaweiten Angst vor Immigration, sondern auch in aufwogenden Protestwellen gegen eine schwarze Hermine oder einen dunkelhäutigen Stormtrooper wird klar: Diskriminierende Tendenzen werden nicht nur von offenen Rassisten, sondern auch von vermeintlich toleranten Menschen praktiziert. Um die Ungerechtigkeiten des strukturellen Rassismus herauszustellen und zu bekämpfen, müssen darum People of Color und Weiße gleichermaßen aktiv werden – »Es gibt keine Gerechtigkeit, es gibt nur uns.«

Back to the Future of the Body

Author: Dominic Janes

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 1443846309

Category: Social Science

Page: 285

View: 2030

What can the past tell us about the future(s) of the body? The origins of this collection of papers lie in the work of the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities which has been involved in presenting a series of international workshops and conferences on the theme of the cultural life of the body. The rationale for these events was that, in concepts as diverse as the cyborg, the questioning of mind/body dualism, the contemporary image of the suicide bomber and the patenting of human genes, we can identify ways in which the future of the human body is at stake. This volume represents an attempt, not so much to speculate about what might happen, but to develop strategies for bodily empowerment so as to get “back to the future of the body”. The body, it is contended, is not to be thought of as an “object” or a “sign” but as an active participant in the shaping of cultural formations. And this is emphatically not an exercise in digging corpses out of the historical archive. The question is, rather, what can past lived and thought experiences of the body tell us about what the body can be(come)? “The continuing vitality of debate around the body was proven by the range and depth of the papers presented at the workshop on which this volume is based, ‘does the body have a future?’ Our overall theme required contributors to think through embodiment in the past. This they did with considerable interdisciplinary vigour, rigorousness and imagination.” Prof. Donna Dickenson, Director, Birkbeck Institute of the Humanities

The Future of Postcolonial Studies

Author: Chantal Zabus

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134690010

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 277

View: 2857

The Future of Postcolonial Studies celebrates the twenty-fifth anniversary of the publication of The Empire Writes Back by the now famous troika - Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffiths and Helen Tiffin. When The Empire Writes Back first appeared in 1989, it put postcolonial cultures and their post-invasion narratives on the map. This vibrant collection of fifteen chapters by both established and emerging scholars taps into this early mapping while merging these concerns with present trends which have been grouped as: comparing, converting, greening, post-queering and utopia. The postcolonial is a centrifugal force that continues to energize globalization, transnational, diaspora, area and queer studies. Spanning the colonial period from the 1860s to the present, The Future of Postcolonial Studies ventures into other postcolonies outside of the Anglophone purview. In reassessing the nation-state, language, race, religion, sexuality, the environment, and the very idea of 'the future,' this volume reasserts the notion that postcolonial is an "anticipatory discourse" and bears testimony to the driving energy and thus the future of postcolonial studies.

The Future of Educational Studies

Author: George W. Noblit,Beth Hatt-Echeverria

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated

ISBN: 9780820457994

Category: Education

Page: 334

View: 6754

This book represents a millennial point of reflection in the history of educational studies and its future. The trajectory of educational studies is especially interesting due to shifts that have occurred concerning knowledge and identity--particularly how they encounter one another. The chapters are largely drawn from presentations made at the American Educational Studies Association. They reflect educational studies - on the ground as practiced by members in the field and represent the future of educational studies--the redefinition of disciplines, the link between ideas and practice, and a critique of the assumptions within taken-for-granted knowledge. The Future of Educational Studies provides an excellent overview of educational studies and current examples of the range of work being done in the field."

The Heart of Whiteness

Normal Sexuality and Race in America, 1880–1940

Author: Julian B Carter

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822339489

Category: Social Science

Page: 219

View: 2652

In this groundbreaking study, Julian Carter demonstrates that between 1880 and 1940, cultural discourses of whiteness and heterosexuality fused to form a new concept of the "normal" American. Gilded Age elites defined white civilization as the triumphant achievement of exceptional people hewing to a relational ethic of strict self-discipline for the common good. During the early twentieth century, that racial and relational ideal was reconceived in more inclusive terms as "normality," something toward which everyone should strive. The appearance of inclusiveness helped make "normality" appear consistent with the self-image of a racially diverse republic; nonetheless, "normality" was gauged largely in terms of adherence to erotic and emotional conventions that gained cultural significance through their association with arguments for the legitimacy of white political and social dominance. At the same time, the affectionate, reproductive heterosexuality of "normal" married couples became increasingly central to legitimate membership in the nation. Carter builds her intricate argument from detailed readings of an array of popular texts, focusing on how sex education for children and marital advice for adults provided significant venues for the dissemination of the new ideal of normality. She concludes that because its overt concerns were love, marriage, and babies, normality discourse facilitated white evasiveness about racial inequality. The ostensible focus of "normality" on matters of sexuality provided a superficially race-neutral conceptual structure that whites could and did use to evade engagement with the unequal relations of power that continue to shape American life today.

Rampage Violence Narratives

What Fictional Accounts of School Shootings Say about the Future of America’s Youth

Author: Kathryn E. Linder

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739187511

Category: Social Science

Page: 168

View: 8622

This book is the first to explore the significance of more than twenty-five fictional depictions of rampage violence in film, television, adult literature, and young adult literature. Exploring these texts with an analysis grounded in feminist cultural studies unveils the ways in which fictional rampage violence narratives, in context with their urban violence counterparts, communicate adult anxieties about American youth and who represents the “ideal” citizen.

Living Alterities

Phenomenology, Embodiment, and Race

Author: Emily S. Lee

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438450176

Category: Philosophy

Page: 300

View: 1618

Philosophers consider race and racism from the perspective of lived, bodily experience. Broadening the philosophical conversation about race and racism, Living Alterities considers how people’s racial embodiment affects their day-to-day lived experiences, the lived experiences of individuals marked by race interacting with and responding to others marked by race, and the tensions that arise between different spheres of a single person’s identity. Drawing on phenomenology and the work of thinkers such as Frantz Fanon, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and Iris Marion Young, the essays address the embodiment experiences of African Americans, Muslims, Asian Americans, Latinas, Jews, and white Americans. The volume’s focus on specific situations, temporalities, and encounters provides important context for understanding how race operates in people’s lives in ordinary settings like classrooms, dorm rooms, borderlands, elevators, and families.

Retheorizing Race and Whiteness in the 21st Century

Changes and Challenges

Author: Charles A. Gallagher,France Winddance Twine

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317984625

Category: Social Science

Page: 188

View: 4189

Retheorizing Race and Whiteness in the 21st Century examines the role whiteness and white identities play in framing and reworking racial categories, hierarchies and boundaries within the context of nation, class, gender and immigration. It takes as its theoretical starting point the understanding that whiteness is not, and nor has it ever been, a static uniform category of social identification. The scholarship in this book uses new empirical studies to show whiteness as a multiplicity of identities that are historically grounded, class specific, politically manipulated and gendered social relations that inhabit local custom and national sentiment. Contributors to this book examine a wide range of issues, yet all chapters are linked by one common denominator: they examine how power and oppression are articulated, redefined and asserted through various political discourses and cultural practices that privilege whiteness even when the prerogatives of the dominant group are contested. Retheorizing Race and Whiteness in the 21st Century is an important new contribution to the study of whiteness for academics, researchers, and advanced students of Ethnic Studies, Sociology, Political Science, and Ethnography. This book was originally published as a special issue of Ethnic and Racial Studies.

The future of class in history

what's left of the social?

Author: Geoff Eley,Keith Nield

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 7007

Unifying concepts are essential when studying history. They provide students and scholars with ways to organize their thoughts, research, and writings. However, these concepts are also the focus of myriad conflicts within the field. Social history has experienced more than its share of such conflicts since its inception some forty years ago. In recent times the fields of “the social” and of “culture” have sometimes been presented as mutually exclusive and even hostile. Once again, conceptual innovation in history has been cast as a closure by which the new drives out the old: in this case, cultural history radically displacing social history. The Future of Class in History analyzes the effect of the conflict that followed the “turn to culture” in historical work by examining the use of class and demonstrates how practitioners in multiple fields can collaborate to produce the highest quality scholarship. “Offers new ways of thinking about ‘class’ and ‘society’ in a world in which such categories have been radically called into question.” —Sherry Ortner, University of California, Los Angeles “Brilliantly charts social history’s past achievement, present dilemma, and future promise in a work distinguished by intellectual openness and generosity.” —James A. Epstein, Vanderbilt University “Eley and Nield seek to rescue the deluded follower of social history from the enormous condescension of the cultural turn. They succeed admirably, making the case for a new hybrid socio-cultural history.” —Donald Reid, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill “This terrific double act has once again produced a text that demands to be read by all those tired of the juxtaposition of social and cultural histories and still interested in the problematic of class and the politics of its past and present.” —James Vernon, University of California, Berkeley “Eley and Nield tackle a contentious debate with a gracious plea for collaboration. Their strong desire to get past the ‘culture wars’ and to engage social and cultural historians in fruitful dialogue is a welcome move, stylishly executed.” —Philippa Levine, University of Southern California Geoff Eley is Professor of History at the University of Michigan. Keith Nield is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Hull.

White Identity Politics

Author: Ashley Jardina

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108475523

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 3021

Amidst discontent over diversity, racial identity is a lens through which many US white Americans now view the political world.

White Out

The Continuing Significance of Racism

Author: Ashley W. Doane,Eduardo Bonilla-Silva

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136064664

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 6753

What does it mean to be white? This remains the question at large in the continued effort to examine how white racial identity is constructed and how systems of white privilege operate in everyday life. White Out brings together the original work of leading scholars across the disciplines of sociology, philosophy, history, and anthropology to give readers an important and cutting-edge study of "whiteness".