The Colors of Zion

Author: George Bornstein

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674057015

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 3652

This comparative study focuses on three groups often seen as antagonistic—Blacks, Jews, and Irish. Resolutely aware of past tensions, Bornstein argues that the pendulum has swung too far in that direction and that it is time to recover the history of lost connections and cooperation among the groups. The chronological range stretches from Frederick Douglass’s tour of Ireland during the Great Famine of the 1840s through the 1940s with the catastrophe of World War II. The study ends with the concept of the Righteous Gentile commemorated at the Israeli Holocaust Memorial, Yad Vashem--non-Jews who during the Holocaust risked their own lives to rescue Jews from the horror of the Holocaust. Bornstein expands the term here to include all those Irish, Jewish, or African American figures who fought against narrow identification only with their own group and instead championed a wider and more humane vision of a shared humanity that sees hybridity rather than purity and love rather than resentment. The identity politics and culture wars of recent decades often made recognizing those positive qualities problematic. But with the election of a mixed-race president who himself embodies mixture and mutual respect (and who famously described himself as a “mutt”), the shallow and arbitrary nature of narrow identity politics become evident. This study recuperates strong voices from the past of all three groups in order to let them speak for themselves.

The Question of Zion

Author: Jacqueline Rose

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400826527

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 8261

Zionism was inspired as a movement--one driven by the search for a homeland for the stateless and persecuted Jewish people. Yet it trampled the rights of the Arabs in Palestine. Today it has become so controversial that it defies understanding and trumps reasoned public debate. So argues prominent British writer Jacqueline Rose, who uses her political and psychoanalytic skills in this book to take an unprecedented look at Zionism--one of the most powerful ideologies of modern times. Rose enters the inner world of the movement and asks a new set of questions. How did Zionism take shape as an identity? And why does it seem so immutable? Analyzing the messianic fervor of Zionism, she argues that it colors Israel's most profound self-image to this day. Rose also explores the message of dissidents, who, while believing themselves the true Zionists, warned at the outset against the dangers of statehood for the Jewish people. She suggests that these dissidents were prescient in their recognition of the legitimate claims of the Palestinian Arabs. In fact, she writes, their thinking holds the knowledge the Jewish state needs today in order to transform itself. In perhaps the most provocative part of her analysis, Rose proposes that the link between the Holocaust and the founding of the Jewish state, so often used to justify Israel's policies, needs to be rethought in terms of the shame felt by the first leaders of the nation toward their own European history. For anyone concerned with the conflict in Israel-Palestine, this timely book offers a unique understanding of Zionism as an unavoidable psychic and historical force.

The Colors of Courage

Gettysburg's Forgotten History: Immigrants, Women, and African Americans in the Civil War's Defining

Author: Margaret S. Creighton

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0786722061

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 6002

In the summer of 1863, as Union and Confederate armies converged on southern Pennsylvania, the town of Gettysburg found itself thrust onto the center stage of war. The three days of fighting that ensued decisively turned the tide of the Civil War. In The Colors of Courage, Margaret Creighton narrates the tale of this crucial battle from the viewpoint of three unsung groups--women, immigrants, and African Americans--and reveals how wide the conflict's dimensions were. A historian with a superb flair for storytelling, Creighton draws on memoirs, letters, diaries, and newspapers to bring to life the individuals at the heart of her narrative. The Colors of Courage is a stunningly fluid work of original history-one that redefines the Civil War's most remarkable battle.

Cengage Advantage Books: Essentials of Business Law

Author: Jeffrey F. Beatty,Susan S. Samuelson

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1285974417

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 1024

View: 7469

No other text conveys such a passion for this profoundly important discipline. Delivering the material in their signature engaging style, the authors pepper their writing with a focus on human conflict that illustrates legal issues from the business manager's perspective. While more brief than traditional business law texts, ESSENTIALS OF BUSINESS LAW, 5TH Edition provides solid coverage of the core topics, especially contracts. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Fall Colors Across North America

Author: Anthony E. Cook,Ann Zwinger,Art Wolfe

Publisher: Graphic Arts Center Publishing

ISBN: 9781558685994

Category: Photography

Page: 128

View: 8641

Through the inspiring photography of Anthony E. Cook and the evocative writing of naturalist Ann Zwinger, this colorful volume takes readers on a magnificent tour of autumn's multicolored tapestry. 110 color photos.

Zion National Park: Impressions

Author: James Randklev,Tom Till,Lyman Hafen,Greer K. Chesher

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781560374312

Category: Photography

Page: 80

View: 6233

In each glorious season, Randklev and Till capture Zion's many striking features, from the meandering Virgin River to the stately Watchman. Zion's majestic land forms and surreal colors come to life on the pages of Zion National Park Impressions.Lyman Hafen's sensitive foreword details the history – and magic – of this unique national park, “In this day and age we are bombarded by color images in such proliferation it is easy to become complacent to their beauty. But as James Randklev and Tom Till have proven in the pages of this book, the utter magnificence of Zion National Park can still stop you in your tracks and cause you to wonder if such a place truly exists.” Greer K. Chesher's captions will give readers a deeper understanding of the geology and history behind this remarkable land.

That Pride of Race and Character

The Roots of Jewish Benevolence in the Jim Crow South

Author: Caroline E. Light

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479835773

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 4430

“It has ever been the boast of the Jewish people, that they support their own poor,” declared Kentucky attorney Benjamin Franklin Jonas in 1856. “Their reasons are partly founded in religious necessity, and partly in that pride of race and character which has supported them through so many ages of trial and vicissitude.” In That Pride of Race and Character, Caroline E. Light examines the American Jewish tradition of benevolence and charity and explores its southern roots. Light provides a critical analysis of benevolence as it was inflected by regional ideals of race and gender, showing how a southern Jewish benevolent empire emerged in response to the combined pressures of post-Civil War devastation and the simultaneous influx of eastern European immigration. In an effort to combat the voices of anti-Semitism and nativism, established Jewish leaders developed a sophisticated and cutting-edge network of charities in the South to ensure that Jews took care of those considered “their own” while also proving themselves to be exemplary white citizens. Drawing from confidential case files and institutional records from various southern Jewish charities, the book relates how southern Jewish leaders and their immigrant clients negotiated the complexities of “fitting in” in a place and time of significant socio-political turbulence. Ultimately, the southern Jewish call to benevolence bore the particular imprint of the region’s racial mores and left behind a rich legacy.

Visions of Zion

Ethiopians and Rastafari in the Search for the Promised Land

Author: Erin C. MacLeod

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479880752

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 2999

In reggae song after reggae song Bob Marley and other reggae singers speak of the Promised Land of Ethiopia. “Repatriation is a must!” they cry. The Rastafari have been travelling to Ethiopia since the movement originated in Jamaica in 1930s. They consider it the Promised Land, and repatriation is a cornerstone of their faith. Though Ethiopians see Rastafari as immigrants, the Rastafari see themselves as returning members of the Ethiopian diaspora. In Visions of Zion, Erin C. MacLeod offers the first in-depth investigation into how Ethiopians perceive Rastafari and Rastafarians within Ethiopia and the role this unique immigrant community plays within Ethiopian society. Rastafari are unusual among migrants, basing their movements on spiritual rather than economic choices. This volume offers those who study the movement a broader understanding of the implications of repatriation. Taking the Ethiopian perspective into account, it argues that migrant and diaspora identities are the products of negotiation, and it illuminates the implications of this negotiation for concepts of citizenship, as well as for our understandings of pan-Africanism and south-south migration. Providing a rare look at migration to a non-Western country, this volume also fills a gap in the broader immigration studies literature.

Southern Cultures

Volume 18: Number 1 – Spring 2012 Issue

Author: Harry L. Watson,Jocelyn Neal

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807837628

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 3668

In the Spring 2012 issue of Southern Cultures… Blood rains. Snow falls. Bourbon makes the man. Irish Americans redefine black and white. Camp Wah-Kon-Dah glows in the embers of old memories. The great teacher Arthur Raper opens minds, hearts, and doors. And the creative spaces of geniuses await the next act. Table of Contents Front Porch by Harry L. Watson "What happens to frontier manhood when blacks, women, and gays drink bourbon too—and white fraternity boys get stuck with Smirnoff Ice from time to time?" Every Ounce a Man's Whiskey?: Bourbon in the White Masculine South by Sean S. McKeithan "The hot bite of the Bourbon sensuously connects the body of the drinker to nation, region, and locale, enjoining his experience with those of imagined, historical bodies, soaking up space and place in the slow burn of what appears an endless southern summertime." Native Ground: Photographs by Rob McDonald "If convention has it right, these are writers who bear something close to a genetic predisposition to produce a literature suffused with place." Turned Inside Out: Black, White, and Irish in the South by Bryan Giemza "As a place where Black and Green were in perpetual contact, the Atlantic South furnishes an ideal case study in how these peoples moved with, against, and around one another." "God First, You Second, Me Third": An Exploration of "Quiet Jewishness"at Camp Wah- Kon- Dah by Marcie Cohen Ferris "This was an anxious time for American Jews, stung by the anti- Semitic quotas and discrimination of the interwar years and the growing horror regarding the fate of European Jewry as the Holocaust came to light in the 1940s." "A Mind- Opening Influence of Great Importance": Arthur Raper at Agnes Scott College by Clifford M. Kuhn "He was such an eye- opener to me . . . such a reversal of the whole way you think about life and society." "For the Scrutiny of Science and the Light of Revelation": American Blood Falls by Tom Maxwell "Showers of blood, however dreadful, were not news. Pliny, Cicero, Livy, and Plutarch mentioned rains of blood and flesh. Zeus makes it rain blood, 'as a portent of slaughter,' in Homer's Iliad." Mason- Dixon Lines Bourbon Poetry by R. T. Smith ". . . Earl was a steady liar who never in his life solved a single crime, to hear my father tell it, an improvident soul prone to nocturnal misdemeanors himself . . ." Southern Snow by Nancy Hatch Woodward "There's a silence in a snowy dawn that forces you to look anew at what has been transformed from the customary landscape of your day- to- day life. Dogwoods glisten in their silver finery; bowing fir limbs form a secret cathedral." Southern Cultures is published quarterly (spring, summer, fall, winter) by the University of North Carolina Press. The journal is sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Center for the Study of the American South.

Censoring Racial Ridicule

Irish, Jewish, and African American Struggles over Race and Representation, 1890-1930

Author: M. Alison Kibler

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469618370

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 9851

A drunken Irish maid slips and falls. A greedy Jewish pawnbroker lures his female employee into prostitution. An African American man leers at a white woman. These and other, similar images appeared widely on stages and screens across America during the early twentieth century. In this provocative study, M. Alison Kibler uncovers, for the first time, powerful and concurrent campaigns by Irish, Jewish and African Americans against racial ridicule in popular culture at the turn of the twentieth century. Censoring Racial Ridicule explores how Irish, Jewish, and African American groups of the era resisted harmful representations in popular culture by lobbying behind the scenes, boycotting particular acts, and staging theater riots. Kibler demonstrates that these groups' tactics evolved and diverged over time, with some continuing to pursue street protest while others sought redress through new censorship laws. Exploring the relationship between free expression, democracy, and equality in America, Kibler shows that the Irish, Jewish, and African American campaigns against racial ridicule are at the roots of contemporary debates over hate speech.

Scenic Driving Utah

Author: Christy Karras

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0762769467

Category: Travel

Page: 288

View: 3053

Discover Utah with over 25 recommended drives. Scenic Driving Utah provides indispensable information, including directions and a map for each itinerary, in-depth descriptions of attractions and points of interest, travel tips, and more. In addition to the text being fully revised and updated, the 3rd edition features a new cover treatment.

A Book of Mormons

Latter-Day Saints on a Modern-Day Zion

Author: Emily W. Jensen,Tracy McKay-Lamb

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781935952909

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 6538

A Book of Mormons not only provides a fascinating glimpse into a religion that has taken center stage in the last presidential election, but will prompt insights into what living an encompassing religion means both individually and for the community trying to understand exactly "What does it mean to be a Mormon today?" Mormonism is at a crossroads, having been under the microscopic lens of the media for the past five years, even as Mormons young and old grapple with the openness and accessibility of The Information Age. Both the institutional church and its lay members are working to better define the faith for outsiders as well as within. This collection of essays from a broad swath of Mormons -- some who live their faith quietly, others who wrestle with how it colors their professional endeavors -- is an attempt to broaden perspectives about Mormons and demystifying stereotypes.

Harry the Dirty Dog Board Book

Author: Gene Zion

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 006084244X

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 34

View: 5111

Harry is a white dog with black spots who hates to take a bath. One day he gets so dirty he has black fur with white spots! Where's Harry?

Songs of Zion

The African Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States and South Africa

Author: James T. Campbell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195360052

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 7101

This is a study of the transplantation of a creed devised by and for African Americans--the African Methodist Episcopal Church--that was appropriated and transformed in a variety of South African contexts. Focusing on a transatlantic institution like the African Methodist Episcopal Church, the book studies the complex human and intellectual traffic that has bound African American and South African experience. It explores the development and growth of the African Methodist Episcopal Church both in South Africa and America, and the interaction between the two churches. This is a highly innovative work of comparative and religious history. Its linking of the United States and African black religious experiences is unique and makes it appealing to readers interested in religious history and black experience in both the United States and South Africa.