The Colors of Zion

Author: George Bornstein

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674059204

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 4117

This comparative study focuses on three groups often seen as antagonistic—Blacks, Jews, and Irish. Resolutely aware of past tensions, Bornstein argues that the pendulum has swung too far in that direction and that it is time to recover the history of lost connections and cooperation among the groups. The chronological range stretches from Frederick Douglass’s tour of Ireland during the Great Famine of the 1840s through the 1940s with the catastrophe of World War II. The study ends with the concept of the Righteous Gentile commemorated at the Israeli Holocaust Memorial, Yad Vashem--non-Jews who during the Holocaust risked their own lives to rescue Jews from the horror of the Holocaust. Bornstein expands the term here to include all those Irish, Jewish, or African American figures who fought against narrow identification only with their own group and instead championed a wider and more humane vision of a shared humanity that sees hybridity rather than purity and love rather than resentment. The identity politics and culture wars of recent decades often made recognizing those positive qualities problematic. But with the election of a mixed-race president who himself embodies mixture and mutual respect (and who famously described himself as a “mutt”), the shallow and arbitrary nature of narrow identity politics become evident. This study recuperates strong voices from the past of all three groups in order to let them speak for themselves.

The Colors of Courage

Gettysburg's Forgotten History: Immigrants, Women, and African Americans in the Civil War's Defining

Author: Margaret S. Creighton

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0786722061

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 4042

In the summer of 1863, as Union and Confederate armies converged on southern Pennsylvania, the town of Gettysburg found itself thrust onto the center stage of war. The three days of fighting that ensued decisively turned the tide of the Civil War. In The Colors of Courage, Margaret Creighton narrates the tale of this crucial battle from the viewpoint of three unsung groups--women, immigrants, and African Americans--and reveals how wide the conflict's dimensions were. A historian with a superb flair for storytelling, Creighton draws on memoirs, letters, diaries, and newspapers to bring to life the individuals at the heart of her narrative. The Colors of Courage is a stunningly fluid work of original history-one that redefines the Civil War's most remarkable battle.

Zion National Park

Bryce Canyon, Cedar Breaks, Kaibab Forest, North Rim of Grand Canyon (Illustrations)

Author: Various

Publisher: W. H. Murray GENERAL PASSENGER AGENT Union Pacific System OMAHA, NEB.

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 63

View: 4506

Example in this ebook The Land of Flaming Canyons and Jeweled Amphitheatres Touched by a light that hath no name, A glory never sung, Aloft on sky and mountain wall, Are God’s great pictures hung. —Whittier Southward from the thirty-eighth parallel of latitude the surface of Western Utah descends in magnificent “Cyclopean steps” from the flattened summits of the Wasatch Mountains, 11,000 feet high, to 3,000 feet at the Rio Virgen, then ascends gently in Arizona to the colossal arch of the Kaibab Plateau, 9,000 feet in elevation and overlooking the Grand Canyon. These Titanic terraces and palisaded plateaus, more particularly the flaming canyons and jeweled amphitheatres cut from their color-saturated rock layers, form scenic spectacles without peer or rival on the globe. Nothing else is comparable to these wonderlands. To see them is both a thrilling adventure and an artistic delight. Measured by civilization’s yardstick, the unknown land in which they lie is a frontier, still in the pioneer stage of existence. It is not so long since the forts along the way actually repelled Indian attacks; it is not so far to fastnesses where cougars come forth to prey on deer, or to desert valleys where wild mustangs range. On the edge of the plains are ruins of primitive dwellings of which the modern Indian knows nothing; in many a secluded canyon are the more inscrutable habitations of the cliff dwellers. The indomitable ranchers have built quaint, poplar-shaded villages with homes of adobe, and their farms are often fenced with stone. It is a mysterious land of purple sage and empurpled distances, of incredible color, of sun-magic and the wizardry of wind and water. It is a place to drink in beauty, to form new conceptions of the divine. Geologists recognize three subdivisions of the region from north to south: the High Plateaus; the Terraced Plateaus; the Grand Canyon Platform. From Cedar Breaks on the High Plateau it is more than 100 miles to Bright Angel Point on Grand Canyon’s rim; from Hurricane Ledge on the west, eastward to the Colorado River is more than 100 miles. The country reveals fascinating chapters of geologic history. It is a region that has undergone great transitions, alternately sea bottom and mountain top; a region broken and tilted by tremendous displacements; a region scorched and branded by intense volcanic action; but more than all else, from the viewpoint of human interest, a region profoundly sculptured and given its most distinctive character by the beauty-creating genius of erosion. From Cedar Breaks, cut into mountains 11,000 feet high, the vision has a sweep of 100 miles, and the vast terraces may be seen thrust out to the south like promontories into the sea. Where one succeeds another, the uppermost presents sinuous cliff walls, hundreds of miles in length and superbly distinctive in color and carving. More than 10,000 feet of strata are exposed, “a library of the ages in vivid bindings” that contains the fossil remains of creatures since the morning of life on earth. Each step down indicates the removal, by streams, rain, frost and wind, of all the rock-layers above it. From the Grand Canyon Platform, these 10,000 feet of strata have been completely swept away. To be continue in this ebook

That Pride of Race and Character

The Roots of Jewish Benevolence in the Jim Crow South

Author: Caroline E. Light

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479835773

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 456

“It has ever been the boast of the Jewish people, that they support their own poor,” declared Kentucky attorney Benjamin Franklin Jonas in 1856. “Their reasons are partly founded in religious necessity, and partly in that pride of race and character which has supported them through so many ages of trial and vicissitude.” In That Pride of Race and Character, Caroline E. Light examines the American Jewish tradition of benevolence and charity and explores its southern roots. Light provides a critical analysis of benevolence as it was inflected by regional ideals of race and gender, showing how a southern Jewish benevolent empire emerged in response to the combined pressures of post-Civil War devastation and the simultaneous influx of eastern European immigration. In an effort to combat the voices of anti-Semitism and nativism, established Jewish leaders developed a sophisticated and cutting-edge network of charities in the South to ensure that Jews took care of those considered “their own” while also proving themselves to be exemplary white citizens. Drawing from confidential case files and institutional records from various southern Jewish charities, the book relates how southern Jewish leaders and their immigrant clients negotiated the complexities of “fitting in” in a place and time of significant socio-political turbulence. Ultimately, the southern Jewish call to benevolence bore the particular imprint of the region’s racial mores and left behind a rich legacy.

Censoring Racial Ridicule

Irish, Jewish, and African American Struggles over Race and Representation, 1890-1930

Author: M. Alison Kibler

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469618370

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 9296

A drunken Irish maid slips and falls. A greedy Jewish pawnbroker lures his female employee into prostitution. An African American man leers at a white woman. These and other, similar images appeared widely on stages and screens across America during the early twentieth century. In this provocative study, M. Alison Kibler uncovers, for the first time, powerful and concurrent campaigns by Irish, Jewish and African Americans against racial ridicule in popular culture at the turn of the twentieth century. Censoring Racial Ridicule explores how Irish, Jewish, and African American groups of the era resisted harmful representations in popular culture by lobbying behind the scenes, boycotting particular acts, and staging theater riots. Kibler demonstrates that these groups' tactics evolved and diverged over time, with some continuing to pursue street protest while others sought redress through new censorship laws. Exploring the relationship between free expression, democracy, and equality in America, Kibler shows that the Irish, Jewish, and African American campaigns against racial ridicule are at the roots of contemporary debates over hate speech.

Southern Cultures

Volume 18: Number 1 – Spring 2012 Issue

Author: Harry L. Watson,Jocelyn Neal

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807837628

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 5401

In the Spring 2012 issue of Southern Cultures… Blood rains. Snow falls. Bourbon makes the man. Irish Americans redefine black and white. Camp Wah-Kon-Dah glows in the embers of old memories. The great teacher Arthur Raper opens minds, hearts, and doors. And the creative spaces of geniuses await the next act. Table of Contents Front Porch by Harry L. Watson "What happens to frontier manhood when blacks, women, and gays drink bourbon too—and white fraternity boys get stuck with Smirnoff Ice from time to time?" Every Ounce a Man's Whiskey?: Bourbon in the White Masculine South by Sean S. McKeithan "The hot bite of the Bourbon sensuously connects the body of the drinker to nation, region, and locale, enjoining his experience with those of imagined, historical bodies, soaking up space and place in the slow burn of what appears an endless southern summertime." Native Ground: Photographs by Rob McDonald "If convention has it right, these are writers who bear something close to a genetic predisposition to produce a literature suffused with place." Turned Inside Out: Black, White, and Irish in the South by Bryan Giemza "As a place where Black and Green were in perpetual contact, the Atlantic South furnishes an ideal case study in how these peoples moved with, against, and around one another." "God First, You Second, Me Third": An Exploration of "Quiet Jewishness"at Camp Wah- Kon- Dah by Marcie Cohen Ferris "This was an anxious time for American Jews, stung by the anti- Semitic quotas and discrimination of the interwar years and the growing horror regarding the fate of European Jewry as the Holocaust came to light in the 1940s." "A Mind- Opening Influence of Great Importance": Arthur Raper at Agnes Scott College by Clifford M. Kuhn "He was such an eye- opener to me . . . such a reversal of the whole way you think about life and society." "For the Scrutiny of Science and the Light of Revelation": American Blood Falls by Tom Maxwell "Showers of blood, however dreadful, were not news. Pliny, Cicero, Livy, and Plutarch mentioned rains of blood and flesh. Zeus makes it rain blood, 'as a portent of slaughter,' in Homer's Iliad." Mason- Dixon Lines Bourbon Poetry by R. T. Smith ". . . Earl was a steady liar who never in his life solved a single crime, to hear my father tell it, an improvident soul prone to nocturnal misdemeanors himself . . ." Southern Snow by Nancy Hatch Woodward "There's a silence in a snowy dawn that forces you to look anew at what has been transformed from the customary landscape of your day- to- day life. Dogwoods glisten in their silver finery; bowing fir limbs form a secret cathedral." Southern Cultures is published quarterly (spring, summer, fall, winter) by the University of North Carolina Press. The journal is sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Center for the Study of the American South.

Visions of Zion

Ethiopians and Rastafari in the Search for the Promised Land

Author: Erin C. MacLeod

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479880752

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 2690

In reggae song after reggae song Bob Marley and other reggae singers speak of the Promised Land of Ethiopia. “Repatriation is a must!” they cry. The Rastafari have been travelling to Ethiopia since the movement originated in Jamaica in 1930s. They consider it the Promised Land, and repatriation is a cornerstone of their faith. Though Ethiopians see Rastafari as immigrants, the Rastafari see themselves as returning members of the Ethiopian diaspora. In Visions of Zion, Erin C. MacLeod offers the first in-depth investigation into how Ethiopians perceive Rastafari and Rastafarians within Ethiopia and the role this unique immigrant community plays within Ethiopian society. Rastafari are unusual among migrants, basing their movements on spiritual rather than economic choices. This volume offers those who study the movement a broader understanding of the implications of repatriation. Taking the Ethiopian perspective into account, it argues that migrant and diaspora identities are the products of negotiation, and it illuminates the implications of this negotiation for concepts of citizenship, as well as for our understandings of pan-Africanism and south-south migration. Providing a rare look at migration to a non-Western country, this volume also fills a gap in the broader immigration studies literature.

SOUL FLYING INTO MOUNT ZION

Forty minutes of Paradisiacal sightings

Author: Debra Yarbrough Roberts

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1499016891

Category: Religion

Page: 94

View: 1889

Prophetess Debra J. Yarbrough was prophesized to by her former Pastor that God was preparing her for translation. So there present in her Church were many eyewitnesses, when sudden death came She Departed Earth and Translated Home. It was revealed to Debra that she was not to fear death. There she was soul flying being escorted by two Angelic Angels, Michael and Gabriel. Michael the Arch Angel spoke fiercely fear not for we have been sent from the presence of God to escort you safely into heavenly frontiers... There prophetess, Debra, was dropped-off on Top of Mount Zion where she stood in the brightest of light, that shone out from the figurative inanimate holy Lamb. Why! She was saturated with liquid love pouring out of her very being. As they continued in joint venture strolling down into the grassy green meadows where she discovered paradisiacal sightings of splendor, and beauty, beyond any sense of an imagination. There she spent forty minutes observing many profound mysteries finally being unveiled. Then afterwards the guided tour finished. The holy lamb flew her swiftly away into the vast realms of the Universe... And there she was shown a worldwide ministry and a greater ingathering of harvest. Finally her departure came, flying back to the holy Mount. Surprisingly! The holy Lamb said,” Debra you must go back to earth. Then tears began falling from her eyelids like heavy rain drops. Her heart filled with disparity. The lamb’s passion quickly comforted.” My daughter you are given to know the mysteries of the kingdom. Therefore, the things that you have seen and heard write in a book. Tell my people that I love them and I have not forgotten them days without numbers. When you see all these events began culminating LOOK UP! My dissension is drawing near. My daughter, the greater cloud of witness have been waiting with great anticipation for this phenomenal event to finally take precedence. I am coming back for my Bride who has adorned herself in fine white linen unlike the spotted polka dots. But garments that have remained unspotted from this present day World. Halleluiah! Selah, ponder on these occurring events of time and be ready for soul shifting. Therefore, prepare for your heavenly father has kept it a guarded secret he only knows the hour of his Son Yahushua’s return.

Songs of Zion

The African Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States and South Africa

Author: James T. Campbell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195360052

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 7356

This is a study of the transplantation of a creed devised by and for African Americans--the African Methodist Episcopal Church--that was appropriated and transformed in a variety of South African contexts. Focusing on a transatlantic institution like the African Methodist Episcopal Church, the book studies the complex human and intellectual traffic that has bound African American and South African experience. It explores the development and growth of the African Methodist Episcopal Church both in South Africa and America, and the interaction between the two churches. This is a highly innovative work of comparative and religious history. Its linking of the United States and African black religious experiences is unique and makes it appealing to readers interested in religious history and black experience in both the United States and South Africa.

Expositions of the Psalms 121-150 (Vol. 5)

Author: Saint Augustine (of Hippo)

Publisher: New City Press

ISBN: 1565482107

Category: Religion

Page: 536

View: 1622

Sixth and final volume of the long-awaited translation of one of Augustine's classics and a great work in Christian literature. Newly translated by Maria Boulding, O.S.B., whose masterful translation of Augustine's Confessions in the same series has been praised as being "of a different level of excellence from practically anything else in the market" (Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams.) The Expositions recapitulate and focus the experiences of Augustine's personal life, his theological reflections, and his pastoral concerns as Bishop of Hippo.

The Morning Star

Author: J. R. Jones

Publisher: Tate Publishing

ISBN: 1616635207

Category: Fiction

Page: 300

View: 2563

The apocalypse has come and gone. The seals have been broken, the horns sounded, and the bowls emptied. God has passed judgment and created a new world for His faithful: Eterni. Settling the supervision of Zion in Archangel Mikael's loyal hands, God leaves with a third of the angelic hosts to create some other reality, universe, world, beings. A thousand years pass in harmonic serenity, but suddenly odd occurrences begin adding up, producing an uneasiness in heaven. An angel falls ill for the first time in eternity, sinister sightings appear on Eterni, and a new and unknowable prophecy is announced. What had begun as the age of peace is quickly becoming anything but; as unfolding events herald the return of the Morning Star.

Biographical Sketches and Sermons, of some of the first Ministers of the Associate Church in America. To which is prefixed a historical introduction, containing an account of the rise and progress of the Associate Church for the first half century of her existence in this country

Author: James P. MILLER (Past.),John ANDERSON (D.D., of Pennsylvania.)

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 7599


The Question of Zion

Author: Jacqueline Rose

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400826527

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 7335

Zionism was inspired as a movement--one driven by the search for a homeland for the stateless and persecuted Jewish people. Yet it trampled the rights of the Arabs in Palestine. Today it has become so controversial that it defies understanding and trumps reasoned public debate. So argues prominent British writer Jacqueline Rose, who uses her political and psychoanalytic skills in this book to take an unprecedented look at Zionism--one of the most powerful ideologies of modern times. Rose enters the inner world of the movement and asks a new set of questions. How did Zionism take shape as an identity? And why does it seem so immutable? Analyzing the messianic fervor of Zionism, she argues that it colors Israel's most profound self-image to this day. Rose also explores the message of dissidents, who, while believing themselves the true Zionists, warned at the outset against the dangers of statehood for the Jewish people. She suggests that these dissidents were prescient in their recognition of the legitimate claims of the Palestinian Arabs. In fact, she writes, their thinking holds the knowledge the Jewish state needs today in order to transform itself. In perhaps the most provocative part of her analysis, Rose proposes that the link between the Holocaust and the founding of the Jewish state, so often used to justify Israel's policies, needs to be rethought in terms of the shame felt by the first leaders of the nation toward their own European history. For anyone concerned with the conflict in Israel-Palestine, this timely book offers a unique understanding of Zionism as an unavoidable psychic and historical force.

Pictures of Zion

terrestrial and celestial

Author: Mark Gould

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Symbolism in the Bible

Page: 344

View: 9368


Touring the National Parks of the Southwest

Capitol Reef, Glen Canyon, Grand Canyon, Mesa Verde, Zion, Carlsbad Caverns, Big Bend

Author: Larry Ludmer

Publisher: Hunter Publishing, Inc

ISBN: 1588437566

Category: Travel

Page: 200

View: 8468

Based on the 506-page full guide to the great American national parks, how to avoid the crowds, walking tours, facilities and how to get there, this edition focuses on the major parks of the Southwest: Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, Arizona, Utah & Nevada.

A Century of Sanctuary

The Art of Zion National Park

Author: N.A

Publisher: Zion Natural History Assn

ISBN: 9780915630486

Category: History

Page: 131

View: 1928

"A compilation of historic and contemporary art of Zion National Park with essays discussing the importance of art in the establishment of the park and how the park has been interpreted in art during its 100 years of existence"--Provided by publisher.