On Social Structure and Science

Author: Robert K. Merton

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226520704

Category: Science

Page: 386

View: 5876

Robert K. Merton is unarguably one of the most influential sociologists of his time. A figure whose wide-ranging theoretical and methodological contributions have become fundamental to the field, Merton is best known for introducing such concepts and procedures as unanticipated consequences, self-fulfilling prophecies, focused group interviews, middle-range theory, opportunity structure, and analytic paradigms. This definitive compilation encompasses the breadth and brilliance of his works, from the earliest to the most recent. Merton's foundational writings on social structure and process, on the sociology of science and knowledge, and on the discipline and trajectory of sociology itself are all powerfully represented, as are his autobiographical insights in a fascinating coda. Anchored by Piotr Sztompka's contextualizing introduction, Merton's vast oeuvre emerges as a dynamic and profoundly coherent system of thought, a constant source of vitality and renewal for present and future sociology.

The City

Author: Robert E. Park,Ernest W. Burgess,Roderick Duncan McKenzie

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226646114

Category: Social Science

Page: 239

View: 5731

The City, first published in 1925 and reprinted here in its entirety, is a cross-section of concerns of the Chicago urban school during the period of its most intense activity. Park and Burgess realized that ecological and economic factors were converted into a social organization by the traditions and aspirations of city dwellers. In their efforts to achieve objectivity, these sociologists never lost sight of the values that propel human beings. "It is a classic which remains relevant largely because it poses questions still unresolved."—Choice

The Chicago School of Sociology

Institutionalization, Diversity, and the Rise of Sociological Research

Author: Martin Bulmer

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226080055

Category: Social Science

Page: 285

View: 4995

From 1915 to 1935 the inventive community of social scientists at the University of Chicago pioneered empirical research and a variety of qualitative and quantitative methods, shaping the future of twentieth-century American sociology and related fields as well. Martin Bulmer's history of the Chicago school of sociology describes the university's role in creating research-based and publication-oriented graduate schools of social science. "This is an important piece of work on the history of sociology, but it is more than merely historical: Martin Bulmer's undertaking is also to explain why historical events occurred as they did, using potentially general theoretical ideas. He has studied what he sees as the period, from 1915 to 1935, when the 'Chicago School' most flourished, and defines the nature of its achievements and what made them possible . . . It is likely to become the indispensible historical source for its topic."—Jennifer Platt, Sociology

Criminological Perspectives on Race and Crime

Author: Shaun L. Gabbidon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113516049X

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 2802

Ideal for use in either crime theory or race and crime courses, this is the only text to look at the array of explanations for crime as they relate to racial and ethnic groups. Each chapter begins with a historical review of each theoretical perspective and how its original formulation and more recent derivatives account for racial/ethnic differences. The theoretical perspectives include those based on religion, biology, social disorganization/strain, subculture, labeling, conflict, social control, colonial, and feminism. This new Second Edition includes discussions of "Deadly Symbiosis," critical race theory/criminology, comparative conflict theory, maximization, and abortion, race, and crime. In the closing chapter, the author considers which perspectives have shown the most promise in the area of race/ethnicity and crime.

Street Kids

Homeless Youth, Outreach, and Policing New York’s Streets

Author: Kristina E. Gibson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814732275

Category: Social Science

Page: 247

View: 1149

Street outreach workers comb public places such as parks, vacant lots, and abandoned waterfronts to search for young people who are living out in public spaces, if not always in the public eye. Street Kids opens a window to the largely hidden world of street youth, drawing on their detailed and compelling narratives to give new insight into the experiences of youth homelessness and youth outreach. Kristina Gibson argues that the enforcement of quality of life ordinances in New York City has spurred hyper-mobility amongst the city’s street youth population and has serious implications for social work with homeless youth. Youth in motion have become socially invisible and marginalized from public spaces where social workers traditionally contact them, jeopardizing their access to the already limited opportunities to escape street life. The culmination of a multi-year ethnographic investigation into the lives of street outreach workers and ‘their kids’ on the streets of New York City, Street Kids illustrates the critical role that public space regulations and policing play in shaping the experience of youth homelessness and the effectiveness of street outreach.

On Collective Memory

Author: Maurice Halbwachs

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226115962

Category: Philosophy

Page: 244

View: 4023

How do we use our mental images of the present to reconstruct our past? This volume, the first comprehensive English language translation of Maurice Halbwach's writings on the social construction of memory, fills a major gap in the literature on the sociology of knowledge.

The Heritage of War

Author: Martin Gegner,Bart Ziino

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136673830

Category: Art

Page: 288

View: 693

The Heritage of War is an interdisciplinary study of the ways in which heritage is mobilized in remembering war, and in reconstructing landscapes, political systems and identities after conflict. It examines the deeply contested nature of war heritage in a series of places and contexts, highlighting the modes by which governments, communities, and individuals claim validity for their own experiences of war, and the meanings they attach to them. From colonizing violence in South America to the United States’ Civil War, the Second World War on three continents, genocide in Rwanda and continuing divisions in Europe and the Middle East, these studies bring us closer to the very processes of heritage production. The Heritage of War uncovers the histories of heritage: it charts the constant social and political construction of heritage sites over time, by a series of different agents, and explores the continuous reworking of meaning into the present. What are the forces of contingency, agency and political power that produce, define and sustain the heritage of war? How do particular versions of the past and particular identities gain legitimacy, while others are marginalised? In this book contributors explore the active work by which heritage is produced and reproduced in a series of case studies of memorialization, battlefield preservation, tourism development, private remembering and urban reconstruction. These are the acts of making sense of war; they are acts that continue long after violent conflict itself has ended.

Sociology and Its Publics

The Forms and Fates of Disciplinary Organization

Author: Senior Research Fellow Terence C Halliday,Terence C. Halliday,Morris Janowitz

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226313795

Category: Social Science

Page: 429

View: 7092

Sociology faces troubling developments as it enters its second century in the United States. A loss of theoretical coherence and a sense of disciplinary fragmentation, a decline in the quality of its recruits, the cooptation of its clients, a muted public voice, and sinking prestige in governmental circles—these are only a few of the trends signalling a need for renewed debate about how sociology is organized. In this volume, some of the most authoritative voices in the field confront these conditions, offering a variety of perspectives as they challenge sociologists to self-examination.

Tuff City

Urban Change and Contested Space in Central Naples

Author: Nicholas T. Dines,Nick Dines

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857452797

Category: Social Science

Page: 347

View: 3155

During the 1990s, Naples' left-wing administration sought to tackle the city's infamous reputation of being poor, crime-ridden, chaotic and dirty by reclaiming the city's cultural and architectural heritage. This book examines the conflicts surrounding the reimaging and reordering of the city's historic centre through detailed case studies of two piazzas and a centro sociale, focusing on a series of issues that include heritage, decorum, security, pedestrianization, tourism, immigration and new forms of urban protest. This monograph is the first in-depth study of the complex transformations of one of Europe's most fascinating and misunderstood cities. It represents a new critical approach to the questions of public space, citizenship and urban regeneration as well as a broader methodological critique of how we write about contemporary cities.

The City Below the Hill

A Sociological Study of a Portion of the City of Montreal, Canada

Author: Sir Herbert Brown Ames

Publisher: Social History of Canada

ISBN: 9780802061423

Category: Social Science

Page: 116

View: 9927

The city below the hill is a detailed investigation of social conditions in a working class quarter of Montreal during the 1890s. Based on a house-to-house survey of the neighbourhood, this study catalogues and analyses the life of working people after the first years of rapid industrialization. Sir Herbert Brown Ames was one of the first to recognize that urbanization was inevitable and to set about improving the quality of city life. In this study, first published in book form in 1897, he moves towards the concept of urban ecology--the city is an organism defined by, and expressing itself in, a myriad of social and economic phenomena. As an organic whole its well-being depends upon the well-being of all its citizens. Within this pioneering work are the seeds of the town planning and social welfare movements that later tried to change the urban landscape. The city below the hill is crammed with facts and statistical analyses of late nineteenth century urban workers. A landmark in the development of urban consciousness in Canada and of sociological research, it is one of the first major efforts to solve problems that are still with us.

Robert K. Merton

Sociology of Science and Sociology as Science

Author: Craig Calhoun

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231151128

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 7099

Includes bibliographical references (p. ) and index.

Library Journal

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Libraries

Page: N.A

View: 7118

Includes, beginning Sept. 15, 1954 (and on the 15th of each month, Sept.-May) a special section: School library journal, ISSN 0000-0035, (called Junior libraries, 1954-May 1961). Also issued separately.

Within the Social World

Essays in Social Psychology

Author: Jeffrey Chuan-che Chin,Cardell K. Jacobson

Publisher: Pearson College Division

ISBN: 9780205498888

Category: Psychology

Page: 373

View: 6449

This anthology, designed to be accessible to undergraduate students, contains original and classic essays on social psychology from sociological perspectives.

Alabama in Africa

Booker T. Washington, the German Empire, and the Globalization of the New South

Author: Andrew Zimmerman

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691155860

Category: History

Page: 397

View: 5711

In 1901, the Tuskegee Institute, founded by Booker T. Washington, sent an expedition to the German colony of Togo in West Africa, with the purpose of transforming the region into a cotton economy similar to that of the post-Reconstruction American South. Alabama in Africa explores the politics of labor, sexuality, and race behind this endeavor, and the economic, political, and intellectual links connecting Germany, Africa, and the southern United States. The cross-fertilization of histories and practices led to the emergence of a global South, reproduced social inequities on both sides of the Atlantic, and pushed the American South and the German Empire to the forefront of modern colonialism. Zimmerman shows how the people of Togo, rather than serving as a blank slate for American and German ideologies, helped shape their region's place in the global South. He looks at the forms of resistance pioneered by African American freedpeople, Polish migrant laborers, African cotton cultivators, and other groups exploited by, but never passive victims of, the growing colonial political economy. Zimmerman reconstructs the social science of the global South formulated by such thinkers as Max Weber and W.E.B. Du Bois, and reveals how their theories continue to define contemporary race, class, and culture. Tracking the intertwined histories of Europe, Africa, and the Americas at the turn of the century, Alabama in Africa shows how the politics and economics of the segregated American South significantly reshaped other areas of the world.

Present Pasts

Urban Palimpsests and the Politics of Memory

Author: Andreas Huyssen

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804745611

Category: History

Page: 177

View: 7056

This book analyzes the relation of public memory to history, forgetting, and selective memory in three late-twentieth-century cities that have confronted major social or political traumas—Berlin, Buenos Aires, and New York.