The Beggar's Opera and Polly

Author: John Gay

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191645761

Category: Drama

Page: 256

View: 2336

'Gamesters and Highwaymen are generally very good to their Whores, but they are very Devils to their Wives.' With The Beggar's Opera (1728), John Gay created one of the most enduringly popular works in English theatre history, and invented a new dramatic form, the ballad opera. Gay's daring mixture of caustic political satire, well-loved popular tunes, and a story of crime and betrayal set in the urban underworld of prostitutes and thieves was an overnight sensation. Captain Macheath and Polly Peachum have become famous well beyond the confines of Gay's original play, and in its sequel, Polly, banned in Gay's lifetime, their adventures continue in the West Indies. With a cross-dressing heroine and a cast of female adventurers, pirates, Indian princes, rebel slaves, and rapacious landowners, Polly lays bare a culture in which all human relationships are reduced to commercial transactions. Raucous, lyrical, witty, ironic and tragic by turns, The Beggar's Opera and Polly - published together here for the first time - offer a scathing and ebullient portrait of a society in which statesmen and outlaws, colonialists and pirates, are impossible to tell apart. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

Narratives of Inequality

Postcolonial Literary Economics

Author: Melissa Kennedy

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319599577

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 229

View: 5523

This book reveals the economic motivations underpinning colonial, neocolonial and neoliberal eras of global capitalism that are represented in critiques of inequality in postcolonial fiction. Today’s economic inequality, suffered disproportionately by indigenous and minority groups of postcolonial societies in both developed and developing countries, is a direct outcome of the colonial-era imposition of capitalist structures and practices. The longue durée, world-systems approach in this study reveals repeating patterns and trends in the mechanics of capitalism that create and maintain inequality. As well as this, it reveals the social and cultural beliefs and practices that justify and support inequality, yet equally which resist and condemn it. Through analysis of narrative representations of wealth accumulation and ownership, structures of internal inequality between the rich and the poor within cultural communities, and the psychology of capitalism that engenders particular emotions and behaviour, this study brings postcolonial literary economics to the neoliberal debate, arguing for the important contribution of the imaginary to the pressing issue of economic inequality and its solutions.

The Sin of Abbé Mouret

Author: Émile Zola

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191056332

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 336

View: 8715

'I really don't understand how people can blame a priest so much, when he strays from the path.' The Sin of Abbé Mouret tells the compelling story of the young priest Serge Mouret. Striving after spiritual purity and sanctity, he lives a life of constant prayer, but his neglect of all physical needs leads to serious illness, followed by amnesia. No longer knowing he is a priest, he falls in love with his nurse Albine. Together, like a latter-day Adam and Eve, they roam through an Eden-like garden called the 'Paradou', seeking a forbidden tree in whose shade they will make love. Zola memorably shows their gradual awakening to sexuality, and his poetic descriptions of the luxuriant and beautiful Paradou create a lyrical celebration of Nature. When Serge regains his memory and recalls his priestly vows, anguish inevitably follows. The whole story, with its numerous biblical parallels, becomes a poetic reworking of the Fall of Man and a questioning of the very meaning of innocence and sin. Zola explores the conflict between Church and Nature, the sterility of the Church and the fertility of Nature. This new translation includes a wide-ranging and helpful introduction and explanatory notes.

The Beggar's Opera

Author: John Gay

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408143828

Category: Drama

Page: 160

View: 7311

Mr. and Mrs. Peachum are horrified when they learn of their daughter Polly's secret marriage to the rebellious and notorious highwayman, Macheath. However, their fear is soon mitigated when they decide to kill him for his money. When Macheath is in the tavern, surrounded by women of 'ill repute', he discovers that he has been rumbled: two of these women are in cahoots with the Peachums and plan to kill him. He finds himself in Newgate and, worse than that, in the company of the jailer's daughter, Lucy, to whom he is also betrothed. Although Macheath is captured and destined to be hanged, Gay's action-packed and entertaining play subverts audience expectations by letting Macheath off the hook and not punishing its villains. John Gay's satirical opera, written in 1728, was revolutionary because it took poverty and corruption as its subject, and paupers and villains as its characters. The lyrics were set to famous songs of the day making it hugely popular with audiences and a radical departure from traditional opera. The introduction puts the play in its historical and theatrical contexts and details its stage history in modern times too. David Lindley is an expert on theatrical music and the new dramatic form of ballad opera this play created. The music for the songs is included in the text, making this an edition to be used for performance as well as for study.

Literature Criticism from 1400 to 1800

Excerpts from Criticism of the Works of Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Seventeenth, and Eighteenth-century Novelists, Poets, Playwrights, Philosophers, and Other Creative Writers, from the First Published Critical Appraisals to Current Evaluations

Author: Dennis Poupard,Marie Lazzari,Gale Group,Mark Scott

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 2219


English theatre music in the eighteenth century

Author: Roger Fiske

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 684

View: 8977

This revised edition discusses all the dramatic genres of the 18th-century English theater from pantomime to opera, and vividly portrays its chief protagonists in an entertaining prose style, liberally peppered with anecdotes. In addition to covering in detail the classics of the century--such as Gay's The Beggar's Opera--Fiske provides a wealth of illustrative musical examples, appendices of surviving music, and short biographies of the main performers.

Shamela

Author: Henry Fielding

Publisher: neobooks

ISBN: 3742708562

Category: Fiction

Page: 66

View: 3685

Der hier vorgelegte Text ist nicht nur die erste deutsche Übersetzung, die jemals von Henry Fieldings Kurzroman „An Apology for the Life of Mrs. Shamela Andrews“, kurz „Shamela“ genannt, angefertigt wurde, sondern die erste Übersetzung in eine Fremdsprache überhaupt. Das Buch erschien im April 1741 als eine satirische Attacke auf Samuel Richardsons Briefroman „Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded“, der seit seiner ersten Veröffentlichung im November 1740 in England eine Furore machte, wie sie in der Literaturgeschiche wohl einmalig ist, und auch auf dem Festland hohe Wellen schlug.