The Atlas of Ancient Rome

Biography and Portraits of the City

Author: Andrea Carandini

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780691163475

Category: History

Page: 1248

View: 2174

"The Atlas of Ancient Rome" provides a comprehensive archaeological survey of the city of Rome from prehistory to the medieval period. Lavishly illustrated throughout with full-color maps, drawings and photos, and 3D reconstructions, this magnificent two-volume slipcased edition is destined to become the standard reference for scholars, students, and anyone interested in Rome and its history and art. "The Atlas of Ancient Rome" is monumental in scope. It examines the city's topography and political-administrative divisions, trade and economic production, and social landscape and infrastructure--from residential neighborhoods and gardens to walls, roads, aqueducts, and sewers. It describes the fourteen regions of Rome and the urban history of each one in unprecedented detail, and includes profiles and reconstructions of major monuments and works of art. This is the only atlas of the ancient city to incorporate the most current archaeological findings and the latest mapping technologies. In addition, the book is organized thematically and topographically rather than alphabetically--providing readers with a topographic perspective on the city as a whole rather than a series of discrete essays--and also includes invaluable material on late antique and early medieval Rome. Authoritative and easy to use, "The Atlas of Ancient Rome" is the definitive illustrated reference book on the urban history of this legendary city from its origin to the sixth century.Features a wealth of maps, illustrations, and 3D reconstructionsCovers Rome's topography, economy, urban infrastructure, and moreIncludes profiles of major monuments and works of artDraws on the latest archaeological findings and mapping technologiesA decade in the making by a team of leading experts

Rome

A Living Portrait of an Ancient City

Author: Stephen L. Dyson

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421401010

Category: History

Page: 488

View: 2488

In doing so, he offers a dramatic picture of a complex and changing urban center that, despite its flaws, flourished for centuries.

Performance, Memory, and Processions in Ancient Rome

The Pompa Circensis from the Late Republic to Late Antiquity

Author: Jacob A. Latham

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316692426

Category: History

Page: 345

View: 1827

The pompa circensis, the procession which preceded the chariot races in the arena, was both a prominent political pageant and a hallowed religious ritual. Traversing a landscape of memory, the procession wove together spaces and institutions, monuments and performers, gods and humans into an image of the city, whose contours shifted as Rome changed. In the late Republic, the parade produced an image of Rome as the senate and the people with their gods - a deeply traditional symbol of the city which was transformed during the empire when an imperial image was built on top of the republican one. In late antiquity, the procession fashioned a multiplicity of Romes: imperial, traditional, and Christian. In this book, Jacob A. Latham explores the webs of symbolic meanings in the play between performance and itinerary, tracing the transformations of the circus procession from the late Republic to late antiquity.

The Roman Street

Urban Life and Society in Pompeii, Herculaneum, and Rome

Author: Jeremy Hartnett

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107105706

Category: Architecture

Page: 380

View: 3664

Every day Roman urbanites took to the street for myriad tasks, from hawking vegetables and worshipping local deities to simply loitering and socializing. Hartnett takes readers into this thicket of activity as he repopulates Roman streets with their full range of sensations, participants, and events that stretched far beyond simple movement. As everyone from slave to senator met in this communal space, city dwellers found unparalleled opportunities for self-aggrandizing display and the negotiation of social and political tensions. Hartnett charts how Romans preened and paraded in the street, and how they exploited the street's collective space to lob insults and respond to personal rebukes. Combining textual evidence, comparative historical material, and contemporary urban theory with architectural and art historical analysis, The Roman Street offers a social and cultural history of urban spaces that restores them to their rightful place as primary venues for social performance in the ancient world.

The Roman Forum

A Reconstruction and Architectural Guide

Author: Gilbert J. Gorski,James E. Packer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 131606039X

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 4475

The Roman Forum was in many ways the heart of the Roman Empire. Today, the Forum exists in a fragmentary state, having been destroyed and plundered by barbarians, aristocrats, citizens and priests over the past two millennia. Enough remains, however, for archaeologists to reconstruct its spectacular buildings and monuments. This richly illustrated volume provides an architectural history of the central section of the Roman Forum during the Empire (31 BCE–476 CE), from the Temple of Julius Caesar to the monuments on the slope of the Capitoline hill. Bringing together state-of-the-art technology in architectural illustration and the expertise of a prominent Roman archaeologist, this book offers a unique reconstruction of the Forum, providing architectural history, a summary of each building's excavation and research, scaled digital plans, elevations, and reconstructed aerial images that not only shed light on the Forum's history but vividly bring it to life. With this book, scholars, students, architects and artists will be able to visualize for the first time since antiquity the character, design and appearance of the famous heart of ancient Rome.

Rome

An Urban History from Antiquity to the Present

Author: Rabun Taylor,Katherine Rinne,Spiro Kostof

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107013992

Category: Architecture

Page: 450

View: 8153

This is the first urban history of Rome to span its entire three-thousand-year history. It examines the processes by which Rome's leaders have shaped its urban fabric by organizing space, planning infrastructure, designing ritual, controlling populations, and exploiting Rome's standing as a seat of global power and a religious capital.

Campus Martius

Author: Paul W. Jacobs, II,Diane Atnally Conlin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107023203

Category: Architecture

Page: 268

View: 7351

A mosquito-infested and swampy plain lying north of the city walls, Rome's Campus Martius, or Field of Mars, was used for much of the period of the Republic as a military training ground and as a site for celebratory rituals and occasional political assemblies. Initially punctuated with temples vowed by victorious generals, during the imperial era it became filled with extraordinary baths, theaters, porticoes, aqueducts, and other structures - many of which were architectural firsts for the capitol. This book explores the myriad factors that contributed to the transformation of the Campus Martius from an occasionally visited space to a crowded center of daily activity. It presents a case study of the repurposing of urban landscape in the Roman world and explores how existing topographical features that fit well with the Republic's needs ultimately attracted architecture that forever transformed those features but still resonated with the area's original military and ceremonial traditions.

The Architecture of Roman Temples

The Republic to the Middle Empire

Author: John W. Stamper

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521810685

Category: Architecture

Page: 287

View: 3199

This book examines the development of Roman temple architecture from its earliest history in the sixth century BC to the reigns of Hadrian and the Antonines in the second century AD. John Stamper analyzes the temples' formal qualities, the public spaces in which they were located and, most importantly, the authority of precedent in their designs. He also traces Rome's temple architecture as it evolved over time and how it accommodated changing political and religious contexts, as well as the affects of new stylistic influences.

The Architecture of the Roman Triumph

Monuments, Memory, and Identity

Author: Maggie L. Popkin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107103576

Category: Architecture

Page: 310

View: 424

This book offers the first critical study of the architecture of the Roman triumph, ancient Rome's most important victory ritual. Through case studies ranging from the republican to imperial periods, it demonstrates how powerfully monuments shaped how Romans performed, experienced, and remembered triumphs and, consequently, how Romans conceived of an urban identity for their city. Monuments highlighted Roman conquests of foreign peoples, enabled Romans to envision future triumphs, made triumphs more memorable through emotional arousal of spectators, and even generated distorted memories of triumphs that might never have occurred. This book illustrates the far-reaching impact of the architecture of the triumph on how Romans thought about this ritual and, ultimately, their own place within the Mediterranean world. In doing so, it offers a new model for historicizing the interrelations between monuments, individual and shared memory, and collective identities.

The Story of Hebrew

Author: Lewis Glinert

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400884780

Category: Religion

Page: 296

View: 6466

A unique history of the Hebrew language from biblical times to the modern Jewish state This book explores the extraordinary hold that Hebrew has had on Jews and Christians, who have invested it with a symbolic power far beyond that of any other language in history. Preserved by the Jews across two millennia, Hebrew endured long after it ceased to be a mother tongue, resulting in one of the most intense textual cultures ever known. It was a bridge to Greek and Arab science. It unlocked the biblical sources for Jerome and the Reformation. Kabbalists and humanists sought philosophical truth in it, and Colonial Americans used it to shape their own Israelite political identity. Today, it is the first language of millions of Israelis. The Story of Hebrew takes readers from the opening verses of Genesis—which seemingly describe the creation of Hebrew itself—to the reincarnation of Hebrew as the everyday language of the Jewish state. Lewis Glinert explains the uses and meanings of Hebrew in ancient Israel and its role as a medium for wisdom and prayer. He describes the early rabbis' preservation of Hebrew following the Babylonian exile, the challenges posed by Arabic, and the prolific use of Hebrew in Diaspora art, spirituality, and science. Glinert looks at the conflicted relationship Christians had with Hebrew from the Renaissance to the Counter-Reformation, the language's fatal rivalry with Yiddish, the dreamers and schemers that made modern Hebrew a reality, and how a lost pre-Holocaust textual ethos is being renewed today by Orthodox Jews. A major work of scholarship, The Story of Hebrew is an unforgettable account of what one language has meant to those possessing it.

The Shape of the Roman Order

The Republic and Its Spaces

Author: Daniel J. Gargola

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469631830

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 3156

In recent years, a long-established view of the Roman Empire during its great age of expansion has been called into question by scholars who contend that this model has made Rome appear too much like a modern state. This is especially true in terms of understanding how the Roman government ordered the city--and the world around it--geographically. In this innovative, systematic approach, Daniel J. Gargola demonstrates how important the concept of space was to the governance of Rome. He explains how Roman rulers, without the means for making detailed maps, conceptualized the territories under Rome's power as a set of concentric zones surrounding the city. In exploring these geographic zones and analyzing how their magistrates performed their duties, Gargola examines the idiosyncratic way the elite made sense of the world around them and how it fundamentally informed the way they ruled over their dominion. From what geometrical patterns Roman elites preferred to how they constructed their hierarchies in space, Gargola considers a wide body of disparate materials to demonstrate how spatial orientation dictated action, shedding new light on the complex peculiarities of Roman political organization.

Rome

A History in Seven Sackings

Author: Matthew Kneale

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501191101

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 6502

"Kneale's account is a masterpiece of pacing and suspense. Characters from the city's history spring to life in his hands." —The Sunday Times (London) Novelist and historian Matthew Kneale, a longtime resident of Rome, tells the story of the Eternal City—from the early Roman Republic through the Renaissance and the Reformation to Mussolini and the German occupation in World War Two—through pivotal moments that defined its history. Rome, the Eternal City. It is a hugely popular tourist destination with a rich history, famed for such sites as the Colosseum, the Forum, the Pantheon, St. Peter’s, and the Vatican. In no other city is history as present as it is in Rome. Today visitors can stand on bridges that Julius Caesar and Cicero crossed; walk around temples in the footsteps of emperors; visit churches from the earliest days of Christianity. This is all the more remarkable considering what the city has endured over the centuries. It has been ravaged by fires, floods, earthquakes, and—most of all—by roving armies. These have invaded repeatedly, from ancient times to as recently as 1943. Many times Romans have shrugged off catastrophe and remade their city anew. Matthew Kneale uses seven of these crisis moments to create a powerful and captivating account of Rome’s extraordinary history. He paints portraits of the city before each assault, describing what it looked like, felt like, smelled like and how Romans, both rich and poor, lived their everyday lives. He shows how the attacks transformed Rome—sometimes for the better. With drama and humor he brings to life the city of Augustus, of Michelangelo and Bernini, of Garibaldi and Mussolini, and of popes both saintly and very worldly. He shows how Rome became the chaotic and wondrous place it is today. Rome: A History in Seven Sackings offers a unique look at a truly remarkable city.

Rome

Day One

Author: Andrea Carandini

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691180792

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 5343

Andrea Carandini's archaeological discoveries and controversial theories about ancient Rome have made international headlines over the past few decades. In this book, he presents his most important findings and ideas, including the argument that there really was a Romulus--a first king of Rome--who founded the city in the mid-eighth century BC, making it the world's first city-state, as well as its most influential. Rome: Day One makes a powerful and provocative case that Rome was established in a one-day ceremony, and that Rome's first day was also Western civilization's. Historians tell us that there is no more reason to believe that Rome was actually established by Romulus than there is to believe that he was suckled by a she-wolf. But Carandini, drawing on his own excavations as well as historical and literary sources, argues that the core of Rome's founding myth is not purely mythical. In this illustrated account, he makes the case that a king whose name might have been Romulus founded Rome one April 21st in the mid-eighth century BC, most likely in a ceremony in which a white bull and cow pulled a plow to trace the position of a wall marking the blessed soil of the new city. This ceremony establishing the Palatine Wall, which Carandini discovered, inaugurated the political life of a city that, through its later empire, would influence much of the world. Uncovering the birth of a city that gave birth to a world, Rome: Day One reveals as never before a truly epochal event.

The Roads of Roman Italy

Mobility and Cultural Change

Author: Ray Laurence

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136823875

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 1488

The Roads of Roman Italy offers a complete re-evaluation of both the evidence and the interpretation of Roman land transport. The book utilises archaeological, epigraphic and literary evidence for Roman communications, drawing on recent approaches to the human landscape developed by geographers. Among the topics considered are: * the relationship between the road and the human landscape * the administration and maintenance of the road system * the role of roads as imperial monuments * the economics of road construction and urban development.

Unwritten Rome

Author: Timothy Peter Wiseman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780859898225

Category: Art

Page: 366

View: 6759

How can one begin to understand a society that didn't write down its own history? In the case of Rome, the texts we have available—from the Bronze Age through the conquest of Italy around 300 BC—were all written centuries later, and their view of early Roman culture is impossibly anachronistic. Authentic evidence lurks under the surface, however—in the old stories of a Roman king acting like a magician, and the traditional custom that may have originated the practice of ritual prostitution, for example—and Unwritten Rome applies eighteen methods in order to discover this material, tease it out, and make sense of its social and historical context. T. P. Wiseman, the much celebrated author of The Myths of Rome, presents an imaginative, appealing, and well-illustrated picture of pre-literary Rome, a free and uninhibited world in which the arts and popular entertainment flourished. Covering the authentic voice of the Roman people from contemporary artifacts, monuments, and passages of later literature, Unwritten Rome continues Wiseman's daring efforts to rewrite the history of Roman literature.

Gardens of the Roman Empire

Author: Wilhelmina F. Jashemski,Kathryn L. Gleason,Kim J. Hartswick,Amina-Aïcha Malek

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108325831

Category: Art

Page: N.A

View: 9659

In Gardens of the Roman Empire, the pioneering archaeologist Wilhelmina F. Jashemski sets out to examine the role of ancient Roman gardens in daily life throughout the empire. This study, therefore, includes for the first time, archaeological, literary, and artistic evidence about ancient Roman gardens across the entire Roman Empire from Britain to Arabia. Through well-illustrated essays by leading scholars in the field, various types of gardens are examined, from how Romans actually created their gardens to the experience of gardens as revealed in literature and art. Demonstrating the central role and value of gardens in Roman civilization, Jashemski and a distinguished, international team of contributors have created a landmark reference work that will serve as the foundation for future scholarship on this topic.

The Great Leveler

Violence and the History of Inequality from the Stone Age to the Twenty-First Century

Author: Walter Scheidel

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691184313

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 6003

Are mass violence and catastrophes the only forces that can seriously decrease economic inequality? To judge by thousands of years of history, the answer is yes. Tracing the global history of inequality from the Stone Age to today, Walter Scheidel shows that it never dies peacefully. The Great Leveler is the first book to chart the crucial role of violent shocks in reducing inequality over the full sweep of human history around the world. The “Four Horsemen” of leveling—mass-mobilization warfare, transformative revolutions, state collapse, and catastrophic plagues—have repeatedly destroyed the fortunes of the rich. Today, the violence that reduced inequality in the past seems to have diminished, and that is a good thing. But it casts serious doubt on the prospects for a more equal future. An essential contribution to the debate about inequality, The Great Leveler provides important new insights about why inequality is so persistent—and why it is unlikely to decline anytime soon.

Emperors of Rome

The Story of Imperial Rome from Julius Caesar to the Last Emperor

Author: David Potter

Publisher: Quercus Publishing

ISBN: 1780873360

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 6762

The Emperors of Rome charts the rise and fall of the Roman Empire through profiles of the greatest and most notorious of the emperors, from the autocratic Augustus to the feeble Claudius, the vicious Nero to the beneficent Marcus Aurelius, through to the maniac Commodus and beyond. Interwoven with these are vivid descriptions of sports and art, political intrigues and historic events. In this entertaining and erudite work, acclaimed classical scholar David Potter brings Imperial Rome, and the lives of the men who ruled it, to vivid life.