The Art of Cruelty: A Reckoning

Author: Maggie Nelson

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393082237

Category: Art

Page: 304

View: 9398

“This is criticism at its best.”—Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times Writing in the tradition of Susan Sontag and Elaine Scarry, Maggie Nelson has emerged as one of our foremost cultural critics with this landmark work about representations of cruelty and violence in art. From Sylvia Plath’s poetry to Francis Bacon’s paintings, from the Saw franchise to Yoko Ono’s performance art, Nelson’s nuanced exploration across the artistic landscape ultimately offers a model of how one might balance strong ethical convictions with an equally strong appreciation for work that tests the limits of taste, taboo, and permissibility.

The Art of Cruelty

A Reckoning

Author: Maggie Nelson

Publisher: W. W. Norton

ISBN: 9780393343144

Category: Art

Page: 288

View: 6272

Discusses whether the brutal imagery present in today's reality and entertainment will shock society into a less alienated state and help create a just social order or whether focusing on representations of cruelty simply makes society more cruel. 10,000 first printing.

The Art of Cruelty

A Reckoning

Author: Maggie Nelson

Publisher: W. W. Norton

ISBN: 9780393072150

Category: Art

Page: 304

View: 1912

A fresh new voice in art and cultural criticism takes on the day's most pressing questions about representations of violence in art. Today both reality and entertainment crowd our fields of vision with brutal imagery. The pervasiveness of images of torture, horror, and war has all but demolished the twentieth-century hope that such imagery might shock us into a less alienated state, or aid in the creation of a just social order. What to do now? When to look, when to turn away? Genre-busting author Maggie Nelson brilliantly navigates this contemporary predicament, with an eye to the question of whether or not focusing on representations of cruelty makes us cruel. In a journey through high and low culture (Kafka to reality TV), the visual to the verbal (Paul McCarthy to Brian Evenson), and the apolitical to the political (Francis Bacon to Kara Walker), Nelson offers a model of how one might balance strong ethical convictions with an equally strong appreciation for work that tests the limits of taste, taboo, and permissibility.

Bluets

Author: Maggie Nelson

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1473548039

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 112

View: 2510

A Guardian Book of the Year Maggie Nelson is one of the most electrifying writers at work in America today, among the sharpest and most supple thinkers of her generation - Olivia Laing Bluets winds its way through depression, divinity, alcohol, and desire, visiting along the way with famous blue figures, including Joni Mitchell, Billie Holiday, Yves Klein, Leonard Cohen and Andy Warhol. While its narrator sets out to construct a sort of ‘pillow book’ about her lifelong obsession with the colour blue, she ends up facing down both the painful end of an affair and the grievous injury of a dear friend. The combination produces a raw, cerebral work devoted to the inextricability of pleasure and pain, and to the question of what role, if any, aesthetic beauty can play in times of great heartache or grief. Much like Roland Barthes’s A Lover’s Discourse, Bluets has passed between lovers in the ecstasy of new love, and been pressed into the hands of the heartbroken. Visceral, learned, and acutely lucid, Bluets is a slim feat of literary innovation and grace, never before published in the UK.

The Red Parts

Autobiography of a Trial

Author: Maggie Nelson

Publisher: Graywolf Press

ISBN: 1555979289

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 224

View: 6743

Late in 2004, Maggie Nelson was looking forward to the publication of her book Jane: A Murder, a narrative in verse about the life and death of her aunt, who had been murdered thirty-five years before. The case remained unsolved, but Jane was assumed to have been the victim of an infamous serial killer in Michigan in 1969. Then, one November afternoon, Nelson received a call from her mother, who announced that the case had been reopened; a new suspect would be arrested and tried on the basis of a DNA match. Over the months that followed, Nelson found herself attending the trial with her mother and reflecting anew on the aura of dread and fear that hung over her family and childhood--an aura that derived not only from the terrible facts of her aunt's murder but also from her own complicated journey through sisterhood, daughterhood, and girlhood. The Red Parts is a memoir, an account of a trial, and a provocative essay that interrogates the American obsession with violence and missing white women, and that scrupulously explores the nature of grief, justice, and empathy.

Jane

A Murder (Large Print 16pt)

Author: Maggie Nelson,Michael Muhammad Knight

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN: 1458781062

Category:

Page: 224

View: 375

Jane explores the nature of this haunting incident via a collage of poetry, prose, and documentary sources, including newspapers, related ''true crime'' books such as The Michigan Murders and Killers Among Us, and fragments from Jane's own diaries written when she was 13 and 21. Its eight sections cover Jane's childhood and early adulthood, her murder and its investigation, the direct and diffuse effect of her death on Nelson's girlhood and sisterhood, and a trip to Michigan Nelson took with her mother (Jane's sister) to retrace the path of Jane's final hours. Each piece in Jane has its own form that serves as an important fissure, disrupting the tabloid, ''page-turner'' quality of the story, and eventually returning the reader to deeper questions about girlhood, empathy, identification, and the essentially unknowable aspects of another's life and death. Part elegy, part memoir, part detective story, part meditation on violence, and part conversation between the living and the dead, Jane's powerful and disturbing subject matter, combined with its innovations in genre, expands the notion of what poetry can do - what kind of stories it can tell, and how it can tell them.

Something Bright, Then Holes

Poems

Author: Maggie Nelson

Publisher: Soft Skull Press

ISBN: 159376247X

Category: Poetry

Page: 96

View: 5298

These days the world seems to split up into those who need to dredge and those who shrug their shoulders and say, It’s just something that happened. While Maggie Nelson refers here to a polluted urban waterway, the Gowanus Canal, these words could just as easily describe Nelson’s incisive approach to desire, heartbreak, and emotional excavation in Something Bright, Then Holes. Whether writing from the debris-strewn shores of a contaminated canal or from the hospital room of a friend, Nelson charts each emotional landscape she encounters with unparalleled precision and empathy. Since its publication in 2007, the collection has proven itself to be both a record of a singular vision in the making as well as a timeless meditation on love, loss, and—perhaps most frightening of all—freedom.

Women, the New York School, and Other True Abstractions

Author: Maggie Nelson

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN: 1587296152

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 7209

Maggie Nelson provides the first extended consideration of the roles played by women in and around the New York School of poets, from the 1950s to the present, and offers unprecedented analyses of the work of Barbara Guest, Bernadette Mayer, Alice Notley, Eileen Myles, and abstract painter Joan Mitchell as well as a reconsideration of the work of many male New York School writers and artists from a feminist perspective.

The Argonauts

A Memoir

Author: Maggie Nelson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1555977073

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 143

View: 8936

Features a list of the mythological argonauts, provided online by Bob Fisher. Explains that according to Greek mythology, Jason assembled the argonauts to help him search for the golden fleece. Includes the name of each argonaut and his father. Notes the sources used.

Shiner

Author: Maggie Nelson

Publisher: Zed Books

ISBN: 9781786994653

Category:

Page: 88

View: 5478

In this electrifying and raw debut anthology, Maggie Nelson unpicks the everyday with the quick alchemy and precision of her later modern classics The Argonauts and Bluets. The poems of Shiner experiment with a variety of styles--syllabic verse, sonnets, macaronic translation, Zen poems, walking poems--to express love, bewilderment, grief, and beauty. This book, Nelson's first, heralded the arrival of a fully formed, virtuoso voice.

Regarding the Pain of Others

Author: Susan Sontag

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1466853573

Category: Social Science

Page: 144

View: 7060

A brilliant, clear-eyed new consideration of the visual representation of violence in our culture--its ubiquity, meanings, and effects Watching the evening news offers constant evidence of atrocity--a daily commonplace in our "society of spectacle." But are viewers inured -or incited--to violence by the daily depiction of cruelty and horror? Is the viewer's perception of reality eroded by the universal availability of imagery intended to shock? In her first full-scale investigation of the role of imagery in our culture since her now-classic book On Photography defined the terms of the debate twenty-five years ago, Susan Sontag cuts through circular arguments about how pictures can inspire dissent or foster violence as she takes a fresh look at the representation of atrocity--from Goya's The Disasters of War to photographs of the American Civil War, lynchings of blacks in the South, and Dachau and Auschwitz to contemporary horrific images of Bosnia, Sierra Leone, Rwanda, and New York City on September 11, 2001. As John Berger wrote when On Photography was first published, "All future discussions or analysis of the role of photography in the affluent mass-media societies is now bound to begin with her book." Sontag's new book, a startling reappraisal of the intersection of "information", "news," "art," and politics in the contemporary depiction of war and disaster, will be equally essential. It will forever alter our thinking about the uses and meanings of images in our world.

The Politics of Cruelty

An Essay on the Literature of Political Imprisonment

Author: Kate Millett

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393313123

Category: Political Science

Page: 335

View: 8339

It is, in the words of the noted Iraqi dissident Kanan Makiya, "a passionate, heroic effort to fathom the nature of a phenomenon that all too often drains us emotionally and incapacitates us intellectually." Millett analyzes the individual's monumental fear of the state through the rich literature of its expression—a mixture of literary text (Solzhenitsyn's , Mathabane's , Bharadwaj's film ), the reports of witnesses, legal theory, and historical account. The literary version of their experience is the most arresting; it prevails and persuades with the greatest effect: the reality of the victim, the social and psychological climate of life under dictatorship, the moment of capture when one is "disappeared," that pivotal electronic second after which nothing is ever the same.

The Age of the Crisis of Man

Thought and Fiction in America, 1933-1973

Author: Mark Greif

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400852102

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 448

View: 8022

In a midcentury American cultural episode forgotten today, intellectuals of all schools shared a belief that human nature was under threat. The immediate result was a glut of dense, abstract books on the "nature of man." But the dawning "age of the crisis of man," as Mark Greif calls it, was far more than a historical curiosity. In this ambitious intellectual and literary history, Greif recovers this lost line of thought to show how it influenced society, politics, and culture before, during, and long after World War II. During the 1930s and 1940s, fears of the barbarization of humanity energized New York intellectuals, Chicago protoconservatives, European Jewish émigrés, and native-born bohemians to seek "re-enlightenment," a new philosophical account of human nature and history. After the war this effort diffused, leading to a rebirth of modern human rights and a new power for the literary arts. Critics' predictions of a "death of the novel" challenged writers to invest bloodless questions of human nature with flesh and detail. Hemingway, Faulkner, and Richard Wright wrote flawed novels of abstract man. Succeeding them, Ralph Ellison, Saul Bellow, Flannery O'Connor, and Thomas Pynchon constituted a new guard who tested philosophical questions against social realities—race, religious faith, and the rise of technology—that kept difference and diversity alive. By the 1960s, the idea of "universal man" gave way to moral antihumanism, as new sensibilities and social movements transformed what had come before. Greif's reframing of a foundational debate takes us beyond old antagonisms into a new future, and gives a prehistory to the fractures of our own era.

The Empathy Exams

Essays

Author: Leslie Jamison

Publisher: Graywolf Press

ISBN: 1555970885

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 256

View: 9052

From personal loss to phantom diseases, The Empathy Exams is a bold and brilliant collection, winner of the Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize A Publishers Weekly Top Ten Essay Collection of Spring 2014 Beginning with her experience as a medical actor who was paid to act out symptoms for medical students to diagnose, Leslie Jamison's visceral and revealing essays ask essential questions about our basic understanding of others: How should we care about each other? How can we feel another's pain, especially when pain can be assumed, distorted, or performed? Is empathy a tool by which to test or even grade each other? By confronting pain—real and imagined, her own and others'—Jamison uncovers a personal and cultural urgency to feel. She draws from her own experiences of illness and bodily injury to engage in an exploration that extends far beyond her life, spanning wide-ranging territory—from poverty tourism to phantom diseases, street violence to reality television, illness to incarceration—in its search for a kind of sight shaped by humility and grace.

House of Reckoning

Author: John Saul

Publisher: Random House Digital, Inc.

ISBN: 0345514254

Category: Fiction

Page: 354

View: 3063

Outcast by an injury sustained from her father, foster child Sara Crane befriends a former mental patient and her art teacher and soon creates paintings of long-ago violent crimes committed by the inmates of a local asylum, a situation that is complicated by brutal attacks on two of Sarah's enemies. Reprint.

This Close to Happy

A Reckoning with Depression

Author: Daphne Merkin

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 0374711917

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 2905

A New York Times Book Review Favorite Read of 2016 “Despair is always described as dull,” writes Daphne Merkin, “when the truth is that despair has a light all its own, a lunar glow, the color of mottled silver.” This Close to Happy—Merkin’s rare, vividly personal account of what it feels like to suffer from clinical depression—captures this strange light. Daphne Merkin has been hospitalized three times: first, in grade school, for childhood depression; years later, after her daughter was born, for severe postpartum depression; and later still, after her mother died, for obsessive suicidal thinking. Recounting this series of hospitalizations, as well as her visits to myriad therapists and psychopharmacologists, Merkin fearlessly offers what the child psychiatrist Harold Koplewicz calls “the inside view of navigating a chronic psychiatric illness to a realistic outcome.” The arc of Merkin’s affliction is lifelong, beginning in a childhood largely bereft of love and stretching into the present, where Merkin lives a high-functioning life and her depression is manageable, if not “cured.” “The opposite of depression,” she writes with characteristic insight, “is not a state of unimaginable happiness . . . but a state of relative all-right-ness.” In this dark yet vital memoir, Merkin describes not only the harrowing sorrow that she has known all her life, but also her early, redemptive love of reading and gradual emergence as a writer. Written with an acute understanding of the ways in which her condition has evolved as well as affected those around her, This Close to Happy is an utterly candid coming-to-terms with an illness that many share but few talk about, one that remains shrouded in stigma. In the words of the distinguished psychologist Carol Gilligan, “It brings a stunningly perceptive voice into the forefront of the conversation about depression, one that is both reassuring and revelatory.”

The Latest Winter

Author: Maggie Nelson

Publisher: Zed Books

ISBN: 9781786994691

Category:

Page: 88

View: 2461

In this, her second anthology of poetry, Maggie Nelson experiments with poetic forms long and short as she charts intimate landscapes, including the poet's enmeshment in a beloved city--New York--before and after the events of 9/11. The poems of The Latest Winter are rich with wit, melancholy, terror, curiosity, and love.

Tender Points

Author: Amy Berkowitz

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781937421151

Category:

Page: 136

View: 9881

Literary Nonfiction. Women's Studies. Disability Studies. TENDER POINTS is a narrative fractured by trauma. Named after the diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia, the book-length lyric essay explores sexual violence, gendered illness, chronic pain, and patriarchy through the lenses of lived experience and pop culture (Twin Peaks, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, noise music, etc.). Praise for TENDER POINTS: "TENDER POINTS does precisely what people are always saying can't be done it combines a moving, distilled, literary journey with advocacy and even pedagogy, here about trauma, chronic pain, patriarchy, and more. Call it "ecriture feminine en homme," if you want (as Berkowitz does, with acid wit) but whatever you call it, this is firm, high- stakes speech speaking truth to power, radiating beauty and fierceness from its inspiring insistence and persistence." Maggie Nelson "'Trauma is nonlinear, ' writes Berkowitz. I am impressed by the sensing form she makes. That has the day in it, as well as the night. The body, that is, in variable settings, frames and weathers. The stairs that 'climb up my arms and neck.' The 'I am bitterly jealous of people who can always go back to being a barista for a while.' This book is a kind of clutching and being there for real, and that is what I like. A book. That takes up. A visceral form." Bhanu Kapil "TENDER POINTS is one of those books that feels necessary. It takes on rape culture and cops and doctors, the whole long history of who gets to speak and how, who gets heard and who doesn't and why not. I wish this book wasn't as necessary as it is, but I'm so grateful to Amy for writing it." Stephanie Young"

The Final Reckoning

Deptford Mice Trilogy: Book Three

Author: Robin Jarvis

Publisher: Chronicle Books

ISBN: 9781587172441

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 304

View: 8229

The Deptford Mice and their allies rush once again into battle with old enemies, grown much more powerful, as a devastatingly cold winter threatens to keep the Green Mouse from returning in the spring. Reprint.