The American Culture of War

The History of U.S. Military Force from World War II to Operation Enduring Freedom

Author: Adrian R. Lewis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134845138

Category: History

Page: 564

View: 7669

Now in its third edition, The American Culture of War presents a sweeping critical examination of every major American war since 1941: World War II, Korea, Vietnam, the First and Second Persian Gulf Wars, U.S. operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the war against ISIS. As he carefully considers the cultural forces that surrounded each military engagement, Adrian Lewis offers an original and provocative look at the motives, people and governments used to wage war, the discord among military personnel, the flawed political policies that guided military strategy, and the civilian perceptions that characterized each conflict. This third edition features: A new structure focused more exclusively on the character and conduct of the wars themselves Updates to account for the latest, evolving scholarship on these conflicts An updated account of American military involvement in the Middle East, including the abrupt rise of ISIS The new edition of The American Culture of War remains a comprehensive and essential resource for any student of American wartime conduct.

Die Kultur der Niederlage

Der amerikanische Süden 1865 - Frankreich 1871 - Deutschland 1918

Author: Wolfgang Schivelbusch

Publisher: Rowohlt Verlag GmbH

ISBN: 3644018618

Category: History

Page: 470

View: 468

Zehn Jahre nach dem letzten großen Zusammenbruch, dem des sowjetischen Imperiums, scheint die Zeit reif für eine Reihe historischer Fragen. Destilliert aus der Geschichte der drei Niederlagenklassiker – des amerikanischen Südens nach 1865, Frankreichs nach 1871 und Deutschlands nach 1918 –, lassen sie sich etwa so formulieren: Wie wurden im Zeitalter der Erlöserideologie des Nationalsozialismus große Zusammenbrüche erlebt? Welche Mythen von Verrat oder Heroisierung bildeten sich dabei? Und welcher Zusammenhang besteht zwischen dem äußeren Unterliegen und jenen inneren Revolutionen, die der verlorene Krieg überall zur Folge hat? Wolfgang Schivelbusch ist diesen Fragen nachgegangen, und er zeichnet die aus tiefer Demütigung kommenden Energieschübe nach, die Niederlagen bringen. So legten sich die amerikanischen Südstaaten nach dem Bürgerkrieg erfolgreich ein legendenhaftes Images zu, das unter anderem «Vom Winde verweht» und seine Plantagenromantik schuf; so kam es in Frankreich nach 1871 zu umfassenden politischen und kulturellen Neuerungen; so brach das Deutsche Reich, nachdem der Erste Weltkrieg verloren war, auf etlichen Feldern in eine kraftvolle Moderne auf. Schivelbuschs Buch wird Staub aufwirbeln, auch weil es voller aktueller Bezugspunkte ist. Und es verweist auf die eigentümliche Stärke der Besiegten: daß sie früher und besser wissen, was die Stunde geschlagen hat.

Stalins letzte Opfer

verschleppte und erschossene Österreicher in Moskau, 1950-1953

Author: Stefan Karner

Publisher: Böhlau Verlag Wien

ISBN: 9783205782810

Category: Austria

Page: 676

View: 4747


Technology and the American Way of War Since 1945

Author: Thomas G. Mahnken

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231517882

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 5773

No nation in recent history has placed greater emphasis on the role of technology in planning and waging war than the United States. In World War II the wholesale mobilization of American science and technology culminated in the detonation of the atomic bomb. Competition with the Soviet Union during the Cold War, combined with the U.S. Navy's culture of distributed command and the rapid growth of information technology, spawned the concept of network-centric warfare. And America's post-Cold War conflicts in Iraq, the former Yugoslavia, and Afghanistan have highlighted America's edge. From the atom bomb to the spy satellites of the Cold War, the strategic limitations of the Vietnam War, and the technological triumphs of the Gulf war, Thomas G. Mahnken follows the development and integration of new technologies into the military and emphasizes their influence on the organization, mission, and culture of the armed services. In some cases, advancements in technology have forced different branches of the military to develop competing or superior weaponry, but more often than not the armed services have molded technology to suit their own purposes, remaining resilient in the face of technological challenges. Mahnken concludes with an examination of the reemergence of the traditional American way of war, which uses massive force to engage the enemy. Tying together six decades of debate concerning U.S. military affairs, he discusses how the armed forces might exploit the unique opportunities of the information revolution in the future.

Projections of War

Hollywood, American Culture, and World War II

Author: Thomas Doherty,Thomas Patrick Doherty

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231116350

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 382

View: 1128

In this lively cultural history, Doherty demonstrates that wartime Hollywood was not a rigidly controlled propaganda machine, as is often assumed, but an ad-hoc collaborative effort between the government and film industry.

War and American Popular Culture

A Historical Encyclopedia

Author: M. Paul Holsinger

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313299087

Category: History

Page: 479

View: 9488

From the American Colonial Wars to our peacekeeper role in Bosnia, this book brings together information on books, drama, songs, films, and other works that have mythologized our nation's many wars.

The Scar That Binds

American Culture and the Vietnam War

Author: Keith Beattie

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814786109

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 7976

At the height of the Vietnam War, American society was so severely fragmented that it seemed that Americans may never again share common concerns. The media and other commentators represented the impact of the war through a variety of rhetorical devices, most notably the emotionally charged metaphor of "the wound that will not heal." References in various contexts to veterans' attempts to find a "voice," and to bring the war "home" were also common. Gradually, an assured and resilient American self-image and powerful impressions of cultural collectivity transformed the Vietnam war into a device for maintaining national unity. Today, the war is portrayed as a healed wound, the once "silenced" veteran has found a voice, and the American home has accommodated the effects of Vietnam. The scar has healed, binding Americans into a union that denies the divisions, diversities, and differences exposed by the war. In this way, America is now "over" Vietnam. In The Scar That Binds, Keith Beattie examines the central metaphors of the Vietnam war and their manifestations in American culture and life. Blending history and cultural criticism in a lucid style, this provocative book discusses an ideology of unity that has emerged through widespread rhetorical and cultural references to the war. A critique of this ideology reveals three dominant themes structured in a range of texts: the "wound," "the voice" of the Vietnam veteran, and "home." The analysis of each theme draws on a range of sources, including film, memoir, poetry, written and oral history, journalism, and political speeches. In contrast to studies concerned with representations of the war as a combat experience, The Scar That Binds opens and examines an unexplored critical space through a focus on the effects of the Vietnam War on American culture. The result is a highly original and compelling interpretation of the development of an ideology of unity in our culture.

The New American Way of War

Military Culture and the Political Utility of Force

Author: Ben Buley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134086423

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 1964

This book explores the cultural history and future prospects of the so-called ‘new American way of war’. In recent decades, American military culture has become increasingly dominated by a vision of ‘immaculate destruction’, which reached its apogee with the fall of Baghdad in 2003. Operation Iraqi Freedom was hailed as the triumphant validation of this new American way of war. For its most enthusiastic supporters, it also encapsulated a broader political vision. By achieving complete technical mastery of the battlefield, the US would render warfare surgical, humane, and predictable, and become a precisely calibrated instrument of national policy. American strategy has often been characterised as lacking in concern for the non-military consequences of actions. However, the chaotic aftermath of the Iraq War revealed the timeless truth that military success and political victory are not the same. In reality, the American way of war has frequently emerged as the contradictory expression of competing visions of war struggling for dominance since the early Cold War period. By tracing the origins and evolution of these competing views on the political utility of force, this book will set the currently popular image of a new American way of war in its broader historical, cultural and political context, and provide an assessment of its future prospects. This book will be of great interest to students of strategic studies, military theory, US foreign policy and international politics. It will be highly relevant for military practitioners interested in the fundamental concepts which continue to drive American strategic thinking in the contemporary battlegrounds of the War on Terror.

In/visible War

The Culture of War in Twenty-first-Century America

Author: Jon Simons,John Louis Lucaites

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813585406

Category: History

Page: 286

View: 6427

In/Visible War addresses a paradox of twenty-first century American warfare. The contemporary visual American experience of war is ubiquitous, and yet war is simultaneously invisible or absent; we lack a lived sense that “America” is at war. This paradox of in/visibility concerns the gap between the experiences of war zones and the visual, mediated experience of war in public, popular culture, which absents and renders invisible the former. Large portions of the domestic public experience war only at a distance. For these citizens, war seems abstract, or may even seem to have disappeared altogether due to a relative absence of visual images of casualties. Perhaps even more significantly, wars can be fought without sacrifice by the vast majority of Americans. Yet, the normalization of twenty-first century war also renders it highly visible. War is made visible through popular, commercial, mediated culture. The spectacle of war occupies the contemporary public sphere in the forms of celebrations at athletic events and in films, video games, and other media, coming together as MIME, the Military-Industrial-Media-Entertainment Network.

The War in American Culture

Society and Consciousness During World War II

Author: Lewis A. Erenberg,Susan E. Hirsch

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226215112

Category: History

Page: 346

View: 4384

The War in American Culture explores the role of World War II in the transformation of American social, cultural, and political life. World War II posed a crisis for American culture: to defeat the enemy, Americans had to unite across the class, racial and ethnic boundaries that had long divided them. Exploring government censorship of war photography, the revision of immigration laws, Hollywood moviemaking, swing music, and popular magazines, these essays reveal the creation of a new national identity that was pluralistic, but also controlled and sanitized. Concentrating on the home front and the impact of the war on the lives of ordinary Americans, the contributors give us a rich portrayal of family life, sexuality, cultural images, and working-class life in addition to detailed consideration of African Americans, Latinos, and women who lived through the unsettling and rapidly altered circumstances of wartime America.

At War

The Military and American Culture in the Twentieth Century and Beyond

Author: David Kieran,Edwin A. Martini

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813584329

Category: History

Page: 410

View: 5120

The country’s wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, its interventions around the world, and its global military presence make war, the military, and militarism defining features of contemporary American life. The armed services and the wars they fight shape all aspects of life—from the formation of racial and gendered identities to debates over environmental and immigration policy. Warfare and the military are ubiquitous in popular culture. At War offers short, accessible essays addressing the central issues in the new military history—ranging from diplomacy and the history of imperialism to the environmental issues that war raises and the ways that war shapes and is shaped by discourses of identity, to questions of who serves in the U.S. military and why and how U.S. wars have been represented in the media and in popular culture.

American Culture in the 1940s

Author: Jacqueline Foertsch

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748630341

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 653

This book explores the major cultural forms of 1940s America - fiction and non-fiction; music and radio; film and theatre; serious and popular visual arts - and key texts, trends and figures, from Native Son to Citizen Kane, from Hiroshima to HUAC, and from Dr Seuss to Bob Hope. After discussing the dominant ideas that inform the 1940s the book culminates with a chapter on the 'culture of war'. Rather than splitting the decade at 1945, Jacqueline Foertsch argues persuasively that the 1940s should be taken as a whole, seeking out links between wartime and postwar American culture.

Warfare and Culture in World History

Author: Wayne E. Lee

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814752772

Category: History

Page: 231

View: 7387

It has long been acknowledged that the study of war and warfare demands careful consideration of technology, institutions, social organization, and more. But, for some, the so-called "war and society" approach increasingly included everything but explained nothing, because it all too often seemed to ignore the events on the battlefield itself. The military historians in Warfare and Culture in World History return us to the battlefield, but they do so through a deep examination of the role of culture in shaping military institutions and military choices. Collected here are some of the most provocative recent efforts to analyze warfare through a cultural lens, drawing on and aggressively expanding traditional scholarship on war and society through sophisticated cultural analysis. With chapters ranging from an organizational analysis of American Civil War field armies to the soldiers' culture of late Republican Rome and debates within Ming Chinese officialdom over extermination versus pacification, this one volume provides a full range of case studies of how culture, whether societal, strategic, organizational, or military, could shape not only military institutions but also actual battlefield choices.

American Culture in the 1950s

Author: Martin Halliwell

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748628908

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 2811

This book provides a stimulating account of the dominant cultural forms of 1950s America: fiction and poetry; theatre and performance; film and television; music and radio; and the visual arts. Through detailed commentary and focused case studies of influential texts and events - from Invisible Man to West Side Story, from Disneyland to the Seattle World's Fair, from Rear Window to The Americans - the book examines the way in which modernism and the cold war offer two frames of reference for understanding the trajectory of postwar culture. The two core aims of this volume are to chart the changing complexion of American culture in the years following World War II and to provide readers with a critical investigation of 'the 1950s'. The book provides an intellectual context for approaching 1950s American culture and considers the historical impact of the decade on recent social and cultural developments.

The Puritan Culture of America's Military

U.S. Army War Crimes in Iraq and Afghanistan

Author: Ronald Lorenzo

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317018494

Category: Social Science

Page: 236

View: 6609

This book explores Puritanism and its continuing influence on U.S. and military law in the Global War on Terror, exploring connections between Puritanism and notions of responsibility in relation to military crimes, superstitious practices within the military, and urges for revenge. Engaging with the work of figures such as Durkheim, Fauconnet and Weber, it draws on primary data gathered through participation and observation at the U.S. Army courts-martial following events at Abu Ghraib, Operation Iron Triangle, the Baghdad canal killings and a war crimes case in Afghanistan, to show how Puritan cultural habits color and shape both American military actions and the ways in which these actions are perceived by the American public. A theoretically sophisticated examination of the cultural tendencies that shape military conduct and justice in the context of a contemporary global conflict, The Puritan Culture of America’s Military will appeal to scholars across the social sciences with interests in social theory and sociology, cultural studies, politics and international relations and military studies.

Hijacking History

American Culture and the War on Terror

Author: Liane Tanguay

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 0773587721

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 6603

In Hijacking History, Liane Tanguay unravels the ideology behind an American enterprise unprecedented in scope, ambition, and brazen claim to global supremacy: the War on Terror. She argues that the fears, anxieties, and even the hopes encoded in American popular culture account for the public's passive acceptance of the Bush administration’s wars overseas and violation of many of the rights, privileges, and freedoms they claimed to defend. In her analysis, Tanguay critically examines the neoconservative contention that the current system of liberal-democratic capitalism represents the peak of human evolution - a claim that creates the impression of a "post-historical" age. Establishing a continuity between the "post-historical" imaginary and the attacks of 9/11, the book examines the links between shifting justifications for the war, renewed militarism, and capitalist globalization. Reviewing a wide range of media including Hollywood films, network television, and presidential rhetoric, Tanguay calls for a revival of politics in popular culture and rejects the politics of fear as disseminated by mass media. A timely retrospective on the War on Terror, Hijacking History examines popular representations of US military action and dissects both the logic and the aesthetics by which the dominant discourses strive to justify war, while revealing how some of those forces can ultimately contribute to an ideology of resistance.

Religion and American Culture

A Reader

Author: David G. Hackett

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415942720

Category: Religion

Page: 550

View: 901

Religion and American Culture challenges the religion's traditional emphasis on older European, American, male, middle-class, Protestant, northeastern narratives concerned primarily with churches and theology. Breaking through the field with multicultural tales of Native American, African Americans and other groups that cut across boundaries of gender, class, religion and region, David Hackett's anthology offers an illuminating and comprehensive overview of the most exciting work currently underway in this field.

The American Experience in World War II: The American people at war : minorities and women in the Second World War

Author: Walter L. Hixson

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780415940382

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 3102

Relational Psychotherapy: A Primeradvances the understanding of this comprehensive, reliable model of treatment as it follows the trajectory of the therapy process from beginning to end. Using clear language and warm human terms, experienced therapist and teacher Patricia DeYoung addresses the challenges and rewards of doing relational therapy. She presents relational therapy against a wide range of contemporary psychotherapies, weaving a working synthesis of self psychology, intersubjective theory, various psychoanalytically informed developmental theories, relational psychoanalysis, and feminist self-in-relation theory. Relational Psychotherapyis an essential reference text for both therapists and students, while its personal and lucid writing style make it easily accessible to clients interested in learning more about psychotherapy.