Storm Warning

The Origins of the Weather Forecast

Author: Pauline Halford

Publisher: Sutton Pub Limited

ISBN: 9780750932158

Category: Science

Page: 285

View: 6413

A history of the daily weather forecast.

Storm Kings

The Untold History of America's First Tornado Chasers

Author: Lee Sandlin

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 030790816X

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 3976

In Storm Kings, Lee Sandlin retraces America's fascination and unique relationship to tornadoes and the weather. From Ben Franklin's early experiments, to "the great storm debates" of the nineteenth century, to heartland life in the early twentieth century, Sandlin shows how tornado chasing helped foster the birth of meteorology, recreating with vivid descriptions some of the most devastating storms in America's history. Drawing on memoirs, letters, eyewitness testimonies, and numerous archives, Sandlin brings to life the forgotten characters and scientists that changed a nation and how successive generations came to understand and finally coexist with the spiraling menace that could erase lives and whole towns in an instant.

Warnings

The True Story of how Science Tamed the Weather

Author: Michael Ray Smith

Publisher: Greenleaf Book Group

ISBN: 1608320340

Category: Nature

Page: 286

View: 9368

From the heart of tornado alley, Smith takes us into the eye of America's most devastating storms and behind the scenes of some of the world's most renowned scientific institutions to uncover the relationship between mankind and the weather.

History of the Meteorological Office

Author: Malcolm Walker

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139504487

Category: Science

Page: N.A

View: 8701

Malcolm Walker tells the story of the UK's national meteorological service from its formation in 1854 with a staff of four to its present position as a scientific and technological institution of national and international importance with a staff of nearly two thousand. The Met Office has long been at the forefront of research into atmospheric science and technology and is second to none in providing weather services to the general public and a wide range of customers around the world. The history of the Met Office is therefore largely a history of the development of international weather prediction research in general. In the modern era it is also at the forefront of the modelling of climate change. This volume will be of great interest to meteorologists, atmospheric scientists and historians of science, as well as amateur meteorologists and anyone interested generally in weather prediction.

The Hurricane

(revised 1938)

Author: Ivan Ray Tannehill

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Hurricanes

Page: 9

View: 1649


Origins of the European Economy

Communications and Commerce AD 300-900

Author: Michael McCormick,Francis Goelet Professor of Medieval History Michael McCormick,Michael (Harvard University McCormick, Massachusetts)

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521661027

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 1101

View: 1818

A comprehensive analysis of economic transition between the later Roman empire and Charlemagne's reigne.

The Nautical Magazine for 1873

Author: Various authors,Various

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108056520

Category: History

Page: 1072

View: 6770

The 1873 Nautical Magazine includes shipbuilding statistics, information on ports, fisheries and steam liners, and criticism of proposed seaworthiness legislation.

Acts of God

The Unnatural History of Natural Disaster in America

Author: Ted Steinberg

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199838992

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 7161

As the waters of the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain began to pour into New Orleans, people began asking the big question--could any of this have been avoided? How much of the damage from Hurricane Katrina was bad luck, and how much was poor city planning? Steinberg's Acts of God is a provocative history of natural disasters in the United States. This revised edition features a new chapter analyzing the failed response to Hurricane Katrina, a disaster Steinberg warned could happen when the book first was published. Focusing on America's worst natural disasters, Steinberg argues that it is wrong to see these tragedies as random outbursts of nature's violence or expressions of divine judgment. He reveals how the decisions of business leaders and government officials have paved the way for the greater losses of life and property, especially among those least able to withstand such blows--America's poor, elderly, and minorities. Seeing nature or God as the primary culprit, Steinberg explains, has helped to hide the fact that some Americans are simply better able to protect themselves from the violence of nature than others. In the face of revelations about how the federal government mishandled the Katrina calamity, this book is a must-read before further wind and water sweep away more lives. Acts of God is a call to action that needs desperately to be heard.

Hurricane Watch

Forecasting the Deadliest Storms on Earth

Author: Jack Williams,Bob Sheets

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780375713989

Category: Nature

Page: 352

View: 6629

The ultimate guide to the ultimate storms, Hurricane Watch is a fascinating blend of science and history from one of the world's foremost meteorologists and an award-winning science journalist. This in-depth look at these awe-inspiring acts of nature covers everything from the earliest efforts by seafarers at predicting storms to the way satellite imaging is revolutionizing hurricane forecasting. It reveals the latest information on hurricanes: their effects on ocean waves, the causes of the variable wind speeds in different parts of the storm, and the origins of the super-cooled shafts of water that vent at high altitudes. Hurricane Watch is a compelling history of man's relationship with the deadliest storms on earth. Includes: - The story of the nineteenth-century Cuban Jesuit whose success at predicting the great cyclones was considered almost mystical. - A new look at Isaac Cline, whose infamous failure to predict the Galveston Hurricane left him obsessed with the devastating effects of storm surge. - The story of the Hurricane Hunters, including the first man ever to deliberately fly into a hurricane. - A complete account of how computer modeling has changed hurricane tracking. - A history of Project Stormfury: the only significant, organized effort to reduce the damaging strength of severe hurricanes. - A unique firsthand account of Hurricane Andrew by both authors, who were at the National Hurricane Center when Andrew struck. - A listing of the deadliest storms in history. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Historical Perspectives on Climate Change

Author: James Rodger Fleming

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199885095

Category: Science

Page: 208

View: 9096

This intriguing volume provides a thorough examination of the historical roots of global climate change as a field of inquiry, from the Enlightenment to the late twentieth century. Based on primary and archival sources, the book is filled with interesting perspectives on what people have understood, experienced, and feared about the climate and its changes in the past. Chapters explore climate and culture in Enlightenment thought; climate debates in early America; the development of international networks of observation; the scientific transformation of climate discourse; and early contributions to understanding terrestrial temperature changes, infrared radiation, and the carbon dioxide theory of climate. But perhaps most important, this book shows what a study of the past has to offer the interdisciplinary investigation of current environmental problems.

Snow in the Cities

A History of America's Urban Response

Author: Blake McKelvey

Publisher: University Rochester Press

ISBN: 9781878822543

Category: Architecture

Page: 202

View: 6703

A useful chronicle of the evolution of the technology of snow removal. URBAN HISTORY A history of the social effects of and political response to the regular heavy snowfalls in the snow belt' cities of the United States.

The Origin and History of Missions

Containing Faithful Accounts of the Voyages, Travels, Labors and Successes of the Various Missionaries who Have Been Sent Forth to Evangelize the Heathen : Compiled from Authentic Documents, Forming a Complete Missionary Repository ...

Author: Thomas Smith,John Overton Choules

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Missions

Page: N.A

View: 5957


The Story of the British and Their Weather

Cloudy with a Chance of Rain

Author: Patrick Nobbs

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445644614

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 1098

The British weather. Subject of endless complaint, small-talk saviour of the British public, famously changeable. We all feel we know it well, as a largely benign and gentle backdrop to our lives. But how well do we really know it? The real story of British weather is in its history. The truth is, our weather has changed not only the course of our history and society dramatically, but even humanity itself. The extraordinary tale of Britain's weather and our relationship with it across the ages is told in this book. Recounting the greatest weather stories from the distant to the most recent past, it reveals a surprisingly frightening picture. Recent history alone includes a devastating tidal surge in 1953 that killed thousands around the North Sea coasts; bitter winter weather in 1947 and 1962/63 paralysed Britain economically, as did the dramatic water shortages caused by the 1975-76 drought. Whole communities have been wiped out in hours by devastating floods, while tornadoes, blizzards, gales, lightning and smog have all repeatedly caused death on a wide scale, even in the heart of London. And just as Icelandic volcanoes have shown more recently how ash can disrupt modern aircraft, so too have volcanoes influenced our weather catastrophically in the past, at one time sinking Napoleonic guns and shaping European politics, and at another almost ending humanity in its infancy. Well researched and divided up by weather type, this is a compelling read that clearly shows who is the real master of these islands and the ultimate controller of their destiny.

Florida's Hurricane History

Author: Jay Barnes

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807830682

Category: Nature

Page: 407

View: 6524

Featuring a comprehensive chronology of more than one hundred different storms, an informative and up-to-date account of the major hurricanes to hit Florida over the past four and a half centuries, and their human cost, includes more than one hundred illustrations and seventy-six maps. Simultaneous. UP.

What Stands in a Storm

A True Story of Love and Resilience in the Worst Superstorm in History

Author: Kim Cross

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476763089

Category: Nature

Page: 320

View: 8922

Enter the eye of the storm in this gripping real-life thriller—A Perfect Storm on land—that chronicles America’s biggest tornado outbreak since the beginning of recorded weather: a horrific three-day superstorm with 358 separate tornadoes touching down in twenty-one states and destroying entire towns. April 27, 2011 was the climax of a three-day superstorm that unleashed terror from Arkansas to New York. Entire communities were flattened, whole neighborhoods erased. Tornadoes left scars across the land so wide they could be seen from space. But from terrible destruction emerged everyday heroes—neighbors and strangers who rescued each other from hell on earth. “Armchair storm chasers will find much to savor in this grippingly detailed, real-time chronicle of nature gone awry” (Kirkus Reviews) set in Alabama, the heart of Dixie Alley where there are more tornado fatalities than anywhere else in the US. With powerful emotion and captivating detail, journalist Kim Cross expertly weaves together science and heartrending human stories. For some, it’s a story of survival; for others it’s the story of their last hours. Cross’s immersive reporting and dramatic storytelling catapult you to the center of the very worst hit areas, where thousands of ordinary people witnessed the sky falling around them. Yet from the disaster rises a redemptive message that’s just as real: in times of trouble, the things that tear our world apart reveal what holds us together.

Stories of Old-Time Oklahoma

Author: David Dary

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806151706

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 811

Do you know how Oklahoma came to have a panhandle? Did you know that Washington Irving once visited what is now Oklahoma? Can you name the official state rock, or list the courses in the official state meal? The answers to these questions, and others you may not have thought to ask, can be found in this engaging collection of tales by renowned journalist-historian David Dary. Most of the stories gathered here first appeared as newspaper articles during the state centennial in 2007. For this volume Dary has revised and expanded them—and added new ones. He begins with an overview of Oklahoma’s rich and varied history and geography, describing the origins of its trails, rails, and waterways and recounting the many tales of buried treasure that are part of Oklahoma lore. But the heart of any state is its people, and Dary introduces us to Oklahomans ranging from Indian leaders Quanah Parker and Satanta, to lawmen Bass Reeves and Bill Tilghman, to twentieth-century performing artists Woody Guthrie, Will Rogers, and Gene Autry. Dary also writes about forts and stagecoaches, cattle ranching and oil, outlaws and lawmen, inventors and politicians, and the names and pronunciation of Oklahoma towns. And he salutes such intellectual and artistic heroes as distinguished teacher and writer Angie Debo and artist and educator Oscar Jacobson, one of the first to focus world attention on Indian art. Reading this book is like listening to a knowledgeable old-timer regale his audience with historical anecdotes, “so it was said” tall tales, and musings on what it all means. Whether you’re a native of the Sooner State or a newcomer, you are sure to learn much from these accounts of the people, places, history, and folklore of Oklahoma.

The Social History of the American Family

An Encyclopedia

Author: Marilyn J. Coleman,Lawrence H. Ganong

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1483370429

Category: Social Science

Page: 2144

View: 9161

The American family has come a long way from the days of the idealized family portrayed in iconic television shows of the 1950s and 1960s. The four volumes of The Social History of the American Family explore the vital role of the family as the fundamental social unit across the span of American history. Experiences of family life shape so much of an individual’s development and identity, yet the patterns of family structure, family life, and family transition vary across time, space, and socioeconomic contexts. Both the definition of who or what counts as family and representations of the “ideal” family have changed over time to reflect changing mores, changing living standards and lifestyles, and increased levels of social heterogeneity. Available in both digital and print formats, this carefully balanced academic work chronicles the social, cultural, economic, and political aspects of American families from the colonial period to the present. Key themes include families and culture (including mass media), families and religion, families and the economy, families and social issues, families and social stratification and conflict, family structures (including marriage and divorce, gender roles, parenting and children, and mixed and non-modal family forms), and family law and policy. Features: Approximately 600 articles, richly illustrated with historical photographs and color photos in the digital edition, provide historical context for students. A collection of primary source documents demonstrate themes across time. The signed articles, with cross references and Further Readings, are accompanied by a Reader’s Guide, Chronology of American Families, Resource Guide, Glossary, and thorough index. The Social History of the American Family is an ideal reference for students and researchers who want to explore political and social debates about the importance of the family and its evolving constructions.

Studying Wisconsin

The Life of Increase Lapham, early chronicler of plants, rocks, rivers, mounds and all things Wisconsin

Author: Martha Bergland,Paul G. Hayes

Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society

ISBN: 0870206494

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 410

View: 6476

With masterful storytelling, Bergland and Hayes demonstrate how Lapham blended his ravenous curiosity with an equable temperament and a passion for detail to create a legacy that is still relevant today. —John Gurda In this long overdue tribute to Wisconsin’s first scientist, authors Martha Bergland and Paul G. Hayes explore the remarkable life and achievements of Increase Lapham (1811–1875). Lapham’s ability to observe, understand, and meticulously catalog the natural world marked all of his work, from his days as a teenage surveyor on the Erie Canal to his last great contribution as state geologist. Self-taught, Lapham mastered botany, geology, archaeology, limnology, mineralogy, engineering, meteorology, and cartography. A prolific writer, his 1844 guide to the territory was the first book published in Wisconsin. Asked late in life which field of science was his specialty, he replied simply, “I am studying Wisconsin.” Lapham identified and preserved thousands of botanical specimens. He surveyed and mapped Wisconsin’s effigy mounds. He was a force behind the creation of the National Weather Service, lobbying for a storm warning system to protect Great Lakes sailors. Told in compelling detail through Lapham’s letters, journals, books, and articles, Studying Wisconsin chronicles the life and times of Wisconsin’s pioneer citizen-scientist.

Out of the Blue

A History of Lightning: Science, Superstition, and Amazing Stories of Survival

Author: John Friedman

Publisher: Delacorte Press

ISBN: 9780440337829

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 590

The odds of being hit by lightning each year are only about 1 in 750,000 in the U.S. And yet this rare phenomenon has inspired both fear and fascination for thousands of years. In this groundbreaking, brilliantly researched book, journalist John S. Friedman probes lightning’s scientific, spiritual, and cultural roots. Blending vibrant history with riveting first-hand accounts of those who have clashed with lightning and lived to tell about it, Out of the Blue charts an extraordinary journey across the ages that explores our awe and dread in the face of one of nature’s most fearsome spectacles. Herman Melville called it “God’s burning finger.” The ancient Romans feared it as the wrath of God. Today we have a more scientific understanding, so why our eternal fascination with lightning? Out of the Blue attempts to understand this towering force of nature, exploring the changing perceptions of lightning from the earliest civilizations through Ben Franklin’s revolutionary experiments to the hair-raising adventures of storm chasers like David Hoadley, who’s been chronicling extreme weather for half a century. And Friedman describes one of the most treacherous rescues ever attempted in American mountain climbing. Friedman profiles a Virginia ranger who was struck by lightning seven times—and dubbed the human lightning rod—along with scores of others who tell astonishing tales of rescue and survival. And he charts lightning’s profound, life-altering effects on the emotional and spiritual lives of its victims. Combining captivating fact with thrilling personal stories, Out of the Blue tells a remarkable true tale of fate and coincidence, discovery and divine retribution, science and superstition. As entertaining as it is informative, it is a book for outdoor adventurers, sports enthusiasts, science and weather buffs, nature lovers, and anyone who has ever been awed or frightened by the sight of lightning. From the Hardcover edition.