Sin and Syntax

How to Craft Wicked Good Prose

Author: Constance Hale

Publisher: Three Rivers Press (CA)

ISBN: 0385346891

Category: Reference

Page: 306

View: 2547

Offers advice on up-to-date writing styles, showing how to break through conventional modes to achieve a striking and hip style.

Sin and Syntax

How to Craft Wickedly Effective Prose

Author: Constance Hale

Publisher: Broadway

ISBN: N.A

Category: Reference

Page: 289

View: 6629

Offers advice on up-to-date writing styles, showing how to break through conventional modes to achieve a striking and hip style.

Vex, Hex, Smash, Smooch: Let Verbs Power Your Writing

Author: Constance Hale

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393084264

Category: Reference

Page: 224

View: 2218

A writing handbook that celebrates the infinite pizzazz of verbs. Writers know it instinctively: Verbs make a sentence zing. Grammar gurus agree: Drama in writing emerges from the interplay of a subject (noun) and a predicate (verb). Constance Hale, the best-selling author of Sin and Syntax, zooms in on the colorful world of verbs. Synthesizing the pedagogical and the popular, the scholarly and the scandalous, Hale combines the wit of Bill Bryson with the practical wisdom of William Zinsser. She marches through linguistic history to paint a layered picture of our language—from before it really existed to the quirky usages we see online today. She warns about habits to avoid and inspires with samples of brilliant writing. A veteran teacher, Hale gives writing prompts along the way, helping readers “try, do, write, play.” Vex, Hex, Smash, Smooch guides us to more powerful writing by demonstrating how to use great verbs with style.

Wired Style

Principles of English Usage in the Digital Age

Author: Constance Hale,Jessie Scanlon

Publisher: Broadway

ISBN: 9780767903721

Category: Computers

Page: 198

View: 4815

Features a comprehensive, comprehensible A to Z list covering acronyms and when to use them, computer buzzwords and when to lose them, and playful additions to your literary lexicon. Softcover.

Building Great Sentences

How to Write the Kinds of Sentences You Love to Read

Author: Brooks Landon

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101614021

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 288

View: 2267

Based on the bestselling series from The Great Courses, Building Great Sentences celebrates the sheer joy of language—and will forever change the way you read and write. Great writing begins with the sentence. Whether it’s two words (“Jesus wept.”) or William Faulkner’s 1,287-word sentence in Absalom! Absalom!, sentences have the power to captivate, entertain, motivate, educate, and, most importantly, delight. Yet, the sentence-oriented approach to writing is too often overlooked in favor of bland economy. Building Great Sentences teaches you to write better sentences by luxuriating in the pleasures of language. Award-winning Professor Brooks Landon draws on examples from masters of long, elegant sentences—including Don DeLillo, Virginia Woolf, Joan Didion, and Samuel Johnson—to reveal the mechanics of how language works on thoughts and emotions, providing the tools to write powerful, more effective sentences.

Spunk & Bite

Author: Arthur Plotnik

Publisher: Random House Reference

ISBN: 0375723358

Category: Reference

Page: 288

View: 9593

Today's writer needs more than just a solid knowledge of usage and composition to write successfully. Bestselling author Arthur Plotnik reveals the secrets to attention-grabbing, unforgettable writing, in this trade paperback edition. Updated with all-new writing exercises, Spunk & Bite will help writers take books, articles, business reports, memos, and even e-mail messages to the next level. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Junk English 2

Author: Ken Smith

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780922233274

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 136

View: 6837

The author of Mental Hygiene and Ken's Guide to the Bible traces the damage done to English by infomercials and advertising, revealing those "junk" words, phrases, and tendencies that have made the language euphemistic and vague. Original.

How Not to Write: The Essential Misrules of Grammar

Author: William Safire

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 039335136X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 160

View: 6756

These fifty humorous misrules of grammar will open the eyes of writers of all levels to fine style. How Not to Write is a wickedly witty book about grammar, usage, and style. William Safire, the author of the New York Times Magazine column "On Language," homes in on the "essential misrules of grammar," those mistakes that call attention to the major rules and regulations of writing. He tells you the correct way to write and then tells you when it is all right to break the rules. In this lighthearted guide, he chooses the most common and perplexing concerns of writers new and old. Each mini-chapter starts by stating a misrule like "Don't use Capital letters without good REASON." Safire then follows up with solid and entertaining advice on language, grammar, and life. He covers a vast territory from capitalization, split infinitives (it turns out you can split one if done meaningfully), run-on sentences, and semi-colons to contractions, the double negative, dangling participles, and even onomatopoeia. Originally published under the title Fumblerules.

Thanks, But This Isn't for Us

A (Sort of) Compassionate Guide to Why Your Writing is Being Rejected

Author: Jessica Page Morrell

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101135532

Category: Reference

Page: 368

View: 1109

A fun, practical guide that reveals the essentials of good fiction and memoir writing by exposing the most common mistakes literary writers make. All great works of fiction and memoir are unique-but most bad novels, stories, and memoirs have a lot in common. From clunky dialogue to poorly sketchedout characters, sagging pacing to exaggerated prose, these beginners' mistakes drive any agent or editor to their stock rejection letter, telling the aspiring writer "Thanks, but this isn't for us," and leaving many to wonder what exactly it is that they're doing wrong. Veteran writing coach, developmental editor, and writing instructor Jessica Page Morrell will fill in the gaps in every rejection letter you've ever received. In Thanks, But This Isn't for Us, Morrell uses her years of experience to isolate the specific errors beginners make, including the pitfalls of unrealistic dialogue, failing to "show, not tell," and over-the-top plot twists. These are just a few of the problems that keep writers from breaking through with their work. Sympathetic and humane, but pulling no punches, Thanks, But This Isn't for Us shows writers precisely where they've gone wrong and how to get on the right track. In sixteen to-the-point chapters, with checklists, exercises, takeaway tips, and a glossary, Morrell helps readers transcend these mistakes so that they don't have to learn the hard way: with another rejection letter.

Line by Line

How to Edit Your Own Writing

Author: Claire Kehrwald Cook,Modern Language Association of America,Modern Language Association

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780395393918

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 219

View: 7200

The complete guide to self-editing, illustrating the most common problems with hundreds of before-and-after examples

How to Be a Writer

Building Your Creative Skills Through Practice and Play

Author: Barbara Baig

Publisher: Writer's Digest Books

ISBN: 9781582978055

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 272

View: 8583

Athletes practice. Musicians practice. As a writer you need to do the same. Whether you have dreams of writing a novel or a memoir or a collection of poems, or you simply want to improve your everyday writing, this innovative book will show you how to build your skills by way of practice. Through playful and purposeful exercises, you'll develop your natural aptitude for communication, strengthening your ability to come up with things to say, and your ability to get those things into the minds (and the hearts) of readers. You'll learn to: Train and develop your writer's powers—creativity, memory, observation, imagination, curiosity, and the subconscious Understand the true nature of the relationship between you and your readers Find your writer's voice Get required writing projects done so you have more time for the writing you want to do And much more Empowering and down-to-earth, How to Be a Writer gives you the tools you need, and tells you what (and how) to practice so that you can become the writer you want to be.

When You Catch an Adjective, Kill It

The Parts of Speech, for Better And/Or Worse

Author: Ben Yagoda

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 9780767929318

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 272

View: 4105

What do you get when you mix nine parts of speech, one great writer, and generous dashes of insight, humor, and irreverence? One phenomenally entertaining language book. In his waggish yet authoritative book, Ben Yagoda has managed to undo the dark work of legions of English teachers and libraries of dusty grammar texts. Not since School House Rock have adjectives, adverbs, articles, conjunctions, interjections, nouns, prepositions, pronouns, and verbs been explored with such infectious exuberance. Read If You Catch an Adjective, Kill It and: Learn how to write better with classic advice from writers such as Mark Twain (“If you catch an adjective, kill it”), Stephen King (“I believe the road to hell is paved with adverbs”), and Gertrude Stein (“Nouns . . . are completely not interesting”). Marvel at how a single word can shift from adverb (“I did okay”), to adjective (“It was an okay movie”), to interjection (“Okay!”), to noun (“I gave my okay”), to verb (“Who okayed this?”), depending on its use. Avoid the pretentious preposition at, a favorite of real estate developers (e.g., “The Shoppes at White Plains”). Laugh when Yagoda says he “shall call anyone a dork to the end of his days” who insists on maintaining the distinction between shall and will. Read, and discover a book whose pop culture references, humorous asides, and bracing doses of discernment and common sense convey Yagoda’s unique sense of the “beauty, the joy, the artistry, and the fun of language.”

The Writer's Art

Author: James J. Kilpatrick

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

ISBN: 1449405614

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 262

View: 7260

"Writing comes in grades of quality in the fashion of beer and baseball games," says James J. Kilpatrick, "good, better, and best." With the experience of a lifetime of writing, he tells us, he wants to make a few judgment calls. And Jack Kilpatrick, master of the art, is as good as his word. In the tradition of Theodore Bernstein, Edwin Newman, and William Safire, James J. Kilpatrick gives us a finely crafted, witty guide to writing well. Written for laymen and professionals alike, The Writer's Art highlights techniques and examples of good writing. A section of the book called "My Crotchets and Your Crotchets" comprises more than 200 personal judgment calls, often controversial, often funny, on word usage.

It Was the Best of Sentences, It Was the Worst of Sentences

A Writer's Guide to Crafting Killer Sentences

Author: June Casagrande

Publisher: Ten Speed Press

ISBN: 9781580083782

Category: Reference

Page: 224

View: 5078

Great writing isn’t born, it’s built—sentence by sentence. But too many writers—and writing guides—overlook this most important unit. The result? Manuscripts that will never be published and writing careers that will never begin. In this wickedly humorous manual, language columnist June Casagrande uses grammar and syntax to show exactly what makes some sentences great—and other sentences suck. With chapters on “Conjunctions That Kill” and “Words Gone Wild,” this lighthearted guide is perfect for anyone who’s dead serious about writing, from aspiring novelists to nonfiction writers, conscientious students to cheeky literati. So roll up your sleeves and prepare to craft one bold, effective sentence after another. Your readers will thank you. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Arabic Rhetoric

A Pragmatic Analysis

Author: Hussein Abdul-Raof

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134170351

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 256

View: 9741

Arabic Rhetoric explores the history, disciplines, order and pragmatic functions of Arabic speech acts. It offers a new understanding of Arabic rhetoric and employs examples from modern standard Arabic as well as providing a glossary of over 448 rhetorical expressions listed in English with their translations, which make the book more accessible to the modern day reader. Hussein’s study of Arabic rhetoric bridges the gap between learning and research, whilst also meeting the academic needs of our present time. This up-to-date text provides a valuable source for undergraduate students learning Arabic as a foreign language, and is also an essential text for researchers in Arabic, Islamic studies, and students of linguistics and academics.

Narrative Design

A Writer's Guide to Structure

Author: Madison Smartt Bell

Publisher: W. W. Norton

ISBN: 9780393971231

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 377

View: 869

With clarity, verve, and the sure instincts of a good teacher, bestselling author Madison Smartt Bell illuminates the process of narrative design. In essays and analyses of twelve stories by established writers and students, Bell emphasizes the primary importance of form as the backdrop against which all other elements of a story much work. Discussions of the unconscious mind and creativity reinforce other essentials of good writing.

Have You Eaten Grandma?

Author: Gyles Brandreth

Publisher: Michael Joseph

ISBN: 9780241352649

Category:

Page: 320

View: 4343

It can be much harder than it seems; commas, colons, semi-colons and even apostrophes can drive us all mad at times, but it riles no one more than the longest-serving resident of Countdown's Dictionary Corner, grammar guru Gyles Brandreth. In this brilliantly funny tirade and guide, Gyles anatomizes the linguistic horrors of our times, tells us where we've been going wrong (and why) and shows us how, in future, we can get it right every time. Is 'alright' all right? You'll find out right here. From dangling clauses to gerunds, you'll also discover why Santa's helpers are subordinate clauses. In Have You Eaten Grandma? he waxes lyrical about the importance of language as, after all, it is what we use to define ourselves and, ultimately, is what makes us human.