Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher

The Epic Life and Immortal Photographs of Edward Curtis

Author: Timothy Egan

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0618969020

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 370

View: 3124

A narrative account of the pioneering photographer's life-risking effort to document a disappearing North American Indian nation offers insight into the danger and resolve behind his venture, his elevation to an impassioned advocate and the posthumous discovery of his considerable achievements. By the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Big Burn. 75,000 first printing.

Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher

The Epic Life and Immortal Photographs of Edward Curtis

Author: Timothy Egan

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547840608

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 1839

“A vivid exploration of one man's lifelong obsession with an idea . . . Egan’s spirited biography might just bring [Curtis] the recognition that eluded him in life.” — Washington Post Edward Curtis was charismatic, handsome, a passionate mountaineer, and a famous portrait photographer, the Annie Leibovitz of his time. He moved in rarefied circles, a friend to presidents, vaudeville stars, leading thinkers. But when he was thirty-two years old, in 1900, he gave it all up to pursue his Great Idea: to capture on film the continent’s original inhabitants before the old ways disappeared. Curtis spent the next three decades documenting the stories and rituals of more than eighty North American tribes. It took tremendous perseverance — ten years alone to persuade the Hopi to allow him to observe their Snake Dance ceremony. And the undertaking changed him profoundly, from detached observer to outraged advocate. Curtis would amass more than 40,000 photographs and 10,000 audio recordings, and he is credited with making the first narrative documentary film. In the process, the charming rogue with the grade school education created the most definitive archive of the American Indian. “A darn good yarn. Egan is a muscular storyteller and his book is a rollicking page-turner with a colorfully drawn hero.” — San Francisco Chronicle "A riveting biography of an American original." – Boston Globe

Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher

The Epic Life and Immortal Photographs of Edward Curtis

Author: Timothy Egan

Publisher: Mariner Books

ISBN: 9780544102767

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 370

View: 9999

Recounts the pioneering photographer's life-risking effort to document the disappearing North American Indian nation, offering insight into the danger and resolve behind his venture, his elevation to an impassioned advocate, and the posthumous discovery of his achievements.

The Shadow Catcher

A Novel

Author: Marianne Wiggins

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0743265211

Category: Fiction

Page: 323

View: 7762

Inspired by the life of legendary photographer Edward Curtis, a series of tales about a photographer's developing relationship with the Native Americans he astonishes by showing them pictures of themselves is interspersed with parallel tales about an unsung soldier, a husband, and a father. Reprint. 40,000 first printing.

The Image Taker

The Selected Stories and Photographs of Edward S. Curtis

Author: Edward S. Curtis,Gerald Hausman

Publisher: World Wisdom, Inc

ISBN: 1933316705

Category: History

Page: 177

View: 9908

The photographs and stories of Edward S Curtis, speak though time of a bygone age.

Shadow Catcher

The Life and Work of Edward S. Curtis

Author: Laurie Lawlor,Edward S. Curtis

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803280465

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 132

View: 3561

Sixty of Edward Curtis' photographs are included in this story of his life and the Native American cultures he studied early in the twentieth century, creating what is still the most extensive and informative collection of its kind.

Shadow Catcher

How Edward S. Curtis Documented American Indian Dignity and Beauty

Author: Michael Burgan

Publisher: Capstone

ISBN: 0756549922

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 64

View: 515

"Chronicles the life of Edward S. Curtis and his 20-volume life's work, The North American Indian"--

The Worst Hard Time

The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl

Author: Timothy Egan

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780547347776

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 9728

In a tour de force of historical reportage, Timothy Egan’s National Book Award–winning story rescues an iconic chapter of American history from the shadows. The dust storms that terrorized the High Plains in the darkest years of the Depression were like nothing ever seen before or since. Following a dozen families and their communities through the rise and fall of the region, Timothy Egan tells of their desperate attempts to carry on through blinding black dust blizzards, crop failure, and the death of loved ones. Brilliantly capturing the terrifying drama of catastrophe, he does equal justice to the human characters who become his heroes, “the stoic, long-suffering men and women whose lives he opens up with urgency and respect” (New York Times). In an era that promises ever-greater natural disasters, The Worst Hard Time is “arguably the best nonfiction book yet” (Austin Statesman Journal) on the greatest environmental disaster ever to be visited upon our land and a powerful reminder about the dangers of trifling with nature. This e-book includes a sample chapter of THE IMMORTAL IRISHMAN.

The Big Burn

Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire that Saved America

Author: Timothy Egan

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780547416861

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 1357

National Book Award–winner Timothy Egan turns his historian's eye to the largest-ever forest fire in America and offers an epic, cautionary tale for our time. On the afternoon of August 20, 1910, a battering ram of wind moved through the drought-stricken national forests of Washington, Idaho, and Montana, whipping the hundreds of small blazes burning across the forest floor into a roaring inferno that jumped from treetop to ridge as it raged, destroying towns and timber in the blink of an eye. Forest rangers had assembled nearly ten thousand men to fight the fires, but no living person had seen anything like those flames, and neither the rangers nor anyone else knew how to subdue them. Egan recreates the struggles of the overmatched rangers against the implacable fire with unstoppable dramatic force, and the larger story of outsized president Teddy Roosevelt and his chief forester, Gifford Pinchot, that follows is equally resonant. Pioneering the notion of conservation, Roosevelt and Pinchot did nothing less than create the idea of public land as our national treasure, owned by every citizen. Even as TR's national forests were smoldering they were saved: The heroism shown by his rangers turned public opinion permanently in favor of the forests, though it changed the mission of the forest service in ways we can still witness today. This e-book includes a sample chapter of SHORT NIGHTS OF THE SHADOW CATCHER.

Sacred Legacy

Edward S. Curtis and the North American Indian

Author: Edward S. Curtis,Christopher Cardozo

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780743203746

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 8447

Presents more than two hundred of the author's acclaimed images of Native American life, accompanied by commentary on his landmark work and its significance in terms of shaping the ways in which we view Native American culture.

Lasso the Wind

Away to the New West

Author: Timothy Egan

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307557308

Category: Travel

Page: 288

View: 9870

A New York Times Notable Book of the Year Winner of the Mountains and Plains Book Seller's Association Award "Sprawling in scope. . . . Mr. Egan uses the past powerfully to explain and give dimension to the present." --The New York Times "Fine reportage . . . honed and polished until it reads more like literature than journalism." --Los Angeles Times "They have tried to tame it, shave it, fence it, cut it, dam it, drain it, nuke it, poison it, pave it, and subdivide it," writes Timothy Egan of the West; still, "this region's hold on the American character has never seemed stronger." In this colorful and revealing journey through the eleven states west of the 100th meridian, Egan, a third-generation westerner, evokes a lovely and troubled country where land is religion and the holy war between preservers and possessors never ends. Egan leads us on an unconventional, freewheeling tour: from America's oldest continuously inhabited community, the Ancoma Pueblo in New Mexico, to the high kitsch of Lake Havasu City, Arizona, where London Bridge has been painstakingly rebuilt stone by stone; from the fragile beauty of Idaho's Bitterroot Range to the gross excess of Las Vegas, a city built as though in defiance of its arid environment. In a unique blend of travel writing, historical reflection, and passionate polemic, Egan has produced a moving study of the West: how it became what it is, and where it is going. "The writing is simply wonderful. From the opening paragraph, Egan seduces the reader. . . . Entertaining, thought provoking." --The Arizona Daily Star Weekly "A western breeziness and love of open spaces shines through Lasso the Wind. . . . The writing is simple and evocative." --The Economist From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Great Warriors

Author: Edward S. Curtis,Christopher Cardozo

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780821228944

Category: Photography

Page: 127

View: 2330

One hundred compelling photographs present a series of evocative portraits of Native Americans from the turn of the century, in a large-format visual study enhanced by informative essays on Edward S. Curtis and his work. 25,000 first printing.

Edward S. Curtis

Visions of the First Americans

Author: Don Gulbrandsen

Publisher: Chartwell Books

ISBN: 9780785826507

Category: Photography

Page: 256

View: 3768

Edward S. Curtis: Visions of the First Americans is a tribute to the photographer, his work, but above all to the Native Americans he photographed. Chapters on many different Native American tribes make this collection unique. Edward Curtis's recognizable style, saturated with sepia, is immediately recognizable. He captures not only the striking faces of his subjects, but also a glimpse into the lifestyle of each Native American tribe he photographed. Women grind corn, and communities gather outside their traditional living areas. Atop horses, Native Americans ride on the prarie. Papooses are bundled in woven carrying packs, and men are dressed in full feathered regalia. These images paint a picture, known to us now only as a historical memory. Many tribes are featured in this volume, from the familiar Apache and Navaho to lesser-known tribes. This book will draw in readers who are interested in world cultures, along with photography buffs and historians. This hardcover volume is a wonderful addition to any library.

The Immortal Irishman

The Irish Revolutionary Who Became an American Hero

Author: Timothy Egan

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin

ISBN: 9780544272880

Category:

Page: 448

View: 2127

The epic story of an Irish rebel turned American hero who shaped history on a global scale, including as a fighter for slaves' freedom in all the iconic battles of the American Civil War

Breaking Blue

Author: Timothy Egan

Publisher: Sasquatch Books

ISBN: 9781570614293

Category: True Crime

Page: 243

View: 6753

An investigation into the oldest open murder case in the United States follows Sheriff Tony Bamonte as he attempts to discover who shot Pend Oreille County's town marshal fifty-four years earlier.

The Winemaker's Daughter

Author: Timothy Egan

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307429636

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 3950

Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times national correspondent Timothy Egan turns to fiction with The Winemaker's Daughter, a lyrical and gripping novel about the harsh realities and ecological challenges of turning water into wine. When Brunella Cartolano visits her father on the family vineyard in the basin of the Cascade Mountains, she's shocked by the devastation caused by a four-year drought. Passionate about the Pacific Northwest ecology, Brunella, a cultural impact analyst, is embroiled in a battle to save the Seattle waterfront from redevelopment and to preserve a fisherman's livelihood. But when a tragedy among fire-jumpers results from a failure of the water supply–her brother Niccolo is among those lost--Brunella finds herself with another mission: to find out who is sabotaging the area's water supply. Joining forces with a Native American Forest Ranger, she discovers deep rifts rooted in the region's complicated history, and tries to save her father's vineyard from drying up for good . . . even as violence and corruption erupt around her. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Edward S. Curtis

One Hundred Masterworks

Author: Christopher Cardozo

Publisher: Prestel Pub

ISBN: 9783791354217

Category: Photography

Page: 184

View: 407

Showcasing Edward Curtis's most compelling and important works, this beautiful publication highlights both iconic and rarely seen images, demonstrating his artistry and mastery of photographic mediums, and his commitment to documenting and preserving for posterity the Native Americans' traditions and ways of life. Never before have Curtis's finest photographs been presented with such fidelity and power in book form. Creating a unique visual mosaic, the photographs give the viewer a deep, rich understanding of Curtis's accomplishments as an artist, while exploring the crucial role the Native American participants played in co-creating this iconic body of work.

Edward S. Curtis

Author: Barry Pritzker,Edward S. Curtis

Publisher: Gramercy

ISBN: 9780517069813

Category: Indians of North America

Page: 112

View: 6808

A collection of the author's photographs of North American Indians.

Empire of the Summer Moon

Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History

Author: S. C. Gwynne

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416597158

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 2154

Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize This stunning historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West was a major New York Times bestseller. In the tradition of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, a stunningly vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all. S. C. Gwynne’s Empire of the Summer Moon spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history. The second entails one of the most remarkable narratives ever to come out of the Old West: the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches. Although readers may be more familiar with the tribal names Apache and Sioux, it was in fact the legendary fighting ability of the Comanches that determined just how and when the American West opened up. Comanche boys became adept bareback riders by age six; full Comanche braves were considered the best horsemen who ever rode. They were so masterful at war and so skillful with their arrows and lances that they stopped the northern drive of colonial Spain from Mexico and halted the French expansion westward from Louisiana. White settlers arriving in Texas from the eastern United States were surprised to find the frontier being rolled backward by Comanches incensed by the invasion of their tribal lands. So effective were the Comanches that they forced the creation of the Texas Rangers and account for the advent of the new weapon specifically designed to fight them: the six-gun. The war with the Comanches lasted four decades, in effect holding up the development of the new American nation. Gwynne’s exhilarating account delivers a sweeping narrative that encompasses Spanish colonialism, the Civil War, the destruction of the buffalo herds, and the arrival of the railroads—a historical feast for anyone interested in how the United States came into being. Against this backdrop Gwynne presents the compelling drama of Cynthia Ann Parker, a lovely nine-year-old girl with cornflower-blue eyes who was kidnapped by Comanches from the far Texas frontier in 1836. She grew to love her captors and became infamous as the “White Squaw” who refused to return until her tragic capture by Texas Rangers in 1860. More famous still was her son Quanah, a warrior who was never defeated and whose guerrilla wars in the Texas Panhandle made him a legend. S. C. Gwynne’s account of these events is meticulously researched, intellectually provocative, and, above all, thrillingly told. Empire of the Summer Moon announces him as a major new writer of American history.