Seeking Our Past

An Introduction to North American Archaeology

Author: Sarah Ward Neusius,G. Timothy Gross

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195173857

Category: History

Page: 688

View: 4766


Fantastic archaeology

the wild side of North American prehistory

Author: Stephen Williams

Publisher: Univ of Pennsylvania Pr

ISBN: 9780812282382

Category: History

Page: 407

View: 2725


The Cambridge Companion to Historical Archaeology

Author: Dan Hicks,Mary C. Beaudry

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107495172

Category: Social Science

Page: 420

View: 3510

The Cambridge Companion to Historical Archaeology provides an overview of the international field of historical archaeology (c.AD 1500 to the present) through seventeen specially-commissioned essays from leading researchers in the field. The volume explores key themes in historical archaeology including documentary archaeology, the writing of historical archaeology, colonialism, capitalism, industrial archaeology, maritime archaeology, cultural resource management and urban archaeology. Three special sections explore the distinctive contributions of material culture studies, landscape archaeology and the archaeology of buildings and the household. Drawing on case studies from North America, Europe, Australasia, Africa and around the world, the volume captures the breadth and diversity of contemporary historical archaeology, considers archaeology's relationship with history, cultural anthropology and other periods of archaeological study, and provides clear introductions to alternative conceptions of the field. This book is essential reading for anyone studying or researching the material remains of the recent past.

North American Archaeology

Author: Timothy R. Pauketat,Diana DiPaolo Loren

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780631231844

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 6435

This volume offers a rich and informative introduction to North American archaeology for all those interested in the history and culture of North American natives. Organized around central topics and debates within the discipline. Illustrated with case studies based on the lives of real people, to emphasize human agency, cultural practice, the body, issues of inequality, and the politics of archaeological practice. Highlights current understandings of cultural and historical processes in North America and situates these understandings within a global perspective.

Digging Up the Past

An Introduction to Archaeological Excavation

Author: John Collis

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 0750954183

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 8577

This concise, readable, and well-illustrated introduction to the methods of excavation describes the basics behind a technique that is essential for every variety of archaeology. This invaluable guide presents new ideas on excavation techniques and challenges traditional approaches to site organization and recording. Practical solutions to procedural and interpretive problems are recommended and the impact of computerization and other technical innovations are addressed. The history and development of archaeological excavation as it provides a background to the methods employed today is also noted. Filled with practical common sense, this is illuminating reading for amateur and professional archaeologists alike.

The Oxford Handbook of North American Archaeology

Author: Timothy Pauketat,Timothy R. Pauketat

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190241098

Category: History

Page: 704

View: 927

This volume explores 15,000 years of indigenous human history on the North American continent, drawing on the latest archaeological theories, time-honored methodologies, and rich datasets. From the Arctic south to the Mexican border and east to the Atlantic Ocean, all of the major cultural developments are covered in 53 chapters, with certain periods, places, and historical problems receiving special focus by the volume's authors. Questions like who first peopled the continent, what did it mean to have been a hunter-gatherer in the Great Basin versus the California coast, how significant were cultural exchanges between Native North Americans and Mesoamericans, and why do major historical changes seem to correspond to shifts in religion, politics, demography, and economy are brought into focus. The practice of archaeology itself is discussed as contributors wrestle with modern-day concerns with the implications of doing archaeology and its relevance for understanding ourselves today. In the end, the chapters in this book show us that the principal questions answered about human history through the archaeology of North America are central to any larger understanding of the relationships between people, cultural identities, landscapes, and the living of everyday life.

Archaeology: Discovering Our Past

Author: Wendy Ashmore,Robert Sharer

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education

ISBN: 9780767427272

Category: Social Science

Page: 744

View: 6048

This is the only textbook which is organized to follow the steps of the actual process of archaeological research in order to present the methods and theoretical frameworks of archaeology, from the planning and actual conduct of field research, to the different ways archaeological data is interpreted to produce an understanding of the past. It is also the only such textbook to give the reader a series of firsthand accounts of what its like to do archaeology, written by a variety of practicing archaeologists.

Motel of the Mysteries

Author: David Macaulay

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780547348629

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 96

View: 5443

It is the year 4022; all of the ancient country of Usa has been buried under many feet of detritus from a catastrophe that occurred back in 1985. Imagine, then, the excitement that Howard Carson, an amateur archeologist at best, experienced when in crossing the perimeter of an abandoned excavation site he felt the ground give way beneath him and found himself at the bottom of a shaft, which, judging from the DO NOT DISTURB sign hanging from an archaic doorknob, was clearly the entrance to a still-sealed burial chamber. Carson's incredible discoveries, including the remains of two bodies, one of then on a ceremonial bed facing an altar that appeared to be a means of communicating with the Gods and the other lying in a porcelain sarcophagus in the Inner Chamber, permitted him to piece together the whole fabric of that extraordinary civilization.

Uncovering the Past

A History of Archaeology

Author: William H. Stiebing

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195089219

Category: Social Science

Page: 315

View: 1959

When one hears the words "archaeology" or "archaeologist," often what comes to mind is an image of a romantic figure: Indiana Jones exploring exotic places in search of treasure and adventure. Indeed, novels, movies, and many popular accounts of archaeological discoveries have made this concept widespread. Tales of abandoned cities, ruined temples, primeval monuments, or mysterious ancient tombs tend to kindle the urge for adventure, exploration, or treasure hunting that seems to lie beneath the surface of even the most timid and conventional individuals. Today, however, archaeologists seek knowledge rather than objects that are intrinsically valuable. Their ultimate goal is to sweep aside the mists in which time has enveloped the past, helping us to understand vanished peoples and cultures. In Uncovering the Past, William H. Stiebing, Jr. offers an absorbing nontechnical history of archaeology, tracing the study of ancient material culture from its beginnings in the Renaissance through its development into the sophisticated modern discipline we know today. The first study to focus on archaeology as a discipline, Stiebing has organized this concise history into the four stages of archaeological development. The first two stages (1450-1860 and 1860-1925), known as the "heroic age," focus on the exploits of colorful, dynamic excavators who have made their mark on history and our imaginations. We read accounts of Giovanni Belzoni and the removal of the seven-ton colossus of Ramesses II, which was dragged by wooden platform and transported by boat from Egypt to London; we witness the clergyman John Peters's skirmish with Arab tribesmen, who surrounded his excavation site and finally pillaged and burned his camp; and Heinrich Schliemann's quest to prove the authenticity of Homer's Iliad by searching for ancient Troy along the Turkish coast. And we watch as archaeology comes of age as an academic discipline, employing stratigraphical excavation techniques, typographical sequence dating, and stratigraphically based pottery chronology--laying the foundation for universal archaeological activity. The third phase (1925-1960) marked the era of "Modern Archaeology," a time when, using the now generally accepted stratigraphical method of excavation, scholars were able to synthesize data to define individual cultures and trace their development through time. This period saw a greater use of scientific instruments and procedures to locate, date, and interpret remains, such as aerial photography, metal detectors, and most importantly, carbon-14 dating and tree-ring chronology. Lastly, Stiebing discusses the fourth phase of development (1960-present) which introduced a greater desire and need for a more complete understanding of ancient cultures, including their ecology, and attempts to explain why certain cultural phenomena occurred. He goes on to examine the greater emphasis on a cultural revolutionary approach, coupled with technological advances in robotics and computers over the last decade and a half and their commonplace role in modern archaeology. With over eighty photographs, illustrations, and maps, this vivid history is an outstanding introduction to the intriguing field of archaeology, chronicling the development of this former pastime of dilettantes into a rigorous science.

Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies

Author: Jared Diamond

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393609294

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 2500

"Fascinating.... Lays a foundation for understanding human history."—Bill Gates In this "artful, informative, and delightful" (William H. McNeill, New York Review of Books) book, Jared Diamond convincingly argues that geographical and environmental factors shaped the modern world. Societies that had had a head start in food production advanced beyond the hunter-gatherer stage, and then developed religion --as well as nasty germs and potent weapons of war --and adventured on sea and land to conquer and decimate preliterate cultures. A major advance in our understanding of human societies, Guns, Germs, and Steel chronicles the way that the modern world came to be and stunningly dismantles racially based theories of human history. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the Phi Beta Kappa Award in Science, the Rhone-Poulenc Prize, and the Commonwealth club of California's Gold Medal.

The Record of the Past

An Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archaeology

Author: Christopher R. DeCorse

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780134903354

Category: Social Science

Page: 253

View: 465

This book introduces readers to anthropological enquiry, and examines the major issues and themes in physical anthropological and archaeological investigation. It strongly emphasizes WHAT physical anthropologists and archeologists do with the information they study. Chapter topics include evolution, the primates, human variation, Paleolithic cultures, and the roles of the applied anthropologist. For those individuals who understand that an enhanced global awareness is essential for people preparing to take their place in the fast-paced, increasingly interconnected world of the twenty-first century.

The First North Americans

An Archaeological Journey

Author: Brian M. Fagan

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780500021200

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 1812

Presents a history of North American settlement, from the first settlers over 15,000 years ago to the arrival of the Europeans in the fifthteenth century.

A Prehistory of South America

Author: Jerry D. Moore

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1492013323

Category: Social Science

Page: 560

View: 7649

A Prehistory of South America is an overview of the ancient and historic native cultures of the entire continent of South America based on the most recent archaeological investigations. This accessible, clearly written text is designed to engage undergraduate and begining graduate studens in anthropology. For more than 12,000 years, South American cultures ranged from mobile hunters and gatherers to rulers and residents of colossal cities. In the process, native South American societies made advancements in agriculture and economic systems and created great works of art—in pottery, textiles, precious metals, and stone—that still awe the modern eye. Organized in broad chronological periods, A Prehistory of South America explores these diverse human achievements, emphasizing the many adaptations of peoples from a continent-wide perspective. Moore examines the archaeologies of societies across South America, from the arid deserts of the Pacific coast and the frigid Andean highlands to the humid lowlands of the Amazon Basin and the fjords of Patagonia and beyond. Illustrated in full color and suitable for an educated general reader interested in the Precolumbian peoples of South America, A Prehistory of South America is a long overdue addition to the literature on South American archaeology.

Archaeology

An Introduction

Author: Kevin Greene,Tom Moore

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136860290

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 5494

Archaeology: An Introduction looks behind the popular aspects of archaeology such as the discovery and excavation of sites, the study of human remains and animal bones, radiocarbon dating, museums and 'heritage' displays, and reveals the methods used by archaeologists. It also explains how the subject emerged from an amateur pursuit in the eighteenth century into a serious discipline, and explores changing fashions in interpretation in recent decades. This fifth edition has been updated by a new co-author, Tom Moore, and continues to include key references and guidance to help new readers find their way through the ever expanding range of archaeological publications. It conveys the excitement of new archaeological discoveries that appear on television or in newspapers while helping readers to evaluate them by explaining the methods and theories that lie behind them. Above all, while serving as a lucid textbook, it remains a very accessible account that will interest a wide readership. In addition to drawing upon examples and case studies from many regions of the world and periods of the past, it incorporates the authors' own fieldwork, research and teaching and features a new four-colour text design and colour illustrations plus an additional 50 topic boxes. The comprehensive glossary and bibliography are complemented by a support website hosted by Routledge to assist further study and wider learning. It includes chapter overviews, a testbank of questions, powerpoint discussion questions, web-links to support material for every chapter plus an online glossary and image bank. New to the fifth edition: inclusion of the latest survey techniques updated material on the development in dating, DNA analysis, isotopes and population movement coverage of new themes such as identity and personhood how different societies are defined from an anthropological point of view and the implications of this for archaeological interpretation the impact of climate change and sustainability on heritage management more on the history of archaeology Visit the companion website at www.routledge.com/textbooks/greene for additional resources, including: chapter overviews a testbank of questions PowerPoint discussion questions links to support material for every chapter an online glossary and image bank

Chaco Canyon

Archaeologists Explore the Lives of an Ancient Society

Author: Brian M. Fagan

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: N.A

Category: Architecture

Page: 256

View: 8425

In this account of the people of Chaco Canyon, a leading expert on prehistoric culture weaves the latest discoveries on Chaco into a narrative of the foraging bands, humble farmers, and elaborate society that flourished between the tenth and twelfth centuries A.D.

Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods

An Investigative Approach

Author: Mark Balnaves,Peter Caputi

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1848608640

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 6311

Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods is a student-friendly introduction to quantitative research methods and basic statistics. It uses a detective theme throughout the text and in multimedia courseware to show how quantitative methods have been used to solve real-life problems. The book focuses on principles and techniques that are appropriate to introductory level courses in media, psychology and sociology. Examples and illustrations are drawn from historical and contemporary research in the social sciences. The multimedia courseware provides tutorial work on sampling, basic statistics, and techniques for seeking information from databases and other sources. The statistics modules can be used as either part of a detective games or directly in teaching and learning. Brief video lessons in SPSS, using real datasets, are also a feature of the CD-ROM. Why would you choose Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods - It is theoretical, providing a concise overview of issues of quantitative research. - It is practical, providing case studies that exemplify the different ways of research is conducted in the social sciences (ranging from psychology to sociology, politics and media). - It is educational, providing practical vignettes, and chapter highlights for revision. - It is integrative, producing a typology of different ways of conducting quantitative research methods. - It is international, providing case studies from a range of countries. - It is innovative, providing multimedia tutorials on generic research and statistical skills. - It is clear, concise and accessible.

The Archaeology of Greece

An Introduction

Author: William R. Biers

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780801482809

Category: Social Science

Page: 350

View: 1267

An introduction for students, teachers, and lay readers to the delights of exploring the world of ancient Greece.

New Media

A Critical Introduction

Author: Martin Lister

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 0415431603

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 446

View: 6708

New Media: A Critical Introduction is a comprehensive introduction to the culture, history, technologies and theories of new media. Written especially for students, the book considers the ways in which 'new media' really are new, assesses the claims that a media and technological revolution has taken place and formulates new ways for media studies to respond to new technologies. The authors introduce a wide variety of topics including: how to define the characteristics of new media; social and political uses of new media and new communications; new media technologies, politics and globalization; everyday life and new media; theories of interactivity, simulation, the new media economy; cybernetics, cyberculture, the history of automata and artificial life. Substantially updated from the first edition to cover recent theoretical developments, approaches and significant technological developments, this is the best and by far the most comprehensive textbook available on this exciting and expanding subject. At www.newmediaintro.com you will find: additional international case studies with online references specially created You Tube videos on machines and digital photography a new 'Virtual Camera' case study, with links to short film examples useful links to related websites, resources and research sites further online reading links to specific arguments or discussion topics in the book links to key scholars in the field of new media.

Little History of Archaeology

Author: Brian Fagan

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300235283

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 9948

The thrilling history of archaeological adventure, with tales of danger, debate, audacious explorers, and astonishing discoveries around the globe What is archaeology? The word may bring to mind images of golden pharaohs and lost civilizations, or Neanderthal skulls and Ice Age cave art. Archaeology is all of these, but also far more: the only science to encompass the entire span of human history—more than three million years! This Little History tells the riveting stories of some of the great archaeologists and their amazing discoveries around the globe: ancient Egyptian tombs, Mayan ruins, the first colonial settlements at Jamestown, mysterious Stonehenge, the incredibly preserved Pompeii, and many, many more. In forty brief, exciting chapters, the book recounts archaeology’s development from its eighteenth-century origins to its twenty-first-century technological advances, including remote sensing capabilities and satellite imagery techniques that have revolutionized the field. Shining light on the most intriguing events in the history of the field, this absolutely up-to-date book illuminates archaeology’s controversies, discoveries, heroes and scoundrels, global sites, and newest methods for curious readers of every age.