Rethinking the Irish Diaspora

After The Gathering

Author: Johanne Devlin Trew,Michael Pierse

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319407848

Category: Social Science

Page: 299

View: 9103

This book provides scholarly perspectives on a range of timely concerns in Irish diaspora studies. It offers a focal point for fresh interchanges and theoretical insights on questions of identity, Irishness, historiography and the academy’s role in all of these. In doing so, it chimes with the significant public debates on Irish and Irish emigrant identities that have emerged from Ireland’s The Gathering initiative (2013) and that continue to reverberate throughout the Decade of Centenaries (2012-2023) in Ireland, North and South. In ten chapters of new research on key areas of concern in this field, the book sustains a conversation centred on three core questions: what is diaspora in the Irish context and who does it include/exclude? What is the view of Ireland and Northern Ireland from the diaspora? How can new perspectives in the academy engage with a more rigorous and probing theorisation of these concerns? This thought-provoking work will appeal to students and scholars of history, geography, literature, sociology, tourism studies and Irish studies.

Rethinking the Irish in the American South

Beyond Rounders and Reelers

Author: Bryan Albin Giemza

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1617037990

Category: History

Page: 223

View: 8102

Studies of the Irish presence in America have tended to look to the main corridors of emigration, and hence outside the American South. Yet the Irish constituted a significant minority in the region. Indeed, the Irish fascination expresses itself in Southern context in powerful, but disparate, registers: music, literature, and often, a sense of shared heritage. Rethinking the Irish in the South aims to create a readable, thorough introduction to the subject, establishing new ground for areas of inquiry. These essays offer a revisionist critique of the Irish in the South, calling into question widely held understandings of how Irish culture was transmitted. The discussion ranges from Appalachian ballads, to Gone With the Wind, to the Irish rock band U2, to Atlantic-spanning literary friendships. Rather than seeing the Irish presence as "natural" or something completed in the past, these essays posit a shifting, evolving, and unstable influence. Taken collectively, they offer a new framework for interpreting the Irish in the region. The implications extend to the interpretation of migration patterns, to the understanding of Irish diaspora, and the assimilation of immigrants and their ideas

Rethinking Diasporas

Hidden Narratives and Imagined Borders

Author: Aoileann Ní Éigeartaigh,Kevin Howard,David Getty

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 1443802492

Category: Social Science

Page: 130

View: 8388

Central to the aim of both this book is to rethink the concept of diaspora as it is used both academically and popularly at the beginning of the twenty-first century. It seeks to interrogate the notion of “diaspora” in an interdisciplinary way, and to explore the contradictions inherent in contemporary notions of place and identity. It presents explorations of both “traditional” diasporas, such as the Irish community in the United States and in Great Britain, as well as recently established diasporas being formed through new patterns of migration and resettlement. Traditional conceptions of diaspora focused on forced exile from the homeland and the adoption of conscious strategies of integration upon arrival in the new land. In the past, it was assumed that migrants would rapidly assimilate into their receiving societies. Alternatively, migrant workers were regarded by themselves and their host societies as “sojourners”: they were not expected to integrate precisely because their alien presence was perceived to be temporary. Two poles then framed the traditional interpretation of migration and settlement. On the one hand, migrants assimilated rapidly; on the other, migrants were temporarily in the host-land. Yet, the realisation both that the melting pot is a myth and that migrant workers do not, in the main, go home, has forced an increasing acceptance of ethnic diversity. This, combined with ongoing improvements in travel and communications technologies, facilitates today’s migrants in maintaining links with their home countries. The increased visibility of transnational ethnic communities and a resurgence in labour migration in the twenty-first century, have stimulated academic interest in both contemporary diasporas and in recovering the hidden narratives of earlier global migrations. The renewed interest in the formation and narrative of diasporas is evident across a range of disciplines. Moreover, the meaningful exploration of any aspect of the humanities and social sciences requires an inter-disciplinary approach. Thus is the aim of this volume. Contributors approach the issue of diaspora from a variety of academic backgrounds: sociology, politics, history, literature and the visual arts. Concomitantly, data sources are diverse, with contributors drawing on official government publications, literary sources and personal memoirs, paintings and photographs, popular culture and personal interviews. This diversity of data sources indicates the multifarious approaches to the exploration diaspora. More importantly, it highlights the critical role played by unofficial, and often hidden, narratives in representing the experiences of those who find themselves, through a variety of political, social and economic factors, displaced. "This edited collection is a timely and precocious answer to a gap in the literature of identities and nationhood. It is a response to the new challenges and opportunities facing diasporic communities and, what is more, sets out key pointers for rethinking diaspora in the twenty-first century. At a time when western states are facing the need to re-evaluate traditional responses to ethnic difference arising from migration in the mid-twentieth century, this book posits an important perspective on the multiculturalism debate. Contrary to previous political and scholarly assumptions, this book shows that the children and grandchildren of immigrants can continue to have an ambiguous relationship to the state in which they were born in part because of the very nature of diaspora. The enduringly complex and sometimes volatile insider/outsider relationship is explored in these chapters through analysis of various narratives, in textual, spoken and visual forms. Analysis of such ‘hidden narratives’ reveals that the meaning and pertinence of membership of a diasporic community is defined as much by the context of the host country as by the discourses of the homeland. Across their various sources and case studies, the authors demonstrate the power of the juncture between dominant national discourses of the host state and the identity of its immigrants. Each author notes how different the diasporic community in question would be – not to mention the impact on its relationship to the host state and the homeland – if some of narratives hidden over time were to be reclaimed. As one author puts it, flux in elements of identity-formation in postmodern society represents a chance to ‘engage in dialogue with our own diversity’. In constructing a coherent volume from such a diverse range of cases and disciplines, the editors successfully demonstrate the wide validity of their case for ‘rethinking diasporas’. Nonetheless, the specific origins of this book – a conference held in a border town in Ireland – are, it may be argued, uniquely significant. For the current process of change in Irish national identity is inseparable from central features of diaspora-formation that the authors highlight, including economic pressures. Moreover, just as the town of Dundalk has historically felt the effects of its proximity to Northern Ireland, so the ‘imagined borders’ of diaspora explored in this book are shown to be all the more powerful for the fact that their delineation is contested." —Katy Hayward (Institute for British-Irish Studies, UCD

Remembering and Rethinking the GDR

Multiple Perspectives and Plural Authenticities

Author: A. Saunders,D. Pinfold

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137292091

Category: Social Science

Page: 253

View: 6086

Exploring the ways in which the GDR has been remembered since its demise in 1989/90, this volume asks how memory of the former state continues to shape contemporary Germany. Its contributors offer multiple perspectives on the GDR and offer new insights into the complex relationship between past and present.

Irish, Catholic and Scouse

The History of the Liverpool-Irish, 1800-1939

Author: John Belchem

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: 1846311071

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 6026

Liverpool in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was the mirror of Ellis Island: it acted as the great cultural melting pot and processing point of migration from Europe to the United States. Here, for the first time, acclaimed historian John Belchem offers an extensive and groundbreaking social history of the elements of the Irish diaspora that stayed in Liverpool—enriching the city’s cultural mix rather than continuing on their journey. Covering the tumultuous period from the Act of Union to the supposed “final settlement” between Britain and Ireland, this richly illustrated volume will be required reading for anyone interested in the Irish diaspora.

Ireland

A Short History

Author: Joseph Coohill

Publisher: Oneworld Publications

ISBN: 1780745362

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 8717

This fourth edition of Joseph Coohill’s best-selling book has been fully updated to include the latest political, economic, and social developments in Ireland. Starting with the first prehistoric inhabitants of the island, Ireland takes readers right up to the present day through the Great Famine, Home Rule, the Good Friday Agreement, and the economic struggles of the 21st century, covering the major events that have shaped the country. Clear and lucid, Coohill’s writing paints an engaging picture of a people for whom history is a key part of present-day reality. Highly accessible, yet demonstrating a sophisticated level of analysis, this book provides a valuable resource to students and all those wishing to acquaint themselves further with the complex identity of the Irish people.

Women and Exile in Contemporary Irish Fiction

Author: Ellen McWilliams

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137314206

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 243

View: 9382

Women and Exile in Contemporary Irish Fiction examines how contemporary Irish authors have taken up the history of the Irish woman migrant. It situates these writers' work in relation to larger discourses of exile in the Irish literary tradition and examines how they engage with the complex history of Irish emigration.

Remapping Citizenship and the Nation in African-American Literature

Author: Stephen Knadler

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135247188

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 8045

Through a reading of periodicals, memoirs, speeches, and fiction from the antebellum period to the Harlem Renaissance, this study re-examines various myths about a U.S. progressive history and about an African American counter history in terms of race, democracy, and citizenship. Reframing 19th century and early 20th-century African-American cultural history from the borderlands of the U.S. empire where many African Americans lived, worked and sought refuge, Knadler argues that these writers developed a complicated and layered transnational and creolized political consciousness that challenged dominant ideas of the nation and citizenship. Writing from multicultural contact zones, these writers forged a "new black politics"—one that anticipated the current debate about national identity and citizenship in a twenty-first century global society. As Knadler argues, they defined, created, and deployed an alternative political language to re-imagine U.S. citizenship and its related ideas of national belonging, patriotism, natural rights, and democratic agency.

Wurzeln

Roman

Author: Alex Haley

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783596224487

Category:

Page: 717

View: 9006


Rethinking mixed race

Author: David Parker,Miri Song

Publisher: Pluto Pr

ISBN: 9780745315676

Category: Social Science

Page: 201

View: 6353

Exploring the complexities of mixed race in Britain and the USA, Rethinking 'Mixed Race' offers a broader and more pluralistic approach to the discussion.

Secularism on the Edge

Rethinking Church-State Relations in the United States, France, and Israel

Author: J. Berlinerblau,S. Fainberg,A. Nou

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137380373

Category: Social Science

Page: 299

View: 8641

In this dynamic and wide-ranging collection of essays, prominent scholars examine the condition of church-state relations in the United States, France, and Israel. Their analyses are rooted in a wide variety of disciplines, ranging from ethnography and demography to political science, gender studies, theology, and the law.

Rethinking Nationalism

Author: Jocelyne Couture,Kai Nielsen,Michel Seymour

Publisher: Calgary : University of Calgary Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 703

View: 406

In the last two decades, nationalism has become a multiform and complex phenomenon which no longer seems to correspond to the accounts given previously by sociologists, political scientists and anthropologists. Students of nationalism now face the daunting task of renewing their subject matter. This formidable volume of seventeen essays and an extensive Introduction and Afterword by the very capable editors, contains some of the most innovative samples of present reflection on this contentious subject. Moreover, contributions are from a variety of disciplines, from different parts of the world, often reflecting very different ways of thinking about nationalism and sometimes reflecting very different methodologies, substantive beliefs, and underlying interests.

Resistance, Space and Political Identities

The Making of Counter-Global Networks

Author: David Featherstone

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 144439939X

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 7637

Utilizing research on networked struggles in both the 18th-century Atlantic world and our modern day, Resistance, Space and Political Identities: The Making of Counter-Global Networks challenges existing understandings of the relations between space, politics, and resistance to develop an innovative account of networked forms of resistance and political activity. Explores counter-global struggles in both the past and present—including both the 18th-century Atlantic world and contemporary forms of resistance Examines the productive geographies of contestation Foregrounds the solidarities and geographies of connection between different place-based struggles and argues that such solidarities are essential to produce more plural forms of globalization

New Jews

The End of the Jewish Diaspora

Author: Caryn S. Aviv,David Shneer

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814705146

Category: Religion

Page: 215

View: 2065

For many contemporary Jews, Israel no longer serves as the Promised Land, the center of the Jewish universe and the place of final destination. In New Jews, Caryn Aviv and David Shneer provocatively argue that there is a new generation of Jews who don't consider themselves to be eternally wandering, forever outsiders within their communities and seeking to one day find their homeland. Instead, these New Jews are at home, whether it be in Buenos Aires, San Francisco or Berlin, and are rooted within communities of their own choosing. Aviv and Shneer argue that Jews have come to the end of their diaspora; wandering no more, today's Jews are settled. In this wide-ranging book, the authors take us around the world, to Moscow, Jerusalem, New York and Los Angeles, among other places, and find vibrant, dynamic Jewish communities where Jewish identity is increasingly flexible and inclusive. New Jews offers a compelling portrait of Jewish life today.

Zoli

Roman

Author: Colum McCann

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783499239434

Category: Grandparent and child

Page: 382

View: 9656

"Zoli ist eine junge, starke und außergewöhnliche Frau vom Bolk der Roma. Sie stammt aus Bratislava und hat in den Wäldern der Umgebung den Vernichtungsfeldzug der Deutschen gegen ihre Leute überlebt. Als sie Jahre später die traditionellen Gesänge ihres Volkes veröffentlichen wiill, wird sie vom sozialistischen Regime unter Druck gesetzt. Auch die Sippe und ihr Geliebter verstoßen sie. Zoli flieht in den Westen -- allein und mittellos, aber voller Hoffnung, doch noch irgendwo ihr Glück zu finden"--Page 4. of cover.

Urban Green

Nature, Recreation, and the Working Class in Industrial Chicago

Author: Colin Fisher

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469619962

Category: Nature

Page: 248

View: 830

In early twentieth-century America, affluent city-dwellers made a habit of venturing out of doors and vacationing in resorts and national parks. Yet the rich and the privileged were not the only ones who sought respite in nature. In this pathbreaking book, historian Colin Fisher demonstrates that working-class white immigrants and African Americans in rapidly industrializing Chicago also fled the urban environment during their scarce leisure time. If they had the means, they traveled to wilderness parks just past the city limits as well as to rural resorts in Wisconsin and Michigan. But lacking time and money, they most often sought out nature within the city itself--at urban parks and commercial groves, along the Lake Michigan shore, even in vacant lots. Chicagoans enjoyed a variety of outdoor recreational activities in these green spaces, and they used them to forge ethnic and working-class community. While narrating a crucial era in the history of Chicago's urban development, Fisher makes important interventions in debates about working-class leisure, the history of urban parks, environmental justice, the African American experience, immigration history, and the cultural history of nature.

Rethinking Anti-racisms

From Theory to Practice

Author: Floya Anthias,Cathie Lloyd

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415183376

Category: Social Science

Page: 211

View: 4916

This collection seeks to rethink anti-racism both in light of social changes, and also of new theoretical debates about citizenship, multiculturalism, hybridity, diaspora and social movements. As well as chapters on theoretical interventions, Rethinking Anti-Racisms has substantive chapters covering issues such as: * anti-deportation campaigns * anti-fascism * education * the Southall Black Sisters * the contradictory use of ethnicity as a way of tackling racism.

Diaspora

A Journal of Transnational Studies

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Emigration and immigration

Page: N.A

View: 7286